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Thread: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

  1. #1
    Senior Member Nikonzen's Avatar
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    Default The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    Was wondering about something so I decided to ask you all.

    When I was a kid I was a bit of a pyromaniac with my magnifying glass. Now we all know that leaving a rangefinder camera wide open in the sun can wreak havoc in just seconds. So the million dollar question - what would happen if you left a mirrorless camera out in the sun with lens wide open?

  2. #2
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Nikonzen View Post
    So the million dollar question - what would happen if you left a mirrorless camera out in the sun with lens wide open?
    It might get stolen...
    [SCNR]
    EOS

  3. #3
    Senior Member Nikonzen's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    LOL You fast one senior!

    I've been googling topic...if you have mirrorless you better pay attention! Leave that cap on and lens not set on infinity is what I have learned so far. At very least apparently (assuming all conditions are right) one can stripe a sensor maybe burn a bayer filter thus creating a color issue. At worst you can literally cook the insides of the camera. Talk about an expensive game of playing with magnifying glasses.

    One of you ballers with an old unit to destroy oughtta try this one out and show us some pictures of what can happen...
    Last edited by Nikonzen; 10th December 2014 at 04:33 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    Interesting question.

    I suppose it really depends on the intensity of the light and the duration of the exposure? Given sufficient intensity and time, I'm sure it can happen, mirrorless or not. Another point to note: My understanding is that some (if not most) native mirrorless lenses automatically stop down when pointed at a bright source. So this scenario is perhaps more probable if one is using a fully manual lens.

    Similar advice about avoiding shooting directly at the sun exists in manuals for both mirrorless and DSLR cameras:

    Olympus E-M1 manual:
    Do not leave the camera pointed directly at the sun. This may cause lens or shutter curtain damage, color failure, ghosting on the image pickup device, or may possibly cause fires.
    Nikon D810 Manual:

    Keep the sun well out of the frame when shooting backlit subjects. Sunlight focused into the camera when the sun is within, or close to, the frame could cause a fire.

    When shooting in live view mode, avoid pointing the camera at the sun or other strong light sources. Failure to observe this precaution could result in damage to the camera's internal circuitry.
    Perhaps it's a remote possibility, given all the factors that'll need to line up in order for it to happen? In recent years, while we've seen various reports of sensor damage (to DSLRs) due to exposure to lasers (even briefly), there are almost practically none about sensor damage in mirrorless cameras left out in the sun.

    http://www.slrlounge.com/warning-las...camera-sensor/
    https://fstoppers.com/news/lasers-ta...ne-second-2700
    Last edited by kandinsky; 10th December 2014 at 04:47 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Nikonzen's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    So far all I have been able to find concerning DSLR is possible damage to plastic viewfinder screens. Learn something new everyday.

    What I gather from rangefinder users is that the good old sun and a little bit of carelessness has caught more than a few of them by surprise. Perhaps the silicone sensors are not as quick to burn as the old curtain shutters?

    Other thing I am finding - evidently a clear sky is more conducive to this than a cloudy or hazy one. Something about more stuff in the atmosphere to filter the light...makes sense hard to start a fire with a magnifying glass on a dull day.
    Last edited by Nikonzen; 10th December 2014 at 04:58 PM.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    It might get stolen... [SCNR]
    Haha. Best one I have heard today. Brushed up my day!
    Don't brag about your accomplishments; Show us your future works.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    It might get stolen...
    [SCNR]
    Lol!!!
    Didn't c that coming,
    Good 1

  8. #8
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    I read somewhere that the shutter on a Leica got burnt because it was left exposed to the sun directly with a lens for some time.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect


  10. #10
    Senior Member Nikonzen's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    Aperture stopped way down is another part of the recipe for destruction...it is definitely something you have to watch out for I have learned from reading about it after asking the question.

  11. #11
    Moderator keithwee's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Old Magnifying Glass Effect

    good to know but ya, I would be more worried of it being stolen heh. Nice one Octarine

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