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Thread: Wedding Tips...

  1. #21
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Please don't call us master, just happen that we shoot a few more weddings only.

    This is something that we can share with people here.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpenza
    setting EV to +1/2 or +1 will definitely reduce the chance for underexposure but it'll also result in overexposure and maybe result in blurness due to subject movement or camera shake! unless the bridegroom and bride are both wearing white, you shouldn't need to apply positive exposure compensation.
    I think this depends also on the lighting of the dinner location right???? If it is very dim and dark, etc???

    Beside the bride in white, etc...... I read somewhere that say it should be safe for +1/2-+1 in such situation.....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  3. #23

    Cool ...

    Can use simple terms? Don quite understand. How to set the EV?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    I think this depends also on the lighting of the dinner location right???? If it is very dim and dark, etc???

    Beside the bride in white, etc...... I read somewhere that say it should be safe for +1/2-+1 in such situation.....
    what modes (aperture priority, shutter priority, manual mode, etc) are you shooting in and are you using flash?

    if you're using any of the automated (P or auto mode for e.g.) or semiautomated modes (aperture priority, shutter priority, etc), the camera should take care of the lighting accordingly. negatives does allow you some lattitude to apply positive exposure compensation but this won't work too well with slides and digital.

  5. #25
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    for me, indoor, can safely set to manual at around 1/30 iso800 as indoor , shld be very ok.

    1/30 bcos i dun want background to be too dark.

    also, u cannot be out of range of the flash, if not subject will be dark.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpenza
    what modes (aperture priority, shutter priority, manual mode, etc) are you shooting in and are you using flash?

    if you're using any of the automated (P or auto mode for e.g.) or semiautomated modes (aperture priority, shutter priority, etc), the camera should take care of the lighting accordingly. negatives does allow you some lattitude to apply positive exposure compensation but this won't work too well with slides and digital.
    I think that time, I was using P...... but that came out underexpose..... I was using 400 film... and only have myself to blame for that..... Which I find it not so right... as 400 should be fine... I thought..... so only use fill in flash.... thought not too much flash to spoil the mood... sigh...
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halfmoon
    I think that time, I was using P...... but that came out underexpose..... I was using 400 film... and only have myself to blame for that..... Which I find it not so right... as 400 should be fine... I thought..... so only use fill in flash.... thought not too much flash to spoil the mood... sigh...
    My analysis:
    You're using P mode with flash, which fixed the shutter speed at 1/60s (that's the behaviour on my EOS 5). When you increase the exposure compensation, the camera will try to use a wider aperture. However, because the environment is dark, the combination of 1/60s and the wider aperture at ISO 400 is still not enough to capture the ambient lighting and flash is needed to provide the main source of illumination.

    3 possibilities:
    1. You use fill-in flash by applying -ve flash exposure compensation. As a result, the flash output is not able to provide sufficient illumination to properly expose the scene, hence you get underexposed pics.

    2. You simply fire the flash without applying any flash exposure compensation and the subject is out of flash range. As the suject is out of flash range, the pics will be underexposed.

    3. You simply fire the flash without applying any flash exposure compensation and the subject is within flash range. Reason for underexposure could be inaccurate metering of the flash (e.g. the flash metering is biased on the focus point which happens to be on the white gown, leading to reduced flash output and underexposed pics).

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by eikin
    trigger_lim, heed these, tips from masters
    Eikin, don't call me master lah, pia sey, just some friendly advise to a fellow CSer.
    I get paid more shooting part time ...... damn, I should find more time to shoot part time

  9. #29
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpenza
    My analysis:
    You're using P mode with flash, which fixed the shutter speed at 1/60s (that's the behaviour on my EOS 5). When you increase the exposure compensation, the camera will try to use a wider aperture. However, because the environment is dark, the combination of 1/60s and the wider aperture at ISO 400 is still not enough to capture the ambient lighting and flash is needed to provide the main source of illumination.

    3 possibilities:
    1. You use fill-in flash by applying -ve flash exposure compensation. As a result, the flash output is not able to provide sufficient illumination to properly expose the scene, hence you get underexposed pics.

    2. You simply fire the flash without applying any flash exposure compensation and the subject is out of flash range. As the suject is out of flash range, the pics will be underexposed.

    3. You simply fire the flash without applying any flash exposure compensation and the subject is within flash range. Reason for underexposure could be inaccurate metering of the flash (e.g. the flash metering is biased on the focus point which happens to be on the white gown, leading to reduced flash output and underexposed pics).
    Thanks Mpenza for your analysis..... Guess using an external flash is REQUIRED in future for such events......

    I think the 3rd one more possible..... since bride is in white.... so the exposure reading could have been off due to her gown..... careless of me....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

  10. #30
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    Usually for weddings, if I have the luxury of time, I would focus on the face and that would give generally proper exposure.
    Last edited by mpenza; 18th May 2005 at 02:06 PM.

  11. #31
    Senior Member Halfmoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpenza
    Usually for weddings, if I have the luxury of time, I would focus on the face and that would give generally proper exposure.
    I had a lot of time... that time, was not aware of the white could be a big problem for me... sigh.....
    Art is perception; Perception is art.

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