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Thread: UV filter and Skylight filter

  1. #1

    Default UV filter and Skylight filter

    Hi all,
    hope you guys can lend this noob some pointers about this

    seen both the HOYA skylight and UV filter,
    i was wondering what difference will they give under a normal outdoor condition and if there is any pointers to bear in mind for night shots

    thank you

    cheers
    alex

  2. #2
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    digital or film?

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    Default fil

    Quote Originally Posted by fuse
    Hi all,
    hope you guys can lend this noob some pointers about this

    seen both the HOYA skylight and UV filter,
    i was wondering what difference will they give under a normal outdoor condition and if there is any pointers to bear in mind for night shots

    thank you

    cheers
    alex
    UV quite neutral. means almost no colour change in photo.
    skylight means very slightly warmer colour in photo. warmer means reds come out redder.
    skylight filters come in two grades.
    skylight 1A and skylight 1B.
    again, one is warmer than the other.

    easy to tell by looking at filter.
    skylight is very light pinkish.

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    Does that means that the UV filter can be taken out if shooting indoors?

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    Hee.. I'm not very good at explaining but it's roughly like this..

    Filters as the name implies, filters outsomething..

    So for UV filter, it filters out UV, which is blue.. can also be used to filter out fog.. The amt of filter depends one which grade u buy.. 1A or 1B. UV is good for landscapes, etc

    For skylight, it filters out more blue than UV, giving the photo a warmer cast.. good for portraits or people shooting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by huggable
    Does that means that the UV filter can be taken out if shooting indoors?
    Well, u can shoot w/o any filters.. in fact some photographers will prefer to shoot w/o any filters..

    Most of us simply use UV and the difference is very slight and we use it more to protect the lens from getting scratches or fingerprints. Cheaper to replace the filter than the whole lens rite?

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    Roger that, thanks for the explainations!

  8. #8

    Default ...

    for me, i just buy a polarizer. whether it is the most ex, $280 or the cheapest abt $50 bucks, they protect the lenses and reduce reflection and stuff. so, polarizer is like do all, unless u r very particular...

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    you have a polariser on your lens all the time as a front element protector?
    “How fortunate for leaders that men do not think.” - Adolf Hitler

  10. #10

    Default ...

    ya... i use the cheap one abt $50 for everyday shots... and only if i got some impt stuff then use the $280 de...

    most of my frens do that... protect ur lenses...

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    Huggable is using a UV filter only as protection. Isn't it advisable not to stack filters?

    Quote Originally Posted by yanyewkay
    you have a polariser on your lens all the time as a front element protector?
    Last edited by huggable; 5th July 2005 at 02:36 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Lyn
    ya... i use the cheap one abt $50 for everyday shots... and only if i got some impt stuff then use the $280 de...

    most of my frens do that... protect ur lenses...
    You should be protecting your lense with a UV/ NC/ Skylight filter, not a polariser...

  13. #13

    Default ..hmm

    i dono but ya.. maybe.. it varies la.. most of my frens uses a polarizer or nd filter...

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    ND filter to protect lens?

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    Default ..

    ya... y does everyone sounds so surprised ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Lyn
    ya... y does everyone sounds so surprised ??
    cos Circular Poloriser or ND can affect your photos alot... and also make it harder to shoot unless u'r out in the bright sunlight...

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Lyn
    ya... y does everyone sounds so surprised ??
    LOL

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Lyn
    ya... y does everyone sounds so surprised ??
    dun u find it difficult to shoot in low light then esp?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Lyn
    ya... y does everyone sounds so surprised ??
    Well, it is not technically wrong to use any filter to protect your lenses. CirPl filter has its purpose in photography, some already mentioned by yourself. ND filter has its purpose as well. It generally reduced the amount of light entering the lens. These 2 types of filters will reduce either in shutter speed or close down the aperture, if you know what i mean. So, basically they aren't recommended for normal photo taking unless you know that you need it to achieve a certain result in your photo.

    Many of us use UV or Skylight filter to protect our lenses but of course we know why we want to use them. It is cheap and only reduces very minimum amount of light from entering the lens. For example, a 50mm lens will fit with a Skylight filter because I use this lens 90% for portraiture photography and a 17-35mm lens with a UV filter because I use it 90% for landscape photography.

    We basically want to use filters that will not reduce too much light from entering the lens.

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    thanks for sharing...learn something frm here liao..
    arigato
    Last edited by walker; 5th July 2005 at 05:20 PM.

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