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Thread: Question on lighting glass

  1. #1
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    Default Question on lighting glass

    I'm taking Product and Advertising class, and I want to shoot something like this:

    {image from gettyimages)

    Is the technique diffused lighting, followed by reflections of black paper at the sides?
    Or is it a silhouette shot? And then you light the front?

    Submissions are near and I'm stressed. We were shooting today and after compositing we realised there was a problem with the sync cord!

  2. #2

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    the spot of light on the cherries does give a clue. my sense is the white background is lighted evenly. frontal light is probably a light with a standard reflector off-centre. the exposure on the background is at least 1 stop overexposed.

  3. #3

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    You should furnish us with your equipment use. Like what camera and how many studio lights do u have? Or else we will be playing guessing game with you.

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    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    My guess is a diffused transmitted backlight with fill from top. I would use two white reflectors at the side to kick in more fill on the verges.

    Very nicely done. who would have thought of using drinking glasses for verges still life.

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    Thanks guys! We need to use both 4x5 and medium format cameras, but the 4x5 takes priority. And we have 3 lights, 500.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sion
    My guess is a diffused transmitted backlight with fill from top. I would use two white reflectors at the side to kick in more fill on the verges.

    Very nicely done. who would have thought of using drinking glasses for verges still life.

    Just what I thought. This should be the correct.

  7. #7
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    I think there's a big light for the background. 3 reflectors, 1 from below the glass support & 2 further from each side. A round light at an angle from a certain height. And then test & see how's the outcome. Hee...hee....
    Just my another no brainer suggestions again. Don't take that as an advise, OK? Cos I'm just writing for fun.

  8. #8

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    with 3 x 500w lights you should have more than enough fire power to do this.

    I am guessing that your lecturer would have taught you enought to do this. Reflect. One of you should have a DSlr use this light a digital poloariod.

    Hint if you have a large soft box 1x1 or larger this can work as the source of the background.

    Quote Originally Posted by christysg
    I'm taking Product and Advertising class, and I want to shoot something like this:

    {image from gettyimages)

    Is the technique diffused lighting, followed by reflections of black paper at the sides?
    Or is it a silhouette shot? And then you light the front?

    Submissions are near and I'm stressed. We were shooting today and after compositing we realised there was a problem with the sync cord!

  9. #9
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    i wonder you guys notice this... i think her most important factor is to get a piece of white plexiglas to get the reflection. the rest is more or less simple... and i wonder if she is able to get 1 piece that is bent...
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  10. #10

    Lightbulb

    the equipment you have now is sufficent for this shot. the rest, if needed, improvise. have fun. i wish i can participate. hehe!

    Quote Originally Posted by christysg
    Thanks guys! We need to use both 4x5 and medium format cameras, but the 4x5 takes priority. And we have 3 lights, 500.

  11. #11

    Lightbulb

    does it have to be bent?

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt
    i wonder you guys notice this... i think her most important factor is to get a piece of white plexiglas to get the reflection. the rest is more or less simple... and i wonder if she is able to get 1 piece that is bent...

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sion
    I would use two white reflectors at the side to kick in more fill on the verges.
    Black reflectors yeild better effect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    does it have to be bent?
    at least it have to be in 1 piece from foreground to background... ya... i suppose so...

    unless there is another way is to make a platform, and then render the background out of focus. the aperture have to be very precise, and also the platform must be very big to have alot of space behind.
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    In my setup I normally use a translucent white seamless from foreground to background so that I could transmit a diffused light from the back and lay a piece of glass at the bottom on top of background material for the reflection.

    As there is no great depth of view is needed, I would choose an aperture so that the edge of the glass would blur off as the photo indicates.

    I presume the black reflectors used on the sides as some as suggested is to introduce dark edges on the glasses to make them more 3D?

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    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    top lighting with almost to the front, products on white plexiglas table, (can DIY with 4'x6' plexiglas and some angle brackets bar for less than $100.00, to bent a plexgles is very easy), back light the vertical background, two black cards at the side and slightly backward for black edges, may need another black card for the rim of the glass, no lights or reflectors from the front.

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    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights
    top lighting with almost to the front, products on white plexiglas table, (can DIY with 4'x6' plexiglas and some angle brackets bar for less than $100.00, to bent a plexgles is very easy), back light the vertical background, two black cards at the side and slightly backward for black edges, may need another black card for the rim of the glass, no lights or reflectors from the front.
    Spot on! Just did that not too long ago and this is the set up I use but without the top black card.
    I get paid more shooting part time ...... damn, I should find more time to shoot part time

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    the equipment you have now is sufficent for this shot. the rest, if needed, improvise. have fun. i wish i can participate. hehe!
    Heh, you are more than welcomed to come, you know. Tomorrow morning, Temasek Poly

    Thanks so much guys! I'm sort of feeling my way through this class, but it's a really fun one.

  18. #18

    Lightbulb

    sorry. i cannot make it tmrw morning. anyway, thanks for the invitation. the advices given here should point you and your fellow students to the right direction. again, have fun.

    Quote Originally Posted by christysg
    Heh, you are more than welcomed to come, you know. Tomorrow morning, Temasek Poly

    Thanks so much guys! I'm sort of feeling my way through this class, but it's a really fun one.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Question on lighting glass

    HI guys, it's me again. After some shooting and reshooting, I've done all I can and have submitted my slides. Thanks for all your help! I've snapped these two with my digital cam. It looks way too dark on a monitor, however.



  20. #20

    Default Re: Question on lighting glass

    interesting. but the lemon slice looks abit too dark. wasnt it supposed to be more illuminated? looks fresher that way.

    anyway, where do they offer such courses?

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