Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: external flash underexposing problem

  1. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MDZ2
    What I meant by that was that if you allow the camera to automatically detect the flash, it will set the shutter and aperture automatically.
    i thought that this only happens when you use Program mode right? i usually use aperture or shutter priority...and if lighting situations permit, full manual...
    fz20 x sync can go all the way to 1/250. tried that a couple of times for macro, not for conventional event taking though...

    Quote Originally Posted by MDZ2
    For point 3, I meant to set the flash settings to match the camera. ie. if camera is auto set to F2.8 @ iso 100, then set the flash to that same setting as well. So if the pic still under or over exposes, you can set the flash ev setting to over or under compensate accordingly. This removes the confusion of what aperture setting to use for the cam or flash, each time you take a pic.
    you mean some flashes have dedicated FEC settings with a flick of a switch?
    alternatively, i can adjust for one over or one under manually on the cam or flash itself, rite?
    too many shots...

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Eastern Part
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Not all external flash has it. I am not sure but I thought all Metz had this function. I am using a Nikon SB26. This flash has got ISO, Aperture as well as Zoom settings. Of course these settings are only automatically set to the Nikon camera. When used with the Panasonic, I have to manually set it to F2.8 @ISO100 since this is the setting the Panasonic sets itself when it senses an external flash is connected. To increase the flash output I simply increase the EV compensation on the flash.
    If your flash has none of these function, then I guess the only way is to set the external flash off (this will fool the camera into thinking that no external flash is connected) then manually set the camera aperture to open up more or get closer to the subject.
    Or, if your flash has a thyristor to control exposure automatically, then I assume that you can select the aperture and ISO on it. If that's the case, your aperture setting on your flash should be set smaller if you need more output. ie. if you camera is set at F2.8 then your flash should be F5.6 or more. Does this make it clearer or more confusing? If it confuses more then please disregard all that I have said thus far

  3. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Eastern Part
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mpenza
    hmm... how do you set the flash EV setting? If it's on the camera, it won't work at all. And not all flash have settings for flash exposure compensation.
    You are right. I was refering to the ones with EV compensation.
    If you are using the fully manual flash, you will basically be setting your camera and you distance of your subject based on the exposure scale on your flash. To increase (decrease) exposure of the subject, in this case, you have 3 choices:
    1. open up the aperture or decrease ISO setting of your camera (vice versa)
    2. reduce the distance to your subject. (vice versa)
    3. (place a filter eg. tissue paper in front of the flash)

    If you are using a flash with Thyristor control and only ISO settings. On top of the above techniques, you can also reduce the ISO value on the flash in relation to the ISO setting on your camera.

    What I have been trying to say all this while is this. . . If you have a fully manual flash, then the output is already fixed so the only way to adjust the exposure is to play around with the settings on the camera. But if the flash has auto exposure settngs, then it means that the amout of flash output can be adjusted. In this case you have the flexibility of playing around with either flash or camera settings. With flash that have the FEV capability, I would recommend matching all the settings between camera and flash and concentrate on changing the exposure through the FEV on the flash. This will greatly reduce confusion and exposure errors, especially if you are new to flash photography.
    Last edited by MDZ2; 6th June 2005 at 03:57 PM.

  4. #24

    Default

    thanks for the replies guys...will work around and experiment with the settings as advised.

    appreciate all the input...
    too many shots...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •