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Thread: Is there a big diff compare being a singaporean, a pr, or a foreigner

  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by ennui
    i think that certain policies are biased towards the foreign talents and against the foreign workers (there is a difference here) which has left quite a bad taste in many pple's mouth(livelihood).
    I don't quite get the livelihood argument. Workers compete for existing jobs, but talent may lead to the creation of new jobs. That's why most if not all countries put a premium on educational background and professional qualifications for PRs/immigrants. For example, look at the eligibility guidelines for an employment-based US green card here: http://uscis.gov/graphics/howdoi/ImmStatEmp.htm

    these policies are so prevalent that i don't even wanna get started on those obscene education grants given out or the preferential treatment NUS is giving to those foreign 'scholars'.
    I heard virtually the same rant last week from an American colleague, whining about how undeserving Asian students took away places at American universities from the locals.

  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by ennui
    why does the govt preach racial tolerance? why not racial harmony?
    Last time I checked, Singapore's "shared values" used the wording "racial harmony", not "tolerance".

  3. #143

    Lightbulb

    our so-called 'racial harmony' is not tested, maybe superficial, at best. whether our racial policies to-date are working is anyone's guess. recalled about J I's arrests, to avoid finger pointing a particular racial group, efforts were put in. the authorities saw the need, but did they nip it in the bud? i do not know.


    Quote Originally Posted by Hommie
    Dear all, let rest this topic. There is no differents between Work-Permit PR or Citizen other than policies and politics. All are welcome no matter the color or religion. There are good and bad apples in every cross sections of any society no matter where. Remember that you represent not only you, you give people impressions of where you come from, your race, your religion, your cultures.

    Perhaps the thing we learn is tolerance. We are far from perfect but to live with three or more other cultures, races and religions, we are doing fine.....

  4. #144

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    shared-values, racial harmony ...all these has nothing to do with original post. Its about PR & S'porean, is there any big difference? Its about jobs. Its about who S'pore is for? Locals or FT?

  5. #145
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    Put in a global context, I think Singapore is in a very positive position as regards immigration and racial harmony. Europe is having serious trouble with the influx of political refugees, asylum seekers and cheap labour from Eastern Europe. The lack of physical borders is making the enforcement of any immigration policies very difficult.

    In many Western countries, there are serious racial issues. I heard on that last weekend, in a small coastal town outside of Lisbon, a gang of over 500 disaffected 2nd generation immigrant youths terrorised a beach, robbing every person enjoying their time outdoors on the beach. There are incidents of racially-motivated crimes every minute in UK and US.

    Singapore may have a few troubles but put into context they are very minor. Just like me and being called an Ang Mo!! If that's the worst it gets here then count me in for the long term!

    It's like the guy who was complaing about being overcharged 20c on the bus. If this is really a big issue then it means lots of other things aren't. People in UK don't worry about things like that - your more likely worried about being robbed or molested on the bus by some gang of binge-drinking teenagers.

  6. #146

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    I think this thread is great. I think racial harmony is abit of a joke, there are alot of underlying tensions involved. But put in perspective, I think we're not so bad.

    I'd like to take this moment to raise an idea among us photographers
    How do you think we can use our photographic talent as a voice to show how we feel about issues related to our society?

  7. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_nebula
    shared-values, racial harmony ...all these has nothing to do with original post.
    I think there is a connection. It is how we define "them" vs. "us".

    Its about PR & S'porean, is there any big difference?
    When it comes to rights and responsibilities, there is. When it comes to how we look at people, I would hope that people are judged no more by the colour of their IC card than by the colour of their skin.

  8. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattlock
    I think this thread is great. I think racial harmony is abit of a joke, there are alot of underlying tensions involved. But put in perspective, I think we're not so bad.
    There's some motivation to continually improve beyond "not so bad". Let me illustrate with something I noticed before I decided to come to Singapore:

    Americans pledge allegiance to a piece of cloth and a status quo which is, per dogma, the incarnation of a set of ideals. To maintain this status quo, America's society is very static and doesn't progress much - an "ideal" society doesn't need any changes or further evolution.

    Singaporeans pledge themselves as a united nation with the goal of building (i.e., working towards) an ideal society. The society here is, per mandate, dynamic - and it gives citizens and PRs alike a goal worthy of contributing to.

    How do you think we can use our photographic talent as a voice to show how we feel about issues related to our society?
    That may be difficult for people who feel that a lot of the issues are (or should be) non-issues ...

  9. #149
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    Singaporeans, look at some of your "neighbours". "Some" of the citizens there are treated differently. Discriminated in almost every sector.

    You've many reasons to be a happy citizen here

  10. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    There's some motivation to continually improve beyond "not so bad". Let me illustrate with something I noticed before I decided to come to Singapore:

    Americans pledge allegiance to a piece of cloth and a status quo which is, per dogma, the incarnation of a set of ideals. To maintain this status quo, America's society is very static and doesn't progress much - an "ideal" society doesn't need any changes or further evolution.

    Singaporeans pledge themselves as a united nation with the goal of building (i.e., working towards) an ideal society. The society here is, per mandate, dynamic - and it gives citizens and PRs alike a goal worthy of contributing to.

    That may be difficult for people who feel that a lot of the issues are (or should be) non-issues ...

    interesting.
    what I noticed in the US was more of a pledge for the goal of self-satisfaction and happiness
    This is something alot of americans I meet truly believe in with passion
    also, many people in the US raise their voices about things they feel are important. alot of bitching about the status quo in the US, that's for sure.

    the pledge singaporeans take seem to be more of just something we've learnt since primary school.
    There is no way to define clearly an ideal society, this is something that's been analyzed in many different ways by writers and philosophers.

    I refer to the whole outrage at the GST hike a year or two ago...that caused the government to backtrack and stagger the hike. issues are non-issues until enough attention is drawn to it right?

  11. #151

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    just out of curiosity, would there be anyone here who can speak Bengali and would be interested in working on a photo project involving foreign workers?

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