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Thread: PS CS2 videocard requirement

  1. #1

    Exclamation PS CS2 videocard requirement - official minimum requirement

    This kinda just in from Adobe: A 128mb videocard is minimum for optimum performance with CS2. The article seems to hint that the more vram (i.e., more than 128mb) the merrier, which is kinda a first for me when it comes to 2D application requirements.

    http://www.adobe.com/support/techdocs/331412.html

    So it seems that my trusty G550 with 32mb on board is now long in the tooth, and what of my notebook with only 8mb of vram? Amazing...............
    Last edited by kahheng; 17th June 2005 at 09:32 AM.

  2. #2
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    Haha... yea I agree, a video card is neccessary but its the computer RAM that's more important right?
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickmak
    Haha... yea I agree, a video card is neccessary but its the computer RAM that's more important right?
    You've missed the point of this tech article
    Last edited by kahheng; 16th June 2005 at 10:52 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member jnet6's Avatar
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    IF not.. can reduce or disable the hardware acceleration in Windows by
    To disable or reduce graphics hardware acceleration in Windows XP:

    1. Choose Start > Control Panel > Display.

    2. Click the Settings tab.

    3. Click Advanced.

    4. Do one of the following:

    -- To disable hardware acceleration, move the Hardware acceleration slider to None.

    -- To reduce hardware acceleration, move the Hardware acceleration slider to a setting between None and Full.

    5. Click Apply and then click OK to accept the new setting and close the dialog box.

    6. Restart Windows and Photoshop.

    or upgrade to a GPU with 128mb and above.

    __________________________________________________ ___________________
    A GPU with higher ram is necessary due to it will not stress the CPU(main processor) too much. thus will make yr processing much faster.(same logic when it come to playing graphic intensive game)
    imagine a different process for each job.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnet6
    A GPU with higher ram is necessary due to it will not stress the CPU(main processor) too much. thus will make yr processing much faster.(same logic when it come to playing graphic intensive game)
    imagine a different process for each job.
    This vram factor has been crucial with 3D apps and games, certainly. AFAIK, such a large GPU RAM requirement is a first for Photoshop.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by kahheng
    This kinda just in from Adobe: A 128mb videocard is minimum for optimum performance with CS2. The article seems to hint that the more vram (i.e., more than 128mb) the merrier, which is kinda a first for me when it comes to 2D application requirements.

    http://www.adobe.com/support/techdocs/331412.html

    So it seems that my trusty G550 with 32mb on board is now long in the tooth, and what of my notebook with only 8mb of vram? Amazing...............
    That's strange. I only know that if you run the screen @ a times b pixels @ c Hz and at d colour depth, then you'll need at least abd MB on your video RAM and abcd processing pipeline on your Video ram.

    Never thought GPU plays part in 2D apps ?
    [at least til I finish my CG course 3 years ago]
    Nikon 4 & lots of hollow chunky glass

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by b18
    That's strange. I only know that if you run the screen @ a times b pixels @ c Hz and at d colour depth, then you'll need at least abd MB on your video RAM and abcd processing pipeline on your Video ram.

    Never thought GPU plays part in 2D apps ?
    [at least til I finish my CG course 3 years ago]
    THAT, precisely has been my own thinking all these years. I suppose they've changed memory management with CS2.

  8. #8

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    You need a good video card for REDRAW time, thats it. Also make sure that your video card you purchase is compatable with your callibration system.

    Slow video cards wind up with a lag between your mouse drawing and the monitor refreshing. Just as you have FPS in a game, you also have this in photoshop.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jj1987
    You need a good video card for REDRAW time, thats it. Also make sure that your video card you purchase is compatable with your callibration system.

    Slow video cards wind up with a lag between your mouse drawing and the monitor refreshing. Just as you have FPS in a game, you also have this in photoshop.
    One thing to note is that newer FPS games [well starting from Quake 1 at least ] uses CPU and GPU resources and the dlls from your favourite 3D library [DX or OpenGL] , whilst with PS CS2 they are only drawing 2D images hence image generation is done on the CPU side not on the GPU.

    CAD application is another different ball game as CAD is mostly 3D wireframe and rendered to make a 3D object.

    O well .. dun bother .. just plug in those 256 MB Matrox .. they are quite cheap anyway
    Nikon 4 & lots of hollow chunky glass

  10. #10

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    Im not sure how that would play into photoshop, because I can assure you that I have a dual monitor setup, and If I drag the image to my secondary monitor the redraw time gets noticably slower. You need a 60mb+ file for my 64mb Radeon secondary to start lagging however. With my panoramic drum scans (300+mb) even the 256mb card has some lag (although minimal).

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jj1987
    Im not sure how that would play into photoshop, because I can assure you that I have a dual monitor setup, and If I drag the image to my secondary monitor the redraw time gets noticably slower. You need a 60mb+ file for my 64mb Radeon secondary to start lagging however. With my panoramic drum scans (300+mb) even the 256mb card has some lag (although minimal).
    You do realised a graphic image when compressed [ TIFF or JPEG ] expand when they are opened in your favourite imaging s/ware ?

    Have you ever open a 800x600 JPG file in a 486 DX2 / 66 with 32 RAM machine ? I still remember that day when I was impressed a computer can display such a 'fine' image :P

    Hence the lag is caused by the image filling up the system RAM and swap memory [try using 8 GB RAM on WinXP x64 .. you'll notice it won't lag as much ]

    + you are using a Radeon .. not Matrox cards .. unless its pumped with hi speed DDR3 RAM .. you will notice the difference.
    Nikon 4 & lots of hollow chunky glass

  12. #12

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    You may encounter performance or redraw issues in Adobe Photoshop CS2 if you run it on a computer that has an older video card installed or that uses an older video card driver because of the increased demand in Photoshop for system resources. Older video cards use slower processors and less RAM than is optimal for processing screen redraws in Photoshop
    From adobe.com
    http://www.adobe.com/support/techdocs/331412.html

  13. #13
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    still happily chugging along on my g400max.

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