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Thread: Malaysian Road Rules

  1. #1
    Senior Member UncleFai's Avatar
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    Default Malaysian Road Rules

    I found this through my friend sharing it on FB. I think it is written by one "Paul Hobbs": https://www.facebook.com/PaulWFHobbs...577173?fref=nf

    So what is your experience on Malaysian road as a Singaporean driver? So far, mine quite ok leh.

    -----------------------------------
    Malaysian road rules

    A guide for expatriate drivers in Malaysia

    Since arriving in Malaysia in 1997, I have tried on many occasions to buy a copy of the Malaysian road rules, but have come to the conclusion that no such publication exists (or if it does, it has been out of print for years). Therefore after carefully observing the driving habits of Malaysian drivers, I believe I have at last worked out the rules of the road in Malaysia. For the benefit of other expatriates living in Malaysia, and the 50% of local drivers who acquired their driving licences without taking a driving test, I am pleased to share my knowledge below:

    Q: What is the most important rule of the road in Malaysia?

    A: The most important rule is that you must arrive at your destination ahead of the car in front of you. This is the sacrosanct rule of driving in Malaysia. All other rules are subservient to this rule.

    Q: What side of the road should you drive on in Malaysia?

    A: 99.7% of cars drive on the left hand side, 0.2% on the right hand side, and 0.1% drive in reverse (be on the look out for drivers reversing at high speed in the left hand lane of freeways, having just missed their exit).

    Therefore on the basis of 'majority rules', it is recommended that you drive on the left. However, be aware that only 90% of motorcyclists travel on the left hand side - the other 10% ride in the opposite direction or on the sidewalk. Fortunately, motorcyclists traveling in reverse are rarely seen.

    Q: What are the white lines on the roads?

    A: These are known as lane markers and were used by the British in the colonial days to help them drive straight after consuming their gin and tonics. Today their purpose is mainly decorative, although a double white line is used to indicate a place that is popular to overtake.

    Q: When can I use the emergency lane?

    A: You can use the emergency lane for any emergency, e.g. you are late for work, you left the toaster plugged in at home, you are bursting to go to the toilet, you have a toothache or you have just dropped a hot latte in your lap. As it is an emergency, you may drive at twice the speed of the other cars on the road.

    Q: Do traffic lights have the same meaning as in other countries?

    A: Not quite. Green is the same – that means “Go”, but amber and red are different. Amber means “Go like hell” and red means “Stop if there is traffic coming in the other direction or if there is a policeman on the corner”. Otherwise red means the same as green. Note that for buses, red lights do not take effect until five seconds after the light has changed.

    Q: What does the sign “Jalan Sehala” mean?

    A: This means “One Way Street” and indicates a street where the traffic is required to travel in one direction. The arrow on the sign indicates the preferred direction of the traffic flow, but is not compulsory. If the traffic is not flowing in the direction in which you wish to travel, then reversing in that direction is the best option.

    Q: What does the sign “Berhenti” mean?

    A: This means “Stop”, and is used to indicate a junction where there is a possibility that you may have to stop if you cannot fool the cars on the road that you are entering into thinking that you are not going to stop.

    Q: What does the sign “Beri Laluan” mean?

    A: This means “Give Way”, and is used to indicate a junction where the cars on the road that you are entering will give way to you provided you avoid all eye contact with them and you can fool them into thinking that you have not seen them.

    Q: What does the sign “Dilarang Masuk” mean?

    A: This means “No Entry”. However, when used on exit ramps in multi-storey car parks, it has an alternative meaning which is: “Short cut to the next level up”.

    Q: What does the sign “Pandu Cermat” mean?

    A: This means “Drive Smartly”, and is placed along highways to remind drivers that they should never leave more than one car length between them and the car in front, irrespective of what speed they are driving. This is to ensure that other cars cannot cut in front of you and thus prevent you from achieving the primary objective of driving in Malaysia, and that is to arrive ahead of the car in front of you. If you can see the rear number plate of the car in front of you, then you are not driving close enough.

    Q: What is the speed limit in Malaysia?

    A: The concept of a speed limit is unknown in Malaysia.

    Q: So what are the round signs on the highways with the numbers, 60, 80 and 110?

    A: This is the amount of the ‘on-the-spot’ fine (in ringgits - the local currency) that you have to pay to the police if you are stopped on that stretch of the highway. Note that for expatriates or locals driving Mercedes or BMWs, the on-the-spot fine is double the amount shown on the sign.

    Q: Where do you pay the ‘on-the-spot’ fine?

    A: As the name suggests, you pay it ‘on-the-spot’ to the policeman who has stopped you. You will be asked to place your driving licence on the policeman's notebook that he will hand to you through the window of your car. You will note that there is a spot on the cover of the notebook. Neatly fold the amount of your fine into four, place the fine on the spot, and then cover it with your driving licence so that it cannot be seen. Pass it carefully to the policeman. Then, with a David Copperfield movement of his hands, he will make your money disappear. It is not necessary to applaud.

    Q: But isn’t this a bribe?

    A: Oh pleeease, go and wash your mouth out. What do you want? A traffic ticket? Yes, you can request one of those instead, but it will cost you twice the price, forms to fill out, cheques to write, envelopes to mail, and then three months later when you are advised that your fine was never received, more forms to fill out, a trip to the police station, a trip to the bank, a trip back to the police station, and maybe then you will wish you had paid ‘on-the-spot’.

    Q: But what if I haven’t broken any road rules?

    A: It is not common practice in Malaysia to stop motorists for breaking road rules (because nobody is really sure what they are). The most common reasons for being stopped are:
    (a) the policeman is hungry and would like you to buy him lunch;
    (b) the policeman has run out of petrol and needs some money to get back to the station;
    (c) you look like a generous person who would like to make a donation to the police welfare fund; or
    (d) you are driving an expensive car which means you can afford to make a donation to the police welfare fund.

    Q: Does my car require a roadworthy certificate before I can drive it in Malaysia?

    A: No, roadworthy certificates are not required in Malaysia. However there are certain other statutory requirements that must be fulfilled before your car can be driven in Malaysia. Firstly, you must ensure that your windscreen is at least 50% obscured with English football club decals, golf club membership stickers or condo parking permits. Secondly, you must place a tissue box (preferably in a white lace cover) on the back shelf of your car under the rear window. Thirdly, you must hang as many CDs or plastic ornaments from your rear vision mirror as it will support. Finally, you must place a Garfield doll with suction caps on one of your windows. Your car will then be ready to drive on Malaysian roads.

    Q: What does a single yellow line along the edge of a road mean?

    A: This means parking is permitted.

    Q: What does a double yellow line along the edge of a road mean?

    A: This means double parking is permitted.

    Q: What does a yellow box with a diagonal grid of yellow lines painted on the road at a junction mean?

    A: Contrary to the understanding of some local drivers, this does not mean that diagonal parking is permitted. It indicates a junction that is grid-locked at peak hours.

    Q: Can I use my mobile phone whilst driving in Malaysia?

    A: No problem at all, but it should be noted that if you wish to use the rear-vision mirror to put on your lipstick or trim your eyebrows at the same time as you are using a mobile phone in the other hand, you should ensure that you keep an elbow free to steer the car. Alternatively, you may place a toddler on your lap and have the child steer the car whilst you are carrying out these other essential tasks.

    Q: Is it necessary to use indicator lights in Malaysia?

    A: These blinking orange lights are commonly used by newly arrived expatriate drivers to indicate they are about to change lanes. This provides a useful signal to local drivers to close up any gaps to prevent the expatriate driver from changing lanes. Therefore it is recommended that expatriate drivers adopt the local practice of avoiding all use of indicator lights. However, it is sometimes useful to turn on your left hand indicator if you want to merge right, because this confuses other drivers enabling you to take advantage of an unprotected gap in the traffic.

    Q: Why do some local drivers turn on their left hand indicator and then turn right, or turn on their right hand indicator and then turn left?

    A: This is one of the unsolved mysteries of driving in Malaysia.

    * * * * *

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by UncleFai View Post
    So what is your experience on Malaysian road as a Singaporean driver? So far, mine quite ok leh.
    The fact that you haven't disappeared like MH370 on Malaysian roads can be considered lucky.

  3. #3
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by UncleFai View Post
    I found this through my friend sharing it on FB. I think it is written by one "Paul Hobbs": https://www.facebook.com/PaulWFHobbs...577173?fref=nf
    So what is your experience on Malaysian road as a Singaporean driver? So far, mine quite ok leh.
    So far no issue with the locals over there. But there seems to be one village in the South of Malaysia with a bunch of really irritating and annoying drivers...
    EOS

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    Member Bukitimah's Avatar
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    I am a regular in JB, almost every alternate weekends or more. I don't have issues and I like the flexible parking arrangement there. Of course you will get all sorts of drivers anywhere even in Singapore. The worse are the heavy vehicles here and they fight for the road space. Being big, they will bully you and expected to given the way.

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    So far no issue with the locals over there. But there seems to be one village in the South of Malaysia with a bunch of really irritating and annoying drivers...
    Ya, agree. And the name of which starts with a S

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    What that AM said is all bullshxx.
    Been driving there quite often and on the contrary to what said, find drivers there are generally more considerate.

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    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by d2xpeter View Post
    What that AM said is all bullshxx.
    Been driving there quite often and on the contrary to what said, find drivers there are generally more considerate.
    Well, if you don't understand the concept if irony and critical jokes that's all fine. But that is no reason for such remarks.

    I can relate to a few of these points, Indonesian driver follow the same rules. Not sure who copied whom here.
    Another one to add:
    Q: Can I use the road shoulder also?
    A: Of course, it is encouraged to use any available space. Land is a scarce resource that is better used for palm oil plantations or housing projects. So if the other lanes are full just use the road shoulder to overtake or to get closer to the traffic light, which ultimately helps to achieve the main objective.
    EOS

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Well, if you don't understand the concept if irony and critical jokes that's all fine. But that is no reason for such remarks.

    I can relate to a few of these points, Indonesian driver follow the same rules. Not sure who copied whom here.
    Another one to add:
    Q: Can I use the road shoulder also?
    A: Of course, it is encouraged to use any available space. Land is a scarce resource that is better used for palm oil plantations or housing projects. So if the other lanes are full just use the road shoulder to overtake or to get closer to the traffic light, which ultimately helps to achieve the main objective.
    Ya, do you remember the irony of the iron. LOL

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    Member 9V-Orion Images's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by d2xpeter View Post
    Ya, do you remember the irony of the iron. LOL
    I shouldn't have quit smoking because your posting just gave me cancer. Again.
    CS Aviation / Flickr
    Per aspera ad astra

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Well, if you don't understand the concept if irony and critical jokes that's all fine. But that is no reason for such remarks.

    I can relate to a few of these points, Indonesian driver follow the same rules. Not sure who copied whom here.
    Another one to add:
    Q: Can I use the road shoulder also?
    A: Of course, it is encouraged to use any available space. Land is a scarce resource that is better used for palm oil plantations or housing projects. So if the other lanes are full just use the road shoulder to overtake or to get closer to the traffic light, which ultimately helps to achieve the main objective.
    What road shoulder?? It exits?

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    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by donut88 View Post
    What road shoulder?? It exits?
    If you can't see it then it's already in use
    EOS

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    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by donut88 View Post
    What road shoulder?? It exits?
    How can you miss road shoulders?


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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Jokes aside.

    For those who drives there regularly, I am told there are some unwritten courtesy among the drivers (either in front or opposite incoming) in terms of using the indicators or flashing of headlights in the highway or those main roads (eg from Kota Tinggi to Cherating or SegaMat to GamBang) to inform others.

    Scenarios

    1) You are clear to overtake me.
    2) You are not clear to overtake me (maybe there is incoming vehicles or bend)
    3) Traffic Police in front!
    4) Speed cam in front
    5)
    6)

    For the above scenarios, how are the drivers use the indicators or headlights to inform others?

    Thank You
    EisMann

  14. #14
    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    1) You are clear to overtake me = 1 flash.
    2) You are not clear to overtake me (maybe there is incoming vehicles or bend) = 2 flashes
    3) Traffic Police in front = Continous flashing and honking.
    4) Speed cam in front = 4 flashes and sticking out a camera.
    5) Policeman in front takes bribe = Wave money and thumb up sign.
    6) Policeman in front only accepts more than $100 bribe = Wave money and middle finger sign.
    Last edited by Sion; 13th June 2014 at 04:23 PM.

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by 9V-Orion Images View Post
    I shouldn't have quit smoking because your posting just gave me cancer. Again.
    Quit? Why should you quit? You really believe those shxx they said about smoking?? It is such an irony. LOL (the word again). Want to enjoy and yet scare of dying? There 1001 ways to die. Not only from smoking. Eg. Fallen trees in Singapore, suffocated to death in a train trapped in a tunnel, blah.....not to forget reading my post as one of them too. LOL.

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    If the car I front shows they are filtering right (out of their lane) but stay in the lane, he is telling you not to over take because opposite vehicle is coming. If he indicates left but stay on the lane, you can overtake BUT you still need to check it ourself. Make sure you have a clear view of what is in front of him.

    Flash is to warn you off tipping times if you have some spare cash to give away. Hehe

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    1) You are clear to overtake me = 1 flash.
    2) You are not clear to overtake me (maybe there is incoming vehicles or bend) = 2 flashes
    3) Traffic Police in front = Continous flashing and honking.
    4) Speed cam in front = 4 flashes and sticking out a camera.
    5) Policeman in front takes bribe = Wave money and thumb up sign.
    6) Pocelceman in front only accepts more than $100 bribe = Wave money and middle finger sign.

    And if the driver waves 2 coconuts? What will this mean?

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by Bukitimah View Post
    If the car I front shows they are filtering right (out of their lane) but stay in the lane, he is telling you not to over take because opposite vehicle is coming. If he indicates left but stay on the lane, you can overtake BUT you still need to check it ourself. Make sure you have a clear view of what is in front of him.

    Flash is to warn you off tipping times if you have some spare cash to give away. Hehe

    Thanks Bukit Timah!

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by EisMann View Post
    And if the driver waves 2 coconuts? What will this mean?
    That means you are entering the Bermuda Triangle and you will be gone like MH370

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    Default Re: Malaysian Road Rules

    Quote Originally Posted by EisMann View Post
    And if the driver waves 2 coconuts? What will this mean?
    Beautiful and curvy policewoman in front.

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