View Poll Results: Is it better to overexpose or underexpose then adjust back in PS?

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  • Overexpose

    19 15.57%
  • Underexpose

    75 61.48%
  • Neither

    28 22.95%
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Thread: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

  1. #1
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    Question Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    Hmmm is it better to overexpose or underexpose your photos and then correct them in photoshop?

    Pls vote..
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    Then read this:
    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...se-right.shtml
    idea revealed by the way, Thomas Knoll is the graphics guru who wrote and created Photoshop and is still creating Photoshop in adobe.
    any comments?

  2. #2

    Default

    It depends la. I'm in favour of exposing to the max (right of histogram) but mebbe 1/3EV lower so i don't blow any highlights.

    Underexposing even further is pointless as it just decreases signal-to-noise ratio. =)

  3. #3
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    Default

    everyone I know says that nikon cameras intentionally under expose by a bit to retain detail, but... is there actual literature that says this? or proves this?

    I've read a few literature by thomas knoll, and i can really tell that he knows more about digital imaging than i ever will. Thus he says overexpose better, casting doubt on this for me..

    I really wanna clear up this doubt.
    thanks

  4. #4

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    Underexposed so that won't lose any details. A few CS guys told me that.

  5. #5
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    Default

    I believe some of the Nikon Manuals for digital did state that the pics will be slightly underexposed so as not to lose out details..

    Underexposed or over-exposed.. there's no rite or wrong.. it's more of the end results u wish to achieve... the slightly underexpose is good for retaining details, esp when u wan to print them. But I had also done some slightly over-exposed to achieve some burn-out effects and to blend some stuff in the photo...

    Example of over-expose..


  6. #6

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    If i read correctly, what the article said is true.

    Expose to the right(histogram) up to the point where highlights do not blow.

    i.e.:
    if you snap a white shirt, make sure the histogram don't/never touch the right.
    if you snap a night landscape with many small street lights, you are of course, allowed to blow the lights.

    In general, make sure the overblown area are not large enough to cause distractions.

    My preference is to underexpose than to blow highlights. As noise in the dark areas are less of a distraction than an overblown area.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Hmmm..... why no one seems to prefer to have the correct exposure?

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by idor
    Hmmm..... why no one seems to prefer to have the correct exposure?
    MEee .. that the way to go for it ...
    AMPA * WPPI * J team

  9. #9
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    Default

    If i am not wrong, nikon cameras do not underexpose the image,
    it shifts the mid range to the shadow area,
    this is so that more highlight dtetail and shadow detail is captured,
    the recording of light (digital) is different than that of film.

    This suits me as I have a preference for a darker image.
    so it depends on your own preference

  10. #10

    Default

    i prefer to under expose half stop.

    but depends on the mood or images you want, over expose can be interesting, if you control well.
    Eat breath LIVERPOOL!!!

  11. #11

    Default It is "design intend" for the immediate outcome of D_SLR "seems" under EV

    It is the design intent of DSLRs to produce pictures that look to be underexposed. Canon has given a very detailed explanation of that in its EOS white paper. Most camera manufacturers are doing so and Nikon is no exception.
    As most DSLR sensors are "color blind" (they can only see grey scale and not in color), it is important to load customised curve settings onto your DSLR to achieve better results.
    Have a read of the Canon EOS whitepaper from the link below - there is a great deal of good information. Enjoy the learning process!
    http://photoworkshop.com/canon/EOS_Digital.pdf
    Last edited by MCS; 11th August 2005 at 08:24 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member +evenstar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    As long as you get what you want to show others, you've got your image. There's no right or wrong.
    eat. drink. shoot

  13. #13

    Default Re: It is "design intend" for the immediate outcome of D_SLR "seems" under EV

    Quote Originally Posted by MCS
    It is the design intent of DSLRs to produce pictures that look to be underexposed. Canon has given a very detailed explanation of that in its EOS white paper. Most camera manufacturers are doing so and Nikon is no exception.
    As most DSLR sensors are "color blind" (they can only see grey scale and not in color), it is important to load customised curve settings onto your DSLR to achieve better results.
    Have a read of the Canon EOS whitepaper from the link below - there is a great deal of good information. Enjoy the learning process!
    http://photoworkshop.com/canon/EOS_Digital.pdf
    good link!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: It is "design intend" for the immediate outcome of D_SLR "seems" under EV

    If you ever need to make this kind of "mistake", or is unsure of exposure, the rule of thumb is :

    1. If you shoot negatives, err on the overexposure side.
    2. If you shoot slides/digital, err on the underexposed side.

    Of coz having said that there's a limit to how much you can err on exposure before you get a useless image. For digital also, like many people said, expose as much towards the right side of the histogram as possible but don't let the highlights blow.
    Regards
    CK

  15. #15

    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    keep it in the middle of the histogram?
    the photo below is shot on the "high" side of exposure
    http://gallery.clubsnap.com/showphot...0/ppuser/24209

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    Quote Originally Posted by Venom81
    Underexposed so that won't lose any details. A few CS guys told me that.
    I was told the same too..

  17. #17

    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    Quote Originally Posted by michhy
    keep it in the middle of the histogram?
    the photo below is shot on the "high" side of exposure
    http://gallery.clubsnap.com/showphot...0/ppuser/24209
    A histrogram is exactly what it is- a histrogram.

    If you reflect back to maths, a histrogram is simply a graphical representation of the frequency distribution of values. In the case of digital photography, it just shows you the distribution of tonal/luminance values in an image.

    Keeping it(the peak?) in the middle only ensures that your resultant image will end up with a majority of midtones.

    It doesn't necessarily give you an exposure that is correct or what you desire.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    A histrogram is exactly what it is- a histrogram.

    If you reflect back to maths, a histrogram is simply a graphical representation of the frequency distribution of values. In the case of digital photography, it just shows you the distribution of tonal/luminance values in an image.

    Keeping it(the peak?) in the middle only ensures that your resultant image will end up with a majority of midtones.

    It doesn't necessarily give you an exposure that is correct or what you desire.
    You are absolutely right. Its just a histogram. So the real question is, how does it help to take better photos with it turned ON in the camera?

  19. #19

    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    Quote Originally Posted by michhy
    You are absolutely right. Its just a histogram. So the real question is, how does it help to take better photos with it turned ON in the camera?
    It tells you the tonal distribution of the image. If you know how to interpret and relate it according to the scene it can help you maximize the usable dynamic range of the camera. e.g checking the right side of the histrogram for highlights clipping.

    However, its nothing really crucial, given sufficient familiarity with the camera, I can do the same or more just by looking at the LCD or the highlights function most of the time.

    Histrograms are much more useful, only if they can be displayed in all three RGB color channels. Only a few DSLRs have that capability now.
    Last edited by Zerstorer; 27th October 2005 at 07:32 PM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member jOhO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Better to overexpose or underexpose?

    histogram is useful, but couple it with ur LCD preview of the image and there u have it, a good benchmark for whether u've exposed correctly (or suited to your taste). of course, ur LCD better be accurate, and most LCDs are brighter than wat the same image would look on a properly caliberated monitor.

    another point is you might not have the chance to "chimp" all the time, so with experience, you can argar argar wat's good in wat situation according to the lens/body/flash combo u are using.

    after u've done all that, u can leave ur LCD and histogram permanently off. save battery!

    i'm still at the stage where i have to leaev my LCD on..

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