Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Which setup will have faster shutter speed?

  1. #21
    Senior Member alwaysjerricky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    +65
    Posts
    2,016

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    Thanks for the explanation bro. But I think point 2 about why APS-C having less noise is not totally accurate. Light collected per square unit of sensor is theoretically the same. The reason why a smaller sensor might exhibit more noise than a larger sensor has more to do with pixel density.
    Hmm then what's the reason for it? I'm curious to know as well

  2. #22
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lil red dot
    Posts
    21,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Which setup will have faster shutter speed?

    Quote Originally Posted by alwaysjerricky View Post
    Hmm then what's the reason for it? I'm curious to know as well
    Several factors actually... this sums it up the best:

    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...ensor-size.htm
    PIXEL SIZE: NOISE LEVELS & DYNAMIC RANGE

    Larger sensors generally also have larger pixels (although this is not always the case), which give them the potential to produce lower image noise and have a higher dynamic range. Dynamic range describes the range of tones which a sensor can capture below when a pixel becomes completely white, but yet above when texture is indiscernible from background noise (near black). Since larger pixels have a greater volume — and thus a greater range of photon capacity — these generally have a higher dynamic range.

    Further, larger pixels receive a greater flux of photons during a given exposure time (at the same f-stop), so their light signal is much stronger. For a given amount of background noise, this produces a higher signal to noise ratio — and thus a smoother

    This is not always the case however, because the amount of background noise also depends on sensor manufacturing process and how efficiently the camera extracts tonal information from each pixel (without introducing additional noise). In general though, the above trend holds true. Another aspect to consider is that even if two sensors have the same apparent noise when viewed at 100%, the sensor with the higher pixel count will produce a cleaner looking final print. This is because the noise gets enlarged less for the higher pixel count sensor (for a given print size), therefore this noise has a higher frequency and thus appears finer grained.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_noise
    Effects of sensor size

    The size of the image sensor, or effective light collection area per pixel sensor, is the largest determinant of signal levels that determine signal-to-noise ratio and hence apparent noise levels, assuming the aperture area is proportional to sensor area, or that the f-number or focal-plane illuminance is held constant. That is, for a constant f-number, the sensitivity of an imager scales roughly with the sensor area, so larger sensors typically create lower noise images than smaller sensors. In the case of images bright enough to be in the shot noise limited regime, when the image is scaled to the same size on screen, or printed at the same size, the pixel count makes little difference to perceptible noise levels – the noise depends primarily on sensor area, not how this area is divided into pixels. For images at lower signal levels (higher ISO settings), where read noise (noise floor) is significant, more pixels within a given sensor area will make the image noisier if the per pixel read noise is the same.

    For instance, the noise level produced by a Four Thirds sensor at ISO 800 is roughly equivalent to that produced by a full frame sensor (with roughly four times the area) at ISO 3200, and that produced by a 1/2.5" compact camera sensor (with roughly 1/16 the area) at ISO 100. This ability to produce acceptable images at higher sensitivities is a major factor driving the adoption of DSLR cameras, which tend to use larger sensors than compacts. An example shows a DSLR sensor at ISO 400 creating less noise than a point-and-shoot sensor at ISO 100.[18]

    Sensor fill factor
    The image sensor has individual photosites to collect light from a given area. Not all areas of the sensor are used to collect light, due to other circuitry. A higher fill factor of a sensor causes more light to be collected, allowing for better ISO performance based on sensor size.[19]

    Sensor heat
    Temperature can also have an effect on the amount of noise produced by an image sensor due to leakage. With this in mind, it is known that DSLRs will produce more noise during summer than winter.
    Of course, there are other factors as well. Photosites can be made to be more efficient (more sensitive). microlenses can be made to bend more light in. layout of of sensor pixels rearranged to better use the wafer real estate. different arrangement of different color photosites to make noise look less patterned. Sensor made to operate at less heat. semiconductor circuitry made even smaller to increase size of photosite. etc etc etc etc...

    Which is why you see different performances of different generations of sensor chips.

    Also resolution is a double edged sword. The more pixels you have, the finer the noise will look (less noise)... but the smaller the pixels, the smaller the photosites giving more noise... it is a big big balancing act.
    Last edited by daredevil123; 24th March 2014 at 08:27 PM.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Which setup will have faster shutter speed?

    i think field of view plays a part too.
    even though same ISO,same aperture and focusing on the same point but if the field of view is not the same,it may affect the exposure thus affecting the shutter speed. Please correct me if iam wrong.

  4. #24
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lil red dot
    Posts
    21,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Which setup will have faster shutter speed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Turbonetics View Post
    i think field of view plays a part too.
    even though same ISO,same aperture and focusing on the same point but if the field of view is not the same,it may affect the exposure thus affecting the shutter speed. Please correct me if iam wrong.
    yup... that is one point no one mentioned. That, coupled with differences in metering methods and component differences, makes a practical test almost impossible.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Which setup will have faster shutter speed?

    Quote Originally Posted by daredevil123 View Post
    yup... that is one point no one mentioned. That, coupled with differences in metering methods and component differences, makes a practical test almost impossible.

    Thanks for confirmation

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •