Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: What lenses for food photography

  1. #1

    Default What lenses for food photography

    wat the best lense for food photography

    with my Nikon 18-70, even the 70mm, the food looks so far away.


    www.sgkueh.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Outside the Dry Box.
    Posts
    16,374

    Default

    time to play with angle and distant... dun stand a mile and shoot...
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    東京 Tokyo
    Posts
    10,916

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bingyan
    wat the best lense for food photography

    with my Nikon 18-70, even the 70mm, the food looks so far away.


    www.sgkueh.com
    huh? what were you shooting?

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Del_CtrlnoAlt
    time to play with angle and distant... dun stand a mile and shoot...
    I should say I actually stand quite near.


    Quote Originally Posted by eikin
    huh? what were you shooting?
    shooting my kueh lor!

    www.sgkueh.com
    Last edited by bingyan; 13th June 2005 at 09:05 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    try 105mm

    I suggest you go down Popular Book Store and take a look at those cake or noya kueh (cook books) and get some ideas.
    Last edited by jopel; 13th June 2005 at 09:30 PM.

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    6,601

    Default

    some do say, a TS-E lens would be ideal

  8. #8

    Default

    ermmm... just add an extension tube to allow you to focus closer... den your food will look big.

  9. #9

    Default

    A TS/E IS the solution. With a T/S lens, you can decide where your focal plane lies relative to the food, to achieve cool in-focus/out-focus effects. All the pros generally use TS/E lenses. Only poorer photographers like us make do with others.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by data1ore
    A TS/E IS the solution. With a T/S lens, you can decide where your focal plane lies relative to the food, to achieve cool in-focus/out-focus effects. All the pros generally use TS/E lenses. Only poorer photographers like us make do with others.
    Pai seh, wats a T/S lens? very sua ku

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hongsien

    wow.. the pics here are fantastic.
    How did they get the colors to be so vibrant?
    Is it becos of the setup? Camera? Photoshop skills?
    If its all of the above, then which one played the biggest part?

    Oh, and I also dunno what a T/S lens is. Would be much appreciated if someone could explain or point out a link.

  12. #12

    Default

    do you think nikon 28-105mm is good enough?
    macro capable to 1:2, and it's a sharp lense too.....

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bingyan
    Pai seh, wats a T/S lens? very sua ku
    It is a shift len mainly use for shooting tall building. As for food...maybe I am like you learn something new. But I will stick to a normal len

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbesyeo
    wow.. the pics here are fantastic.
    How did they get the colors to be so vibrant?
    Is it becos of the setup? Camera? Photoshop skills?
    If its all of the above, then which one played the biggest part?

    Oh, and I also dunno what a T/S lens is. Would be much appreciated if someone could explain or point out a link.
    Tilt-shift lenses:

    http://www.shutterbug.net/features/0801sb_tilt/
    http://www.photo.net/photo/canon/tilt-shift

  15. #15

    Default

    For Nikon users, it's call the Perspective Control lens. the 85mm can be found here

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    3,612

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbesyeo
    wow.. the pics here are fantastic.
    How did they get the colors to be so vibrant?
    Is it becos of the setup? Camera? Photoshop skills?
    If its all of the above, then which one played the biggest part?

    Oh, and I also dunno what a T/S lens is. Would be much appreciated if someone could explain or point out a link.
    He is a cook himself, so he knows how to present the food.....styling is the most important part I found out myself, can take hours to do it if you are not experienced (like me), and still be not satisfied with the result! But experience will learn..........read many (cooking) books and lighting books too.

    He uses macro lenses, but you can do with extension tubes lah! Also, not necessary to use tilt lenses..........macro lenses have shallow depth of field by nature, especially the longer focal length ones (100mm and above). Unless you want to stand a distance and still have that shallow depth of field, you can use a Tilt (and shift) lens...........

    Tilting is to change the plane of focus from vertical (normal position) to any direction you want (up to a vertain limit)..........

    Good luck!

    HS

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •