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Thread: UV Filter?

  1. #1
    mrdogbear
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    Talking UV Filter?

    Hi all,


    I just got C4000Z and am new to photography, please tell me more abt it


    Q1
    A lot of people would like to add UV filter to the lens, why? for protection purpose?

    Q2
    how to maintain my new DC?

    thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by mrdogbear
    Hi all,
    I just got C4000Z and am new to photography, please tell me more abt it


    Q1
    A lot of people would like to add UV filter to the lens, why? for protection purpose?

    Q2
    how to maintain my new DC?

    thanks!
    i am newbie too Q1 yes, for protection, the lens inside is much more expensive than the uv filter...

    Q2, use it carefully, this is what i feel oh ya, dun leave battery inside if u got a long time not using ur camera...

  3. #3
    mrdogbear
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    Talking Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by chenwei

    i am newbie too Q1 yes, for protection, the lens inside is much more expensive than the uv filter...

    Q2, use it carefully, this is what i feel oh ya, dun leave battery inside if u got a long time not using ur camera...

    For Q1, what is the diff between high end UV filter and low end UV filter? only the ability of reducing UV makes diff?

    If I buy a low end one, will it affect photo quality or become darker?

    :-)

  4. #4

    Default Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by mrdogbear


    Q2
    how to maintain my new DC?

    thanks!
    clean it after use with a piece of soft cloth and keep it in a dry box or place

  5. #5

    Default

    Hey Cool one more C-4000z user.... you can get more specific help @ the olympus section of the forums....

  6. #6

    Default Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by mrdogbear



    For Q1, what is the diff between high end UV filter and low end UV filter? only the ability of reducing UV makes diff?

    If I buy a low end one, will it affect photo quality or become darker?

    :-)
    high end filters (generally) are multicoated to improve light transmition through the filter to the lens. if u get to compare physically a high end and low end filter, u will notice that there is less reflection of light from the surface of a high end filter.

    Losses are generally around 3 to 5% in the worse case (IMO, correct me if i'm wrong, ok?). not very significant in my view.

  7. #7
    Midnight
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    Default Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by mrdogbear
    For Q1, what is the diff between high end UV filter and low end UV filter? only the ability of reducing UV makes diff? If I buy a low end one, will it affect photo quality or become darker?:-)
    Since you're using a digicam, the actual UV absorption function of the filter doesn't really matter all that much, because digicam sensors are basically insensitive to UV radiation (or at least certainly much more so than film).

    As such, the only real reason one might want to get a UV filter is for protective purposes, because if anything happens to scratch or otherwise damage the front element of your lens+filter tube, it's much cheaper and easier to replace a $10 filter than to repair a lens that costs hundreds or thousands of dollars.

    That being the case, you will want a filter that basically leaves the incoming visible light radiation completely unchanged, so that you don't end up sacrificing image quality just for protection (what's the point of getting an expensive super-sharp lens if the filter you stick on top of it ruins the image?). This is where filter coating quality comes into the equation. Basically, the idea is that every additional glass-air interface you add will result in some light being reflected, and you may end up with unwanted internal reflections within the lens tube--and these will show up as rather distracting out-of-focus spots on your image. This is typically called "lens flare".

    While reflections are inevitable, filter coatings reduce the amount of reflections tremendously; as mervlam posted, an uncoated UV filter typically reflects about 4% of incident light (note that this occurs on both surfaces of the filter), whereas a good multi-coated filter will reflect only about a small fraction of a percent (i.e. much less than 1%) of incident light. This difference may not be obvious when you observe each filter on its own, but put two such filters side by side and the distinction should be (literally) very clear. For instance, I sometimes mistake my Hoya SMC UV filter for a step-up ring, because I don't notice that there is glass inside it.... (ok, this is really embarrassing... )

    The downside of multi-coated filters is that they are (a) more expensive; and (b) more difficult to clean. Let me also qualify what I wrote above by saying that multi-coated filters are not absolutely essential--no one piece of equipment in photography ever is--but they are certainly good to have. I would at least seriously consider investing in one if I were intending to leave the filter on my lens all the time.
    Last edited by Midnight; 6th October 2002 at 01:38 PM.

  8. #8
    mrdogbear
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    Talking

    any model suggestions for high end UV filters and low end filters?

  9. #9
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    Get a Hoya HMC UV filter that costs around $15-17 (for the 52mm one).
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by Midnight
    not absolutely essential--no one piece of equipment in photography ever is--but they are certainly good to have. I would at least seriously consider investing in one if I were intending to leave the filter on my lens all the time.
    haha i know that the camera and the lens is a equipment that is absolutely essential

    btw is there a great difference if i use b+w filters or hoya HMC??
    me thinking of getting a new one. whats the price for a b+w filter (UV). 58mm?

  11. #11

    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by nicholas1986


    haha i know that the camera and the lens is a equipment that is absolutely essential

    btw is there a great difference if i use b+w filters or hoya HMC??
    me thinking of getting a new one. whats the price for a b+w filter (UV). 58mm?
    u mean black and white filters?

  12. #12
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by MaGixShOe
    u mean black and white filters?
    B+W is a brand of filters.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Hi,

    Originally posted by nicholas1986


    haha i know that the camera and the lens is a equipment that is absolutely essential

    btw is there a great difference if i use b+w filters or hoya HMC??
    me thinking of getting a new one. whats the price for a b+w filter (UV). 58mm?
    Don't think anyone can tell the difference between shots taken with a Hoya HMC or HMC Super and a B+W MRC UV filter. Of coz, if you compare either of the 2 with some super cheapo UV filter, then you might get some distortion or loss of light, etc.

    Regards
    CK

  14. #14

    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Originally posted by ckiang
    Hi,



    Don't think anyone can tell the difference between shots taken with a Hoya HMC or HMC Super and a B+W MRC UV filter. Of coz, if you compare either of the 2 with some super cheapo UV filter, then you might get some distortion or loss of light, etc.

    Regards
    CK

    i agree.

  15. #15
    Midnight
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    Default Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: UV Filter?

    Yup, I fully agree with CK's statement... I have both B+W and Hoya filters, and frankly I can't see any real difference in terms of the final image quality. Basically, everything's equal among the top offerings (they may differ in theory, but in practice one will be hard-pressed to distinguish between them), so don't worry too much about this. Besides, it's only a UV filter!

  16. #16
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    I am thinking, maybe, just maybe you might be able to see the difference if your lens is made from German glass, since B+W is German too.

    Regards
    CK

  17. #17

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    If you do mostly outdoor shoot/ potrait shoot, may I suggest you try a skylight filter?
    It helps to reduce the bluishness that frequently occurs in outdoor shoot especially in open shade under a clear, blue sky. at the same time it also serve as a protective layer for the expensive lens.

  18. #18
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    Originally posted by jimtong
    If you do mostly outdoor shoot/ potrait shoot, may I suggest you try a skylight filter?
    It helps to reduce the bluishness that frequently occurs in outdoor shoot especially in open shade under a clear, blue sky. at the same time it also serve as a protective layer for the expensive lens.
    For a DC camera? Probably doesn't make much difference because the CCD is not that sensitive to UV.

  19. #19
    Midnight
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    Originally posted by beluga
    For a DC camera? Probably doesn't make much difference because the CCD is not that sensitive to UV.
    Skylight filters do work with digital cameras, because what they counter is the excessive bluishness of sunlight around midday, which is a visible-light phenomenon, not UV. Having said that, though, if you ask me, the auto colour balancing function of digital cameras all but eliminate the need for skylight filters, so a plain UV filter should be sufficient for physical protective. Besides, if you intend to leave a skylight filter on your lens all the time, there will be occasions when its warming effect will run counter to what you intend to do with the scene.

  20. #20

    Default

    Originally posted by ckiang
    I am thinking, maybe, just maybe you might be able to see the difference if your lens is made from German glass, since B+W is German too.

    Regards
    CK
    You got a 58mm hoya UV filter? Thinking of trying it out to see if theres any difference.

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