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Thread: MBS - Long Exposure

  1. #21

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanSelvaraju View Post
    It would make more sense to be selective on the use if the clouds. I was really looking forward to getting the stretchy clouds. But unfortunately there wasn't any cloud movement at that time and yeah the cloud formation wasn't optimal.
    Using GND filter would be ideal to have stretchy skies.
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  2. #22

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanSelvaraju View Post
    Thoongeng>>>
    I see. So the cloudy sky contributed much to the overall feel of the image. That's something I'll take note of and work around in future. Thanks for pointing it out.
    And you have also underscored something that I found a lil weird when I was shooting at macritchie yesterday morning. When the sun was rising from behind the blocks, the blocks actually became darker. Shall take note that I need to choose wisely depending on the scene. Sunrise or sunset.

    Thanks again! Very valuable pointers!
    Hmm I was referring to your 'tonal differences' / 'seems a little flat' which I take it to mean not enough 'texture' on the facade of MBS. For textures you generally need light that is a bit harsher (here it was diffused by the clouds) and directional, like side-lighting (with the sun rising behind MBS it is backlighted rather than side-lighted).

    When you take photos with the sun rising behind the blocks, the problem is rather of increase of the dynamic range of the scene (the difference in brightness between the brightest and darkest areas). The camera, trying to compensate for the increasing brightness of the sky due to the appearance of the sun, exposed for the highlights thus the blocks looked darker in comparison.


    Quote Originally Posted by StarCaptain View Post
    Using GND filter would be ideal to have stretchy skies.
    Hmm I think TS is more correct in saying that there isn't any cloud movements... using GND won't help much. TS may try stacking ND filters to increase the exposure time even more, however have to think about time spent at the location and problem of hot spots on the sensor

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by thoongeng View Post

    Hmm I was referring to your 'tonal differences' / 'seems a little flat' which I take it to mean not enough 'texture' on the facade of MBS. For textures you generally need light that is a bit harsher (here it was diffused by the clouds) and directional, like side-lighting (with the sun rising behind MBS it is backlighted rather than side-lighted).

    When you take photos with the sun rising behind the blocks, the problem is rather of increase of the dynamic range of the scene (the difference in brightness between the brightest and darkest areas). The camera, trying to compensate for the increasing brightness of the sky due to the appearance of the sun, exposed for the highlights thus the blocks looked darker in comparison.

    Hmm I think TS is more correct in saying that there isn't any cloud movements... using GND won't help much. TS may try stacking ND filters to increase the exposure time even more, however have to think about time spent at the location and problem of hot spots on the sensor
    Thoongeng

    You have given me two things to seriously ponder upon

    1) identifying harsher light so as to bring out tonal differences on buildings.

    2) sun rising from beings the blocks would result in increases dynamic range. You know I had always been under the impression that it was becos of shadows cast that the foreground of the blocks becomes darker. What you have mention does make sense. Shall try to observe similar scenes.

    Thanks! Really these are things that didn't occur to me till you brought it up. Appreciate you weighing in with your thoughts. Very helpful!
    Last edited by NormanSelvaraju; 19th December 2013 at 11:12 AM.

  4. #24

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanSelvaraju View Post

    1) identifying harsher light so as to bring out tonal differences on buildings.
    I'm not good at observing for the quality of light (a lot of times for me are realised on processing my photos), this was pointed out to me by Kit during one of his outings.

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanSelvaraju View Post
    2) sun rising from beings the blocks would result in increases dynamic range. You know I had always been under the impression that it was becos of shadows cast that the foreground of the blocks becomes darker.
    If you look at the exif data of the photos you took that day you probably can see how much brighter the sky is just after the sun rises and as it continues to rise. Hmm though the shadows may also have contributed, depending on how harsh the light is... again I'm not a landscape expert just sharing whatever I know

  5. #25

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    Appreciate the sharing. I'm absolutely new at this genre. So every bit of advice is precious. Cheers!

  6. #26

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by StarCaptain View Post
    Using GND filter would be ideal to have stretchy skies.


    'stretchy' sky is contributed by the movement of clouds.

    if the clouds are not moving, you stack 10x GND filters also no use.

    primary usage of GND filter, is to balance out the brighter sky with the darker land area.

  7. #27

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by tecnica View Post
    'stretchy' sky is contributed by the movement of clouds.

    if the clouds are not moving, you stack 10x GND filters also no use.

    primary usage of GND filter, is to balance out the brighter sky with the darker land area.
    apparently starcaptain is not reading the posts made by others. and i would advise him to do so to learn more from others

    imaging having a 10-stop GND, how different the bottom and top images would appear

    and how much image degradation there would be. also, the exposure on top and bottom halves would be very much different, unless you stack those with different intensities.

    and at sunrise, getting a slower shutter speed is easy; you don't need a 10-stop. at most you'll be using a 3-stop unless you're going for those ultra-long exposures. but what benefits will that bring?

    Also, sometimes when you drag the shutter speed too long, all you see is a flat white/black patch of clouds. it all depends on the speed of the wind and movement of the clouds

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by tecnica View Post

    'stretchy' sky is contributed by the movement of clouds.

    if the clouds are not moving, you stack 10x GND filters also no use.

    primary usage of GND filter, is to balance out the brighter sky with the darker land area.
    tecnica-->noted. Thanks for sharing.

  9. #29

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by kei1309 View Post
    apparently starcaptain is not reading the posts made by others. and i would advise him to do so to learn more from others

    imaging having a 10-stop GND, how different the bottom and top images would appear

    and how much image degradation there would be. also, the exposure on top and bottom halves would be very much different, unless you stack those with different intensities.

    and at sunrise, getting a slower shutter speed is easy; you don't need a 10-stop. at most you'll be using a 3-stop unless you're going for those ultra-long exposures. but what benefits will that bring?

    Also, sometimes when you drag the shutter speed too long, all you see is a flat white/black patch of clouds. it all depends on the speed of the wind and movement of the clouds
    Kei1309 >> I've been experimenting with the nd400 filter quite a lot during my Sri Lanka trip and I've come to understand it a little better. I understand that it sometimes is overkill to have an 8 stop nd filter.

    Once instance was when I was taking a long exposure shot of a waterfall in the midafternoon. I tool the metering, made the necessary calculations to have a 30 sec exposure, screwed on my nd400 filter and took the shot. I was happy with it. Then I chanced upon another shooter at the hotel who only used a 3 stop filter to get a 2 sec exposure. There were minor differences, but both pics produced the same waterfall with silky waters.

    I understood at that point that I need not require a 8 stop nd filter to obtain some effects that I desire. I guess that I'll have to shoot more and get the hang of what diff shutter speeds get.


    Ramboda Falls Sri Lanka -
    Out of Camera No editing.
    ISO100 f22 30s


    Thanks for sharing kei1309.

    Sidenote : Correct me if I'm wrong, I then questioned my choice of having gotten an 8 stop filter since a 3 stop could have done the job in this case. But after thinking, I realize that the 8 stop filter allows me more flexibility by letting me have a 2 sec exposure if I require.
    Last edited by NormanSelvaraju; 28th December 2013 at 12:02 PM.

  10. #30

    Default Re: MBS - Long Exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanSelvaraju View Post
    Kei1309 >> I've been experimenting with the nd400 filter quite a lot during my Sri Lanka trip and I've come to understand it a little better. I understand that it sometimes is overkill to have an 8 stop nd filter.

    Once instance was when I was taking a long exposure shot of a waterfall in the midafternoon. I tool the metering, made the necessary calculations to have a 30 sec exposure, screwed on my nd400 filter and took the shot. I was happy with it. Then I chanced upon another shooter at the hotel who only used a 3 stop filter to get a 2 sec exposure. There were minor differences, but both pics produced the same waterfall with silky waters.

    I understood at that point that I need not require a 8 stop nd filter to obtain some effects that I desire. I guess that I'll have to shoot more and get the hang of what diff shutter speeds get.


    Ramboda Falls Sri Lanka -
    Out of Camera No editing.
    ISO100 f22 30s


    Thanks for sharing kei1309.

    Sidenote : Correct me if I'm wrong, I then questioned my choice of having gotten an 8 stop filter since a 3 stop could have done the job in this case. But after thinking, I realize that the 8 stop filter allows me more flexibility by letting me have a 2 sec exposure if I require.
    Your waterfall example, you probably just want to control the duration of the exposure to have "just enough" silky water but still with some definition to the water, not a total wash out.

  11. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by polar28 View Post

    Your waterfall example, you probably just want to control the duration of the exposure to have "just enough" silky water but still with some definition to the water, not a total wash out.
    Exactly.

    Like the others mentioned above, too long and it appears washed-out.

    @Norman, at 30 seconds you probably lost the streaks of water flowing whilst at 2 seconds the other guy got it

    But this doesn't mean that an 8-stop ND filter is useless. How much motion blur/detail retention would also depend on how fast the object moves.

    If the water flows slowly, of course a longer exposure would be better.

  12. #32

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by polar28 View Post

    Your waterfall example, you probably just want to control the duration of the exposure to have "just enough" silky water but still with some definition to the water, not a total wash out.
    Polar28 -- noted. Shall try it again with diff shutter speeds to see the differences. Thanks for the advice!

  13. #33

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kei1309 View Post

    Exactly.

    Like the others mentioned above, too long and it appears washed-out.

    @Norman, at 30 seconds you probably lost the streaks of water flowing whilst at 2 seconds the other guy got it

    But this doesn't mean that an 8-stop ND filter is useless. How much motion blur/detail retention would also depend on how fast the object moves.

    If the water flows slowly, of course a longer exposure would be better.
    Kei1309-- thanks for the advice. I'll go try out various shutter speeds to better understand the relationships. Thanks!

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