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Thread: Strengths of different films

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    Default Strengths of different films

    So far I've only been shooting with "idiotproof" consumer films ie Kodak Gold/ Max cos I'm unfamiliar with the other options out there. Can anyone list down like the different brands/makes of film and their relative strengths?

    Thanks!

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Strengths of different films

    Originally posted by rumraisin
    So far I've only been shooting with "idiotproof" consumer films ie Kodak Gold/ Max cos I'm unfamiliar with the other options out there. Can anyone list down like the different brands/makes of film and their relative strengths?

    Thanks!
    Maybe you can start by listing out what you shoot and your preferences.

  3. #3

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    Hmm. Well I dabble in everything. Mainly street and architectural photography I guess. Occasionally try shooting performances too.

    Actually I was thinking more like a list of what films are good for what purposes-- if you're shooting portraits, use XX film, because it gives good skin tones etc, that sort of thing.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Oh ok. For street and architectural photography, I would recommend Fuji Reala. Very good colour reproduction. You might need to use a tripod at times as this is a relatively slow film at ISO 100. I sometimes rate it at ISO 64 but that's personally preference. If you use slides, Fuji Velvia is my recommendation.

    For B&W, I use Illford Delta 100 for its fine grains. I also use faster films like the Delta 3200 at times. When I need the granier effect, I go for Illford HP5+. These are also my recommendations for street and architecture shots.

    I don't shoot portraits or performances so can't help you there. Maybe CK have some recommendations for you.

    P.S. Throw away whatever Kodak Max/Gold you might have this very minute.

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    Originally posted by Kit

    P.S. Throw away whatever Kodak Max/Gold you might have this very minute.
    Hmm... Is the Kodak Max/Gold really that bad? I still have one roll with me... Haven't tried Kodak films with my camera yet... But I know for my case I am the limitation and not the film, hehehe...

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Gunjack


    Hmm... Is the Kodak Max/Gold really that bad? I still have one roll with me... Haven't tried Kodak films with my camera yet... But I know for my case I am the limitation and not the film, hehehe...
    Yes, its really that bad. CK was complaining about them and I decided to try 1 roll myself. Totally waste of time, money and effort. Maybe its just me but I hate that orange cast Kodak films give. Their B&W films are good though.

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    i vowed to stay off the gold/max after i noticed the orion nebula in my photo turned out to be white. ha ha ha!
    Canon 300D, 30D, 5D. 17-40 f4 L, 24-105 f4 L, 70-200 f2.8 L IS

  8. #8

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    Hmm... then can you recommend any good 200 or 400 films Kit? 100 is kinda limiting and I'm not always using a fast lens.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Originally posted by rumraisin
    Hmm... then can you recommend any good 200 or 400 films Kit? 100 is kinda limiting and I'm not always using a fast lens.
    Sorry, I'm not really into that kind of film unless you're talking about B&W like the Illford SFX and the Delta 400. So I won't be able to recmmend any.

    Btw, if architectural photography is what you do, then not having fast lenses and fast films in not limiting at all. You need a tripod.

  10. #10

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    Okies, this part is based on hearsay:

    Fuji Superia X-tra 400 seems to be favoured by many as pretty good.

    This part is based on personal experience:

    I tend to be partial towards Fuji Press 800 (or pushed one stop to 1600) when shooting events (low light). Have given me consistently good results.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Actually I've used Fuji Press 800 briefly. Still have 3 rolls in the fridge. It might be good for performances as Richard pointed out but DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT use it for daytime architectural shots. Way too saturated colours.

  12. #12

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    Originally posted by Richard
    I tend to be partial towards Fuji Press 800 (or pushed one stop to 1600) when shooting events (low light). Have given me consistently good results.
    Also, one more thing. I've been strongly recommended to rate Press 800 at 640 as much as possible to give it more punch. However, I've been unable to verify it as most of the events I've shot require 1600... hehehe...

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    Originally posted by Kit
    Oh ok. For street and architectural photography, I would recommend Fuji Reala. Very good colour reproduction. You might need to use a tripod at times as this is a relatively slow film at ISO 100. I sometimes rate it at ISO 64 but that's personally preference. If you use slides, Fuji Velvia is my recommendation.

    For B&W, I use Illford Delta 100 for its fine grains. I also use faster films like the Delta 3200 at times. When I need the granier effect, I go for Illford HP5+. These are also my recommendations for street and architecture shots.

    I don't shoot portraits or performances so can't help you there. Maybe CK have some recommendations for you.

    P.S. Throw away whatever Kodak Max/Gold you might have this very minute.
    For Portraits/Weddings I use NPH 400. For wedding dinners, performances, I use Press 800, sometimes pushed to 1600. Press 800 is a great ISO 800 film, very fine grain and good colours.

    Regards
    CK

  14. #14

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    Thanks for the tips. Pretty useful.
    I think I'll try Fuji Superia X-tra-- the next time I shoot film that is.

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