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Thread: Camera lens go flat!

  1. #1
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    Default Camera lens go flat!

    News courtesy of The Register

    Camera lenses go flat and skinny
    By Lucy Sherriff
    Published Monday 23rd May 2005 15:03 GMT

    Researchers in Quebec have developed a new lens which is extremely flat and five times thinner than a sheet of paper, that they claim will revolutionise photography. With the new technology, even the smallest of cameras would be able to take perfectly clear pictures, and even get close up to their subjects with none of the distortion associated with digital zoom.

    Tigran Galstian, an engineer and physicist at Laval University, says that the research could drastically improve the quality of pictures taken by small cameras, like those in cell phones, according to a Canadian Press report.

    The researchers added a small amount of a light-sensitive monomer to the liquid crystal in a conventional electro-optic cell. When the liquid crystal is stimulated by a laser, the monomers are stimulated to form a polymer network, with a density proportional to the amount of light falling on the surface. This also affects the orientation of the liquid crystals, and the refractive index of the cell.

    By precisely controlling the laser profile, the researchers are able to make the cell act like a lens. Varying the voltage across the lens, the researchers could change the focal length of the lens, because this alters its refractive index. By increasing the applied voltage from 1.5 to 4.5 volts, the team was able to vary the focal length by a factor of five.

    Galstian has patented his invention, and is now looking for industry support to develop the technology into a working product. He told Canadian Press: "Right now we're guessing what industry needs and we'd love to work with them on what they really want."

    Galstian and his team believe the technology could be decent competition to the liquid lens research currently underway in France.
    Come, come... DSLRs the size of P&S and P&S the size of a piece of folded paper anyone?

  2. #2
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    cool man... carrying a 1200mm in the future will be an ease.

  3. #3

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    aim further..maybe 2000mm

  4. #4

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    "The research could drastically improve the quality of pictures taken by small cameras" - I thought it was the small sensors on small cameras that are the limiting factor in picture quality.

  5. #5
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    But the price definately will not be cheap........
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reno77
    "The research could drastically improve the quality of pictures taken by small cameras" - I thought it was the small sensors on small cameras that are the limiting factor in picture quality.
    i think lens still plays a part in the photo quality if not there won't be L & G lenses.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drudkh
    i think lens still plays a part in the photo quality if not there won't be L & G lenses.
    reminds me of the new DO lens, which is still inferior to the normal lenses.

  8. #8

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    A lot of gobbledygook jargon, which usually prompts people to leave their brains at the front door.

    Light sensitive monomer stimulated by laser to form a polymer network which varies in density according to the amount of light falling on the surface, thus changing the refractive index? Good grief.

    1. I believe the focal length depends more on the curvature of the lens than the refractive index (although this does play a part).

    2. If you're using light (laser) to modulate and control the focal length of the lens, won't the light passing THROUGH the lens kinda screw things up a little? Oh, the light is NOT supposed to pass through the lens to create an image? Huh?

  9. #9

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    Hmm, looks like the reporter got some of the original facts wrong. It uses a current to modify the refractive index and lens curvature (based on further details from dpreview).

    Hope I get to eat my words, and this does not turn out to be cold fusion.
    Last edited by StreetShooter; 24th May 2005 at 11:24 PM.

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