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Thread: How to take photos for product review?

  1. #1
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    Default How to take photos for product review?

    I just bought a new vacuum cleaner. Thinking of learning to write a product review. But those photos I took, like not very nice.

    any expert in product photography can point out the mistakes?

    http://www.paulandcindy.per.sg/tmp/vacuum/

    I also dunno what is wrong, the photos are just not nice.






    .

  2. #2
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    my 2c worth...

    It's your lighting and bad choice of bg...
    I lup SG, but SG don't love me...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sjourn
    my 2c worth...

    It's your lighting and bad choice of bg...
    In addition, it might also help if the product was clean (no hairs and dirt particles sticking to it) and in focus.

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    for viewing sake, could you reduce the pic sizes to a more acceptable ones?

    i reckon ur using a normal or perhaps a prosumer digicam? i agree that the choice of bg n lighting isnt that good.

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    please go get a backdrop.... and also, do not use direct flash... i seen only 2 pics & i think i seen them all...
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    In addition, it might also help if the product was clean (no hairs and dirt particles sticking to it) and in focus.
    u can see the dirt?

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    Hire a professional?

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    Noted: clean background and no direct flash

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    Noted: clean background and no direct flash
    actually i think i can write an essay on it...

    i think i saw the topview jpeg file... that shot alone, you use a direct flash from your camera... see a hot spot? ok, den u see your composition... notice that you have something missing & something suddenly pop out of nowhere? namely the hose and the 3 pin plug, you should have removed the hose if you do not want to have it in the pic... the 3 pin plug is rather unsightly here... den notice the top panel is full of dust? need more?

    think its enough for you to digest... btw if you need some 'help' can pm me... my rates are rather low...
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  10. #10

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    The cheapest way is to take your product shots in plain white background and then use photoshop to remove the background and touch up your product shots.

    Click here to see 1 of your shots edited by me
    Last edited by megaweb; 20th July 2005 at 02:47 PM.
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

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    Quote Originally Posted by megaweb
    The cheapest way is to take your product shots in plain white background and then use photoshop to remove the background and touch up your product shots.

    Click here to see 1 of your shots edited by me
    wah... teach me how to use photoshop leh... maybe i should post 1 of my pics as sample to using the conventional method... btw, photoshop ain't cheap...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    u can see the dirt?
    Look at the little wheel in the bottom view and the hairs caught in the brushes of the accessories.

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    taken out of pic jpeg, nothing done... just added the words only.

    this is done when i bought my macro lens. notice there is a shadow at the bottom? anyway simple to eliminate on the photoshop... but den i am those ppl who can't stand little technical fault guy... so i keep trying to improve on using skills to overcome the difficulty.. (my improved shot is in my CF card at home... will post when i am free) anyway this isn't a good shot either...

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    for shiny surfaces especially SILVER round surfaces you wun want yourself to be IN the picture as well.. 2 ways to go about it. 1.) get a tent 2.)walk darn far away and zoom in.

    My worst product shot was of the Hugo Boss perfume ball.. 1 ball, polished metal surface and I din't have a tent with me.





    oh yah... that pic is owned by my client already.. so dun try to be funny with it..
    “How fortunate for leaders that men do not think.” - Adolf Hitler

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    YYK...

    the most difficult one 1 i ever did was the polarised sunglass... even tent also cannot help... anyway i still a beginner then... now still am...
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    1) Get a backdrop, start by learning how to use white. Even mahjong paper will do.
    2) Look at the object and ask yourself what makes it interesting. Compose around that.
    3) Find a big window and start by learning how to shoot with window light, since this is relatively cheap and you can see what you get.
    4) USE A TRIPOD and small apertures.
    5) Learn to use reflectors to fill-in shadows. Even white-ish newspapers will do. I use white styrofoam boards I collect from packaging for my shots.

    6) Understand shadows - a shadow appears behind an object. How obvious it is is therefore relative to the positioning of your light, background and object. Think about it and you'll understand how to reduce shadows better. The Sun is our best light source... and an overcast day casts the softest shadows... why?

    7) Ask yourself what makes this product unique / interesting and hone in on it. A macro or close-focus lens is therefore useful. I have several macro lenses, but sometimes I find that my sigma 18-50 which focuses quite close is adequate.

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