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Thread: Silly Qn Cont'd - Portrait Flash Problems

  1. #1
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    Default Silly Qn Cont'd - Portrait Flash Problems

    How many of u have problems with flash illumination when u are shooting with camera in portrait position?

    I find that the flash comes from one side, usually left to right cos I hold my camera with the contorted wrist position. And that usually ends up with a rather one-sided illumination of the subject. Anyway around the problem? I know can use wireless flash but it seems weird for a simple snap and go kind of pic. Like too much trouble. What part can a flash bracket play here?

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    using an external flash?
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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    A good flash bracket will position the flash at the top of camera whether you're in vertical or horizontal position. Bouncing the flash helps too.

    Regards
    CK

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    or can use offshoe cord
    or macro flash...
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

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    Originally posted by mpenza
    using an external flash?
    Yupe program flash!

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    Originally posted by ckiang
    A good flash bracket will position the flash at the top of camera whether you're in vertical or horizontal position. Bouncing the flash helps too.

    Regards
    CK
    How does a flash bracket work? I haven't really seen one in action.

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    Originally posted by TME


    How does a flash bracket work? I haven't really seen one in action.
    It simply holds the flash above the camera, nothing fanciful. It has joints to allow it to do this. Check out the ones by Stroboframe. Not cheap though.

    Regards
    CK

  8. #8

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    I will think that the macro flash will generally not be a workable solution for human portrait shots. While I do now own one nor have I tried a macro flash, I believe that Macro flash are far too weak for a normal portrait shots. Reason is that the macro flash are built such that they are used close to the subject and it offers a relatively low GN as compared to the other conventional flashs. Just my two cents worth though..

    KS

    Originally posted by denizenx
    or can use offshoe cord
    or macro flash...

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    Originally posted by kssim
    I will think that the macro flash will generally not be a workable solution for human portrait shots. While I do now own one nor have I tried a macro flash, I believe that Macro flash are far too weak for a normal portrait shots. Reason is that the macro flash are built such that they are used close to the subject and it offers a relatively low GN as compared to the other conventional flashs. Just my two cents worth though..

    KS

    It will work, whoever said portraits must be people? You can use a macro ringlight and a macro lens to take a portrait of a bee, cockroach, lizard, whatever.

  10. #10

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    Ha! I knew it that someone will catch me on that. Yeap, there can be portraits of birds, bees, etc etc... Which is why I specifically mentioned that it *might* not work for human portraits (which are relatively large subjects).

    KS

    Originally posted by ckiang


    It will work, whoever said portraits must be people? You can use a macro ringlight and a macro lens to take a portrait of a bee, cockroach, lizard, whatever.

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    Originally posted by kssim
    Ha! I knew it that someone will catch me on that. Yeap, there can be portraits of birds, bees, etc etc... Which is why I specifically mentioned that it *might* not work for human portraits (which are relatively large subjects).

    KS

    I think what u mean is that the normal external flashes we use do not even light up a good area porperly and so are not suitable for people portrait. Well, the macro ring flash is even restricted in that it specifically lights up the circular area directly in front of the lens. I thought those were meant for close-up of faces like for fashio magazines, etc. Thought bounce flash or studio lights would be better for whole person shots rather than just the face or specific body parts (no pun intended!)

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    Originally posted by ckiang


    It simply holds the flash above the camera, nothing fanciful. It has joints to allow it to do this. Check out the ones by Stroboframe. Not cheap though.

    Regards
    CK
    Wrong link. Someone is squatting on this URL though.

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    Originally posted by TME


    Wrong link. Someone is squatting on this URL though.
    Oops! Wrong assumption!

    This is the correct one: (wah liao, how to remember?)

    http://www.saundersphoto.com/html/strobo.htm

    One of the cheaper ones looks like this:



    This is how it works:



    Notice the flash always stays on top.

    Regards
    CK

  14. #14

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    Errr... I guess you have misintepret what I'm trying to say. While the normal external flashes does have a limited power, they do light up a good area properly (unless you stalking someone with the big guns at really far distances! ) and are certainly a good light source for people portraits. As a matter of fact, in most situation, the flash is not the primary light source, but merely used to brighten up the shadow areas and to provide a catchlight in the eyes. Therefore, the flash output level is often set at a relatively lower power. In my case, I will almost always have a diffuser over the flash head to soften the lights. Some other folks will have prefer to use a bounce card (often a self-made white card attached to the flash).

    On the other hand, I thought that the macro ring flash has a significantly lower power (as it is meant to be used closed up and hence requiring lesser power) and as a result, might not work very well in people portraits. Well, unless you are interested in going in real close to capture the pimples. <G>

    Hope the above helps to clear some things up.

    KS


    Originally posted by TME


    I think what u mean is that the normal external flashes we use do not even light up a good area porperly and so are not suitable for people portrait. Well, the macro ring flash is even restricted in that it specifically lights up the circular area directly in front of the lens. I thought those were meant for close-up of faces like for fashio magazines, etc. Thought bounce flash or studio lights would be better for whole person shots rather than just the face or specific body parts (no pun intended!)

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    Originally posted by ckiang


    Oops! Wrong assumption!

    This is the correct one: (wah liao, how to remember?)

    http://www.saundersphoto.com/html/strobo.htm

    One of the cheaper ones looks like this:



    This is how it works:



    Notice the flash always stays on top.

    Regards
    CK
    Good pic but a little different from what I have seen. At the recent NUS graduation ceremony, some of the pros there had barckets that were just extensions to the left of the camera body (lens facing away from u). Their flashes had swivel heads but don't know if the extension brackets could move like the one shown. Maybe all they wanted was to move the flash away from tle lens axis so that the illumination won't be too harsh.

    Looks like I need a diffuser soon. Cos my night shots of people always has that "flash" look and looks very unnatural. Need to lower the power of the flash. Thought TTL flash will reduce the power automaticallly but I not using D lens lah!

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    you could try bouncing the flash..... but a diffuser would help a lot

    some of the pros maybe using Metz Hammer flash....
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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    Originally posted by mpenza
    you could try bouncing the flash..... but a diffuser would help a lot

    some of the pros maybe using Metz Hammer flash....
    How much would a commerically available dfifuser cost? I am not into sticking tissue paper over the flash unit like some recommend.

  18. #18

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    Ckiang,
    How much would the Stroboframe u posted above cost? Is it the cheapest flash bracket with a moveable arm?

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    Originally posted by rubric
    Ckiang,
    How much would the Stroboframe u posted above cost? Is it the cheapest flash bracket with a moveable arm?

    I want to know also!

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