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Thread: Attempt on capturing light trails

  1. #1
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    Default Attempt on capturing light trails

    Hi guys,

    Tried to capture light trails but this spot appears in the picture. Lens and filter is free of dust and scratches. Anyone can shed light on this?

    http://www.pbase.com/tyq/image/43690489
    Last edited by frostyIntrepid; 22nd May 2005 at 10:10 PM.

  2. #2

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    your link's not working...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkl
    your link's not working...
    thanks, it's working now

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    Quote Originally Posted by frostyIntrepid
    Tried to capture light trails but this spot appears in the picture.
    If you mean the spot to the left of the tree trunk, that is lens flare.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    If you mean the spot to the left of the tree trunk, that is lens flare.
    anything to prevent it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by frostyIntrepid
    anything to prevent it?
    You could change the framing to reduce the flare (less street lamps in the picture), or move it to a position where it is more acceptable (or even make it part of the picture), or touch it up in postprocessing. Use the simplest lens available (fewer optical elements -> fewer reflections).

    With such huge contrast in one image (bright street lamps & dark surroundings), even very weak flares become noticeable. To some extent, you just have to live with it.

  7. #7
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    Many thanks!

  8. #8
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    Sorry for quoting myself...

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    Use the simplest lens available (fewer optical elements -> fewer reflections).
    In the extreme limit, you could also use a pinhole, which - in principle - is completely flare-free. (But one has to pay attention to the edges of the pinhole, as they may also scatter light.)

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    Did you have the lens hood on?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDZ2
    Did you have the lens hood on?
    Yes I did.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    You could change the framing to reduce the flare (less street lamps in the picture), or move it to a position where it is more acceptable (or even make it part of the picture), or touch it up in postprocessing. Use the simplest lens available (fewer optical elements -> fewer reflections).

    With such huge contrast in one image (bright street lamps & dark surroundings), even very weak flares become noticeable. To some extent, you just have to live with it.
    Can I add-in Cir PL to reduce flare ?
    or .. err.. this filter only can be used for noon time when the sun 90 deg
    above us ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by angmoh
    Can I add-in Cir PL to reduce flare ?
    or .. err.. this filter only can be used for noon time when the sun 90 deg
    above us ?
    Lens flare is caused by reflections at glass surfaces within the lens. Putting a filter in front of the lens adds two more surfaces that give rise to additional reflections and will most likely make things worse. (For the same reason, I would recommend to generally stay away from "protection filters", i.e. UV filters.)

    Polarization filters can help to cut down on reflected light before it enters the lens (e.g. reflections from window glass, water, or other smooth surfaces). They won't help with internal reflections.

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