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Thread: Neighbourhood

  1. #1

    Default Neighbourhood

    Good day. This is my second time seeking guidance on my photos. In the previous attempt, my takeaway were (1) as far as possible level the picture, (2)watch out for blown out areas and (3) for landscape photography timing of shoot is crucial.

    This time i am attempting on a pano on my neighbourhood, inspired by the beautiful pictures within clubsnap. The composition is not the most interesting as i yet to find the ideal spot to capture neat rows of housing. Please pardon me on composition.

    1. in what area is critique to be sought?
    Managing Exposure.

    2. what one hopes to achieve with the piece of work?
    I would like to capture the sky and present it 'naturally'.

    3. under what circumstance is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
    4 images pano, single exposure at 1/125, ISO200 with GND1.8. Was on the way to pick up kiddos and did the shoot without tripod. Took 30min before sunset.

    4. what the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture
    I found difficulty in bringing out the colour of the building. They looks 'flat' to me. I have try to do something in PS but just couldn't get it right. The far white building on the right looks very soft. I seek guidance on how i can make the building more "lively".

    Thank you.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Neighbourhood

    basically when you shoot from this angle at this timing, the subject is in back lighting, you won't get brilliant colors of your subject. the lighting on subjects simply look flats.

    you want subject to be in more vivid colors, without photoshop, it has to be lit by direct sun light.

    30 mins before sun set is too early, usually the sky is not interesting and the contrast of the lighting between sky and subjects is too high.

    I would suggest you observe and study the timing, the lighting, and how to get the balance of lighting and the exposure right first.
    follow by working on your framing, composition of ONE frame only.

    panoramic, multiple exposures, advance photoshop thingy can come later.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  3. #3

    Default Re: Neighbourhood

    Hi , you can try backlight correction in post-processing.
    e.g.
    Last edited by zaren; 12th June 2014 at 01:17 PM.
    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    basically when you shoot from this angle at this timing, the subject is in back lighting, you won't get brilliant colors of your subject. the lighting on subjects simply look flats. you want subject to be in more vivid colors, without photoshop, it has to be lit by direct sun light. 30 mins before sun set is too early, usually the sky is not interesting and the contrast of the lighting between sky and subjects is too high. I would suggest you observe and study the timing, the lighting, and how to get the balance of lighting and the exposure right first. follow by working on your framing, composition of ONE frame only. panoramic, multiple exposures, advance photoshop thingy can come later.
    Thank you for sharing. I shall focus on understanding the exposure first. I found myself starting to depend on PS to bring up the colours in the picture. This is not wrong, but mastering the exposure within the shoot itself first should be the top priority.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    Hi , you can try backlight correction in post-processing. e.g.
    Thanks Zaren for dropping by and kind enough to share with examples. Will explore and try backlight processing. Many thanks!

    One question. In your demo, did you simply adjust the photo as a whole or you selected the buildings to effect the exposure?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Neighbourhood

    Quote Originally Posted by GoLucky View Post
    Thanks Zaren for dropping by and kind enough to share with examples. Will explore and try backlight processing. Many thanks!

    One question. In your demo, did you simply adjust the photo as a whole or you selected the buildings to effect the exposure?
    You're welcome, GoLucky.

    I adjusted the photo as a whole using PhotoScape. Tools used include backlight correction, graduated tint and adjustments for levels and contrast. You should be able to get the same or better results using PS.
    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  7. #7
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Neighbourhood

    Quote Originally Posted by GoLucky View Post
    Thank you for sharing. I shall focus on understanding the exposure first. I found myself starting to depend on PS to bring up the colours in the picture. This is not wrong, but mastering the exposure within the shoot itself first should be the top priority.

    http://petapixel.com/2014/06/11/unde...our-twilights/
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    You're welcome, GoLucky. I adjusted the photo as a whole using PhotoScape. Tools used include backlight correction, graduated tint and adjustments for levels and contrast. You should be able to get the same or better results using PS.
    Thanks!

  9. #9

    Default Re: Neighbourhood

    were the images shot in raw format?

    did you process the individual frames first, before you merge them into a panorama?

  10. #10

    Default

    Thanks for the links. In my previous post you mentioned golden hours. I thought I know what is golden hour. Now then I know what is golden and blue hours.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tecnica View Post
    were the images shot in raw format? did you process the individual frames first, before you merge them into a panorama?
    I did the photo merge, compress into smart object then apply the lens correction. Shot in raw.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoLucky View Post
    I did the photo merge, compress into smart object then apply the lens correction. Shot in raw.
    I was thinking if I edit the individual photo before I merge them, the exposure and colours will be different and merging might encounter problems. Hence I merged them before I process the picture. Is my consideration valid?

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GoLucky View Post

    I was thinking if I edit the individual photo before I merge them, the exposure and colours will be different and merging might encounter problems. Hence I merged them before I process the picture. Is my consideration valid?
    The way I do it, is to apply lens correction to the raw files first, recovering whatever details(highlights, shadows) I need, before I export the files to lossless(tiff) format. Then I will merge the tiffs into panorama and then fine tuning it. Till date, I have no issue with this workflow.

    Your highlights are blown and it looked kinda distracting. Perhaps you can maximise the potential of the raw files by doing the basic detail recovery first, if they are still within dynamic range that is, then go about the merging later.

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