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Thread: Amazing video

  1. #1
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    Default Amazing video

    See how 30 hornets completely wipe out a colony of 30,000 honey bees in about 3 hours. After the masacre the hornets feast on the honey and the larvae.

    http://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=11516
    As complexity rises, precise statements lose meaning and meaningful statements lose precision.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roygoh
    See how 30 hornets completely wipe out a colony of 30,000 honey bees in about 3 hours. After the masacre the hornets feast on the honey and the larvae.

    http://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=11516
    brilliant! very violent as well ... the only part missing is the queen bee ...

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    wha.... very like the nature version of the AVP. omg.. its so nice! thanks for sharing man !!

    wha!!! amazing.. i watched it like 2 times and still finds it amazing..

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    how did they shoot this? i reckon at least 5 videographer, then at least about 10 high quality spycams... superb...

    esp like those slowmo shots of the hornets hovering in midair...
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    Very sad and cruel but that's nature at work. Honey bees produce honey, and hornets have medical benefits in TCM practices too. So we can't destory either one. Guess that's nature's way to ensure the strongest will survive.

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    amazing, thanks for sharing the clip link.

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    amazing... such close ups...

    anyway, nature trivia here.. once saw in a documentary..

    for the honey bees to prevent the onslaught of their colony.. the have to kill the 1st hornet scout before it goes back and bring their army over...

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    ha~ nature ver of Star Wars... Hopefully got episode 2: The Revenge of the Honey Bees

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    haha i'll wait till next week when im back in sg to view it!!!
    Budget wedding photographer :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Arcanic~
    amazing... such close ups...

    anyway, nature trivia here.. once saw in a documentary..

    for the honey bees to prevent the onslaught of their colony.. the have to kill the 1st hornet scout before it goes back and bring their army over...
    By the time the 1st hornet scout arrives, it's too late... It marks the hive with some kinda pheromones I think...

  11. #11
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    video!
    eat. drink. shoot

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    Why didn't the bees sting? Hornets are immune? Bees seemed not organized

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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefox
    By the time the 1st hornet scout arrives, it's too late... It marks the hive with some kinda pheromones I think...
    yeah, it does mark it with e scent, but usually the hornet scout comes alone 1st... so if the bees can kill it before it returns back and lead the soldiers to the scent, then everything is still safe~

  14. #14

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    Saw this on National Geographic or Discovery Channel before. The hornets raid the bees nest for their pupae which will be used as food for their own larvae. The hornets have biting jaws that can tear a bee apart as well as a stinger. They are also partially immune to the bee's sting. The bee's don't stand a chance.

  15. #15

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    those were european honeybees....they don't have any natural defence against the japanese giant hornets.

    the japanese honeybees, OTOH, have developed an ingenious defence against their perennial foe:

    The Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) has a unique way of defeating its sympatric predator, the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). The Japanese honeybee is a small creature with a correspondingly small sting; as its primary means of defense cannot inflict much damage against such a large predator as the giant hornet, it requires another method of defense (Ono et al 1995). Instead of utilizing its stinger against the pack-hunting hornet, the honeybee instead waits for the predator, having earlier detected traces of its pheremonal hunting signals. As a hornet approaches the nest in an attempt to kill honeybees, a hundred or so will guard the nest entrance in an attempt to draw it on. When the hornet enters the nest, it is immediately mobbed by a clump of approximately 500 honeybees, which, surprisingly, do not sting the hornet to death as previously thought (Schmidt-Nielsen 2001). Instead, the bees heat themselves up to 47 degrees C very quickly using their flight muscles. As the hornetís upper lethal temperature is 44-46 degrees C, it is killed quickly, effectively baked to death by the large clump of bees. The Japanese honeybee displays an amazing defensive adaptation, using its already extant endothermic qualities as an effective defense mechanism against their natural predator, the giant hornet (Ono et al 1995).
    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

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    Quote Originally Posted by zaren
    those were european honeybees....they don't have any natural defence against the japanese giant hornets.

    the japanese honeybees, OTOH, have developed an ingenious defence against their perennial foe:

    The Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) has a unique way of defeating its sympatric predator, the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). The Japanese honeybee is a small creature with a correspondingly small sting; as its primary means of defense cannot inflict much damage against such a large predator as the giant hornet, it requires another method of defense (Ono et al 1995). Instead of utilizing its stinger against the pack-hunting hornet, the honeybee instead waits for the predator, having earlier detected traces of its pheremonal hunting signals. As a hornet approaches the nest in an attempt to kill honeybees, a hundred or so will guard the nest entrance in an attempt to draw it on. When the hornet enters the nest, it is immediately mobbed by a clump of approximately 500 honeybees, which, surprisingly, do not sting the hornet to death as previously thought (Schmidt-Nielsen 2001). Instead, the bees heat themselves up to 47 degrees C very quickly using their flight muscles. As the hornetís upper lethal temperature is 44-46 degrees C, it is killed quickly, effectively baked to death by the large clump of bees. The Japanese honeybee displays an amazing defensive adaptation, using its already extant endothermic qualities as an effective defense mechanism against their natural predator, the giant hornet (Ono et al 1995).
    I cannot imagine a more useless piece of trivia, but I am totally captivated reading that article above.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by zaren
    ...When the hornet enters the nest, it is immediately mobbed by a clump of approximately 500 honeybees...
    One principle - the advantage of overwhelming large numbers.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ah Pao
    One principle - the advantage of overwhelming large numbers.
    err...but in this case, the bees lost leh.

  19. #19

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    this is real cool man... almost MTV style.. as though the whole scene was cheorographed like that

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    sad ..

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