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Thread: Old Fox MiG 31

  1. #21
    Member Foxshade's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by diver-hloc View Post
    Never known there is so many Keyboard/Paper General/Warrior here in Kopitiam... LOL
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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxshade View Post

    It's on paper talk. The fact can only be established in real combat, unfortunately. Just like UK's Sea Harrier. No one took it seriously until Falkland war.
    Eh. No one is still taking it seriously either till this day...

    In fact, the English once again drove themselves into a corner by not installing a catapult on the QE carrier because of costs...
    Last edited by NazgulKing; 30th June 2014 at 10:46 PM.

  3. #23
    Member 9V-Orion Images's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by NazgulKing View Post
    Eh. No one is still taking it seriously either till this day...

    In fact, the English once again drove themselves into a corner by not installing a catapult on the QE carrier because of costs...
    The wallet is extremely tight for the United Kingdom (UK) Ministry of Defence (MoD) right now. Really not much of a choice given with cost cutting measures being implemented that will reduce their annual military budget by upwards of 10% to 20%.

    Anyway the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) is more or less modular in design so it could even be retrofitted on aircraft carriers equipped with a ski-jump ramp thus permitting Conventional Take-Off and Landing (CTOL) carrier-based aircraft such as the F-35C Lightning II or the proposed navalised Eurofighter Typhoon that requires a Catapult Assisted Take-Off But Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) system to operate.



    For a more authoritative perspective with regards to the discussion on the subject of the SR-71 Blackbird, one can always pick up any of the books authored by Colonel (Retired) Richard H. Graham or Major (Retired) Brian Shul which they had provided for in extremely detailed aspect touching on topics ranging from the aircraft engineering systems and technical sub-systems to pre-flight, in-flight, post-flight combat operations.

    Also quite a fair bit of interesting experiences albeit a little exaggerated at times which makes for an engaging interesting read none the less. Just some of the more popular excerpt from one of their many stories...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sled Driver : Flying the World's Fastest Jet

    ...

    The predominant radio chatter was from Los Angeles Center, far below us, controlling daily traffic in their sector. While they had us on their scope (albeit briefly), we were in uncontrolled airspace and normally would not talk to them unless we needed to descend into their airspace.

    We listened as the shaky voice of a lone Cessna pilot asked Center for a readout of his ground speed. Center replied: "November Charlie 175, I'm showing you at ninety knots on the ground."

    Now the thing to understand about Center controllers, was that whether they were talking to a rookie pilot in a Cessna, or to Air Force One, they always spoke in the exact same, calm, deep, professional, tone that made one feel important. I referred to it as the " Houston Center voice." I have always felt that after years of seeing documentaries on this country's space program and listening to the calm and distinct voice of the Houston controllers, that all other controllers since then wanted to sound like that, and that they basically did. And it didn't matter what sector of the country we would be flying in, it always seemed like the same guy was talking. Over the years that tone of voice had become somewhat of a comforting sound to pilots everywhere. Conversely, over the years, pilots always wanted to ensure that, when transmitting, they sounded like Chuck Yeager, or at least like John Wayne. Better to die than sound bad on the radios.

    Just moments after the Cessna's inquiry, a Twin Beech piped up on frequency, in a rather superior tone, asking for his ground speed. "I have you at one hundred and twenty-five knots of ground speed." Boy, I thought, the Beechcraft really must think he is dazzling his Cessna brethren. Then out of the blue, a navy F-18 pilot out of NAS Lemoore came up on frequency. You knew right away it was a Navy jock because he sounded very cool on the radios. "Center, Dusty 52 ground speed check". Before Center could reply, I'm thinking to myself, hey, Dusty 52 has a ground speed indicator in that million-dollar cockpit, so why is he asking Center for a readout? Then I got it, ol' Dusty here is making sure that every bug smasher from Mount Whitney to the Mojave knows what true speed is. He's the fastest dude in the valley today, and he just wants everyone to know how much fun he is having in his new Hornet. And the reply, always with that same, calm, voice, with more distinct alliteration than emotion: "Dusty 52, Center, we have you at 620 on the ground."

    And I thought to myself, is this a ripe situation, or what? As my hand instinctively reached for the mic button, I had to remind myself that Walt was in control of the radios. Still, I thought, it must be done - in mere seconds we'll be out of the sector and the opportunity will be lost. That Hornet must die, and die now. I thought about all of our Sim training and how important it was that we developed well as a crew and knew that to jump in on the radios now would destroy the integrity of all that we had worked toward becoming. I was torn.

    Somewhere, 13 miles above Arizona, there was a pilot screaming inside his space helmet. Then, I heard it. The click of the mic button from the back seat. That was the very moment that I knew Walter and I had become a crew. Very professionally, and with no emotion, Walter spoke: "Los Angeles Center, Aspen 20, can you give us a ground speed check?" There was no hesitation, and the replay came as if was an everyday request. "Aspen 20, I show you at one thousand eight hundred and forty-two knots, across the ground."

    I think it was the forty-two knots that I liked the best, so accurate and proud was Center to deliver that information without hesitation, and you just knew he was smiling. But the precise point at which I knew that Walt and I were going to be really good friends for a long time was when he keyed the mic once again to say, in his most fighter-pilot-like voice: "Ah, Center, much thanks, we're showing closer to nineteen hundred on the money."

    For a moment Walter was a god. And we finally heard a little crack in the armor of the Houston Center voice, when L.A.came back with, "Roger that Aspen, Your equipment is probably more accurate than ours. You boys have a good one."

    It all had lasted for just moments, but in that short, memorable sprint across the southwest, the Navy had been flamed, all mortal airplanes on freq were forced to bow before the King of Speed, and more importantly, Walter and I had crossed the threshold of being a crew. A fine day's work. We never heard another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

    ...

    In April 1986, following an attack on American soldiers in a Berlin disco, President Reagan ordered the bombing of Muammar Qaddafi's terrorist camps in Libya. My duty was to fly over Libya and take photos recording the damage our F-111's had inflicted. Qaddafi had established a 'line of death,' a territorial marking across the Gulf of Sidra , swearing to shoot down any intruder that crossed the boundary. On the morning of April 15, I rocketed past the line at 2,125 mph.

    I was piloting the SR-71 spy plane, the world's fastest jet, accompanied by Maj Walter Watson, the aircraft's reconnaissance systems officer (RSO). We had crossed into Libya and were approaching our final turn over the bleak desert landscape when Walter informed me that he was receiving missile launch signals. I quickly increased our speed, calculating the time it would take for the weapons-most likely SA-2 and SA-4 surface-to-air missiles capable of Mach 5 - to reach our altitude. I estimated that we could beat the rocket-powered missiles to the turn and stayed our course, betting our lives on the plane's performance.

    After several agonizingly long seconds, we made the turn and blasted toward the Mediterranean 'You might want to pull it back,' Walter suggested. It was then that I noticed I still had the throttles full forward. The plane was flying a mile every 1.6 seconds, well above our Mach 3.2 limit. It was the fastest we would ever fly. I pulled the throttles to idle just south of Sicily , but we still overran the refueling tanker awaiting us over Gibraltar.

    ...
    CS Aviation / Flickr
    Per aspera ad astra

  4. #24

    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by 9V-Orion Images View Post
    The wallet is extremely tight for the United Kingdom (UK) Ministry of Defence (MoD) right now. Really not much of a choice given with cost cutting measures being implemented that will reduce their annual military budget by upwards of 10% to 20%.

    Anyway the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) is more or less modular in design so it could even be retrofitted on aircraft carriers equipped with a ski-jump ramp thus permitting Conventional Take-Off and Landing (CTOL) carrier-based aircraft such as the F-35C Lightning II or the proposed navalised Eurofighter Typhoon that requires a Catapult Assisted Take-Off But Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) system to operate.
    The EMALS has a fair bit of power requirements and will take a bit of doing to add on even in the future. And given how the UK operates and that spending has been on a long downward slope we can be sure barring some courageous policy making, the EMALS will never happen.

    So the UK decided to spend tonnes of cash on a heavily compromised aircraft when that same money could have been spent on cheaper F/A-18E/F aircraft which would have given them more bang for buck. And as it is, the costs for F-35 aircraft can only go higher with longer delays (the aircraft is not even remotely combat capable now!)

    Heck, even the USN is still relying on the F-18E/F for its needs in the immediate future and ordered more.
    Last edited by NazgulKing; 2nd July 2014 at 03:42 PM.

  5. #25
    Member 9V-Orion Images's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31



    New infographic released by the Daily Mail (Online), HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) to be christened and launch by Queen Elizabeth II today.

    BBC (News), The True Cost Of Aircraft Carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth
    By Caroline Wyatt @ 2014-07-04 T 00:35 +1

    BBC (News), The Aircraft Carrier That Never Was
    By Nick Childs @ 2014-07-02 T 23:52 +1
    Last edited by 9V-Orion Images; 4th July 2014 at 09:12 AM.
    CS Aviation / Flickr
    Per aspera ad astra

  6. #26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 9V-Orion Images View Post

    New infographic released by the Daily Mail (Online), HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) to be christened and launch by Queen Elizabeth II today.

    BBC (News), The True Cost Of Aircraft Carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth
    By Caroline Wyatt @ 2014-07-04 T 00:35 +1

    BBC (News), The Aircraft Carrier That Never Was
    By Nick Childs @ 2014-07-02 T 23:52 +1
    Funniest part is the recent fire involving the F-35 meant they couldn't show case the aircraft.

    Also, it seems the UK has 24 F-35 on contract plus 5 on option ot something. The Prince of Wales goes straight to mothballs upon launching.

    They seriously are dead broke...

  7. #27
    Member Foxshade's Avatar
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    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by NazgulKing View Post
    Funniest part is the recent fire involving the F-35 meant they couldn't show case the aircraft.
    They can always show case the reverse immelman loop...
    Last edited by Foxshade; 4th July 2014 at 10:57 AM.
    A true photograph need not be explained, nor can it be contained in words.
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  8. #28
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    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by NazgulKing View Post
    Funniest part is the recent fire involving the F-35 meant they couldn't show case the aircraft.

    Also, it seems the UK has 24 F-35 on contract plus 5 on option ot something. The Prince of Wales goes straight to mothballs upon launching.

    They seriously are dead broke...
    Her Royal Majesty (HRM), the queen didn't even personally smash the bottle of Islay Scotch whisky against the hull herself.

    Some lame mechanical contraption did it for her, so much for naval traditions.
    Last edited by 9V-Orion Images; 4th July 2014 at 09:03 PM.
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  9. #29

    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxshade View Post
    They can always show case the reverse immelman loop...
    What loop? The entire fleet's been grounded.

  10. #30

    Default Re: Old Fox MiG 31

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxshade View Post
    They can always show case the reverse immelman loop...
    Flt Sim showcase ?
    宁愿遇见丢失幼崽的母熊,也不愿碰上做蠢事的愚人

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