View Poll Results: Where would you go on from here?

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  • Use it as long as possible. When its time to upgrade, I will upgrade.

    11 78.57%
  • Never! I will get a new PPC Mac now. Take care of it and use it till kingdom cometh!

    3 21.43%
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Thread: With Steve Job's coup de'grace...

  1. #1
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    Default With Steve Job's coup de'grace...

    All of you PowerPC Mac users, report in and tell us of your future roadmap.

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    Moderator ortega's Avatar
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    it is not about the hardware, the macintosh experience is more about software.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Hommie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ortega
    it is not about the hardware, the macintosh experience is more about software.
    Yeah man! Agree with you!


  4. #4
    ClubSNAP Admin Darren's Avatar
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    If, in 12 months time, I can get a Mac mini at roughly the same price that I paid, and which gives me tangible performance increases over the current Mac mini, I will upgrade.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Hommie's Avatar
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    Quotes from Cnet:

    CEO Steve Jobs announced Monday that Apple will gradually shift its Mac line to Intel-based chips over the next two years. The move confirms a timetable first reported by CNET News.com.

    Jobs' announcement formed the centerpiece of a keynote speech to Mac programmers attending the company's annual Worldwide Developer Conference here. The conference, expected to draw some 3,800 attendees this year, is a traditional venue for Apple product launches.

    In his speech, Jobs revealed that Apple has been developing all versions of OS X since its inception to run on Intel and PowerPC chips.

    "Mac OS X has been leading a secret double life the past five years," he said.

    The move to Intel marks a tectonic shift for Apple, which has used processors from IBM and Motorola (now Freescale Semiconductor) throughout the life of the Mac. However, the company has changed architectures before, shifting in the 1990s from Motorola's 68000 family of chips to the PowerPC architecture jointly developed by IBM and Motorola.

    Jobs also noted the significant effort required earlier this decade when Apple moved from Mac OS 9 to Mac OS X. Although the operating systems are only a digit apart, he noted that the move to a Unix-based system was a major shift. "This was a brain transplant," Jobs said.

    The CEO showed a demo of the Tiger operating system on an Intel-based machine, saying, "We've been running on an Intel system all morning."

    As for why Apple was making the shift, Jobs pointed both to past problems and to the PowerPC road map, which he said won't deliver enough performance at the low-power usages needed for powerful notebooks.

    Two years ago at the same conference, Jobs introduced the first G5-based Power Macs and promised developers that the company would have a 3GHz PowerMac within 12 months. The company still doesn't have a machine that fast. "We haven't been able to deliver," he said. Nor has Apple been able to introduce a G5-based laptop--something Jobs said "I think a lot of you would like."

    Things weren't looking better in the coming months, Jobs said, saying that IBM's PowerPC road map would only deliver about a fifth the performace per watt as a comparable Intel chip.

    Jobs said there are a lot of products Apple envisions for the coming years, but "we don't know how to build them with the future PowerPC road map."

    Jobs added that most of the necessary OS work has been done, but developers will have to do some work to make their applications work on Intel-based machines.

    Transcoding tool to the rescue
    Programs written will require various amounts of effort--from a few days of tweaking to months of rewriting--depending on the tools used to create them.

    Some software that's insulated from the underlying chips, such as widgets and Java applications, will work without modification, Jobs said.

    Going forward, Mac developers will be able to create universal binaries of their programs that will run on both types of chips.

    In the meantime, Apple has a transcoding tool called Rosetta that will allow programs written for PowerPC chips to run on Intel-based machines. "Every application is not going to be universal from Day 1," Jobs told the audience.

    A Microsoft executive said the company would create universal binaries with future versions of Office for the Mac. And Adobe Systems CEO Bruce Chizen told developers they can be "absolutely sure" his company would support Apple's transition.

    "The only question I have, Steve, is: What took you so long?" Chizen said.

    Also on Monday, Jobs said the next version of OS X, called Leopard, will be released in late 2006 or early 2007. That is the same time frame as Microsoft's next Windows update, dubbed Longhorn, he noted. Microsoft has said Longhorn will be released by late 2006.
    After Jobs' presentation, Apple Senior Vice President Phil Schiller addressed the issue of running Windows on Macs, saying there are no plans to sell or support Windows on an Intel-based Mac. "That doesn't preclude someone from running it on a Mac. They probably will," he said. "We won't do anything to preclude that."

    However, Schiller said the company does not plan to let people run Mac OS X on other computer makers' hardware. "We will not allow running Mac OS X on anything other than an Apple Mac," he said.

  6. #6

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    Sad, no more PowerBooks, ... it'll be Intelbooks ..in future. Intel chips are not RISC based so I'm not too sure if this is a good move

    Better grab your Powerbooks now.

  7. #7
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    I'll be waiting to see what impact it will have on G4 PowerBooks (especially on the 17" Mamabook) when shops start to clear stocks fanatically to await for the Intel-Macs.

    Go on guys, run out and spread the news! Spread the fear that new software will not run on old hardware and make sales plummet! Then I can own my 17" baby at a song.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ortega
    it is not about the hardware, the macintosh experience is more about software.
    Well, I was about to say "Precisely!", but...........as a former Mac user, I'd tell you that ownership of something distinctively designed is a big factor in pride of user-ship.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsbn
    All of you PowerPC Mac users, report in and tell us of your future roadmap.
    What's the big deal anyway what's inside? Most Mac users haven't even seen what's inside their computer ;-)

    As long as it looks like a Mac, and operates like a Mac, running Mac OS, should it really matter?

    Of course the coup de tat would come when Intel insists that Apple sticks an "Intel inside" logo on each box Hmm, I shall write to Intel to tell them to ensure that that's part of the agreement!!!!! Time for a mass petition!
    Last edited by kahheng; 7th June 2005 at 01:44 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Hommie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kahheng
    Well, I was about to say "Precisely!", but...........as a former Mac user, I'd tell you that ownership of something distinctively designed is a big factor in pride of user-ship.
    Have ever thought of building a Mac from ground up? Isn't that more personal than buying a ready made package customizable by only adding ram?? You can choose motherboard/hardisk brand/cpu/chasis/ combo for yourself.

  11. #11
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    Hmmm can we see Mac Clone anytime soon?

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hommie
    Have ever thought of building a Mac from ground up? Isn't that more personal than buying a ready made package customizable by only adding ram?? You can choose motherboard/hardisk brand/cpu/chasis/ combo for yourself.
    Just curious....are you a Mac user Hommie?

    Doesn't sound like you are....but my sincere apologies if you are.

    I feel the most basic joy of using a Mac is the ability to get more 'actual work' done with the computer, as opposed to 'building, trouble-shooting, repairing, and more trouble-shooting'.

    As for Apple's move to Intel chips, I just hope it doesn't change this aspect of the Mac experience. It'll be a shame indeed after what it has built itself to be in the last 5 yrs...

    Cheers...Nizz (who switched 3 yrs ago after 16 long years of suffering staring at blue screens and frozen screens and windows that I sometimes can't open)

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    The number of hours lost to troubleshooting, fustration, viruses, patches and OS exploits is a unique experience only to Windows-based PCs.

    When one gets a computer what is the main purpose? To have fun.

    Perhaps I'm getting too old in mind, but these days I can't really be bothered to help ppl DIY PCs unless they are really close friends. I juz simply point them to www.apple.com.sg/store and tell them to buy a Mac which I personally feel would worth their money in returns of productivity and efficiency.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Hommie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nizz
    Just curious....are you a Mac user Hommie?

    Doesn't sound like you are....but my sincere apologies if you are.

    I feel the most basic joy of using a Mac is the ability to get more 'actual work' done with the computer, as opposed to 'building, trouble-shooting, repairing, and more trouble-shooting'.

    As for Apple's move to Intel chips, I just hope it doesn't change this aspect of the Mac experience. It'll be a shame indeed after what it has built itself to be in the last 5 yrs...

    Cheers...Nizz (who switched 3 yrs ago after 16 long years of suffering staring at blue screens and frozen screens and windows that I sometimes can't open)
    I have, ten years of experience from my first LC II to PowerPC Centris 90mhz to G4. My usages from Photoshop ver 2 on the Mac all the way to Final Cut Pro4. My first computer is a Mac.

    Nizz, have you ever try seting up a computer from scratch? Doesn't sound like you have, but my sincere apologies if you have. Cause I have been doing it for at least as long as I have been using Mac. Have you enjoyed the sound of handbuilt computer booting up?? Its like your own baby.

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    Computer is just a tool to do my work, i dun really care as long as it works

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hommie
    I have, ten years of experience from my first LC II to PowerPC Centris 90mhz to G4. My usages from Photoshop ver 2 on the Mac all the way to Final Cut Pro4. My first computer is a Mac.

    Nizz, have you ever try seting up a computer from scratch? Doesn't sound like you have, but my sincere apologies if you have. Cause I have been doing it for at least as long as I have been using Mac. Have you enjoyed the sound of handbuilt computer booting up?? Its like your own baby.
    I believe u hate it equally when u have to do troubleshooting.

    U're prolly older than me. But still, the sadistic self-torture of cutting ur hands on poorly made casings, etc is torturous. Forget it. I'll get a Mac.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Hommie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsbn
    I believe u hate it equally when u have to do troubleshooting.
    The more satisfaction I get from solving them!

    Quote Originally Posted by jsbn
    U're prolly older than me. But still, the sadistic self-torture of cutting ur hands on poorly made casings, etc is torturous. Forget it. I'll get a Mac.
    The more satisfaction I get from setting them up!

  18. #18
    Senior Member Hommie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsbn
    U're prolly older than me.
    Maybe, or I maybe I started early becoz of my passion(Mac was the de facto for graphics)

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    Well, I just switched and I feel that sometimes, you rather have a good machine that you need not worry about too much as long as you get the job done.

    My preferred combi would be a PC desktop and a Mac Ibook or PowerBook.
    We live in an age when unnecessary things are our only necessities. - Oscar Wilde

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    Quote Originally Posted by LazerLordz
    Well, I just switched and I feel that sometimes, you rather have a good machine that you need not worry about too much as long as you get the job done.

    My preferred combi would be a PC desktop and a Mac Ibook or PowerBook.
    I agreed with u.

    why must restrict ourselves to Mac or PC right? combined power the best

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