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Thread: Hiking Kit for 5D4N with D60 plus 2 lenses

  1. #1

    Default Hiking Kit for 5D4N with D60 plus 2 lenses

    Hi Experts,

    need your advice as I prep for the trip. I am going hiking in New Zealand (Milford Sound). It will be 5D4N hike. I will need to carry all equipment except tent (stay in mountain hut) and food (cooked by hut lodgers). Covering 20km average per day.

    I need advise on :

    (a) Appropriate backpack (abt 30L) and appropriate weight.
    (b) Camera bag (D60 + 2 lenses)
    (c) which other lense (I have a EF 28-105mm)

    The watch word is to keep it light and mobile.


    Lionel

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Hiking Kit for 5D4N with D60 plus 2 lenses

    Originally posted by Java_Guru
    Hi Experts,

    need your advice as I prep for the trip. I am going hiking in New Zealand (Milford Sound). It will be 5D4N hike. I will need to carry all equipment except tent (stay in mountain hut) and food (cooked by hut lodgers). Covering 20km average per day.

    I need advise on :

    (a) Appropriate backpack (abt 30L) and appropriate weight.
    (b) Camera bag (D60 + 2 lenses)
    (c) which other lense (I have a EF 28-105mm)

    The watch word is to keep it light and mobile.

    Lionel
    Leave battery grip at home. Use just the 28-105. Better still, just buy/borrow/steal a Ricoh GR-1V. Can't get more compact than that.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3
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    would the Lowepro Mini Trekker be enough? That would fit the camera bicely with a few pockets to spare for accessories. However, there might not be a lot of space for non-camera stuff.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  4. #4

    Default

    how are you going to charge batt in the mountains ? batt will lose power fast when at cold places.
    36frames Wedding Photography - http://www.36frames.com
    rueyloon - http://www.rueyloon.com

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by rueyloon
    how are you going to charge batt in the mountains ? batt will lose power fast when at cold places.
    the camera is using lithium battery right? that should hold charge pretty well..... but there's definitely case for bringing backups
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  6. #6

    Default

    Originally posted by mpenza


    the camera is using lithium battery right? that should hold charge pretty well..... but there's definitely case for bringing backups
    I have 2 batts for the D60. But each mountain hut has electricity That is why it is causing a bomb. I could use some advice on this kinda of treking trips. Like how to sling, hold camera etc.

    The D60 and 28-105 is not light leh!!!

  7. #7

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    woah... good for you.. can hike in new zealand! must post your pics here when you return!!

    why you want 30L... is this a daypack?

    okay. you want light weight, then i suggest you take a analogue camera lah.... seriously, i hike with my eos300 with 28-105usm. it is/has what i need 95% of the time. If not, then take a 28-200 lens.

    my usual set up for a dayhike:
    tatkonka (bikelight??) - its abt 20L capacity. it allows me to bring 2L of water, one camera body+lens+film+mini tripod +filters..etc.. plus some food and warm piece of clothing.
    if i don't use my camera, i will put in the bag and wrap it around with the warm clothing for protection. you can separate the lens from body if you want it even more compact...

  8. #8

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    I have to carry toiletries and clothes with me. Also, bad weather gear (it can sleet/snow). I think I will need more than 20L.

    Originally posted by beachbum
    woah... good for you.. can hike in new zealand! must post your pics here when you return!!

    why you want 30L... is this a daypack?

    okay. you want light weight, then i suggest you take a analogue camera lah.... seriously, i hike with my eos300 with 28-105usm. it is/has what i need 95% of the time. If not, then take a 28-200 lens.

    my usual set up for a dayhike:
    tatkonka (bikelight??) - its abt 20L capacity. it allows me to bring 2L of water, one camera body+lens+film+mini tripod +filters..etc.. plus some food and warm piece of clothing.
    if i don't use my camera, i will put in the bag and wrap it around with the warm clothing for protection. you can separate the lens from body if you want it even more compact...

  9. #9
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    S&F Rover AW seems to be able to meet your needs:

    http://www.lowepro.com/pages/series/street/rover.htm

    A very versatile, two-compartment backpack that comes with the S&F Deluxe Waistbelt and Shoulder Harness. Stow SLR camera gear in the bottom compartment; extras like outerwear and lunch on top. There's a padded camera insert which you can remove so you can use the S&F Rover AW as a traditional backpack.
    patented All Weather Coverô for extra protection


    *center divider folds away to create a single compartment

    *bungee cord web for stability and additional storage

    *attachment loops take optional SlipLockô add-ons

    *includes a pull-out tripod holder and mesh side pockets
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  10. #10

    Default Re: Hiking Kit for 5D4N with D60 plus 2 lenses

    Originally posted by Java_Guru
    Hi Experts,

    need your advice as I prep for the trip. I am going hiking in New Zealand (Milford Sound). It will be 5D4N hike. I will need to carry all equipment except tent (stay in mountain hut) and food (cooked by hut lodgers). Covering 20km average per day.

    I need advise on :

    (a) Appropriate backpack (abt 30L) and appropriate weight.
    (b) Camera bag (D60 + 2 lenses)
    (c) which other lense (I have a EF 28-105mm)

    The watch word is to keep it light and mobile.

    Lionel
    Not an expert, but my $0.02 :

    Do your homework on the place you're hiking. Whats the weather like? Rainy? Cold? Bring appropriate (raincoat/jacket etc) & adequate (dry socks/underwear etc) clothings; yes, for hiking/trekking, watch word is always light & mobile, but don't forget the other impt word : safety. Take care of your body first, otherwise you can't take photos!
    Once you have these "essentials", whats the volume/weight? By then, you may be thinking, do I need 2 lens? Do I want that tripod, or can I settle for that hiking pole with monopod head? Finally, from the stuff that you have shortlisted, you probably have an idea what bag you'll need!
    Well, I did not answer your qns, but hope it helped anyway

    ..NuTs..

  11. #11
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    Wah Java Guru.....I envy u!!!

  12. #12

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    Anyone want to come, welcome to join me.

    Hike cost : 1500. Fully guided, accomodation and cooking done for you. Just hike with your gear.

    Plan cost : abt 1200.

    Location : Milford Sound.


    I think I will go by Cathay Photo for a look this weekend.

  13. #13

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    Do they have an online writeup/brochure for this fully guided hike? Where to get more info? For future considerations....
    Thanks.

    ..NuTs..

    Originally posted by Java_Guru
    Anyone want to come, welcome to join me.

    Hike cost : 1500. Fully guided, accomodation and cooking done for you. Just hike with your gear.

    Plan cost : abt 1200.

    Location : Milford Sound.


    I think I will go by Cathay Photo for a look this weekend.

  14. #14
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    Hiyaa, Java_Guru,

    I'm going on a 4D3N tour next month... can I borrow your D60

    Long time no see. Still remember Software Clinic?

    :Later,

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    I will suggest that you bring lots of batteries. I just came back for NZ last week, Milford was one of the places I visited. My trip from Te Anau to Milford Sound and back was about 8 hrs. Just this short 8 hrs, shooting about a 100 shots I have used up 8 x AA 1850 Sanyo and 4 x Rayovac 1600 batteries for my S602!!! The temperature then was about 2 to 7.

  16. #16

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    Check out a book called the Backpacker's Guide to Photography.... i think that's the title. It's more for film cameras but i'm sure you can get some useful information from it. The book advises you on what equipment to bring (both camera and camping stuff), bags to use, how to care for your equipment in different kinds of conditions, etc. . Just search for which library branch has it and go borrow it.

    I think lumious-landscape.com also has some info on hiking with digital cameras if i remember correctly.

  17. #17
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    Greeting Java_Guru,

    I echo what NuTs said above - a little homework never hurt anybody.

    But just my additional 2 Yens worth, your greatest challenge will be the weather - and it's effects on you and your equipment.

    1. Keep everything warm
    The cold drains batteries like no tomorrow. And the last thing you want is to carry 4 sets of dead batteries (dead weight) up a 20km trek and not take any photos. It's not funny. So keep them warm. A good way to do this would be to keep them in some unused socks, or within some thick clothes in your day bag. Make sure they're easily assessible though.

    Depending on the heating facilities of the 'mountain hut', you might have to sleep in your sleeping bag as well. Batteries left in your camera, out in the cold drains too. Sleep with your charged batteries (while they're in your unused socks) if you have to. Heck, sleep with your camera if you have to.


    2. Be aware of sudden temperature changes
    You don't get much of these in Singapore - unless you move in and out of an air-conditioned rooms - but if that 'mountain hut' of yours is very cosy and you intend to start snapping the moment you step out of the hut, think twice. Chances are your lenses will fog up. Happened to me many times. Make sure you allow sufficient time for the camera to adjust to the outside temperature first.


    3. Never forget your cleaning kit
    This is very much like your rifle cleaning kit. You never know when you're gonna need it, but you'd be mighty glad you brought them along when you DO need it.


    4. Have everything secured
    Chances are, you'll trek, stop and take shots. Then you'll trek some more, stop and take more shots. Well, make sure you secure everything first before you move on. It's a safety hazzard for you and your equipment to have things dangling around you. Be as compact as possible. You'll be more agile and more ready to handle situations. Here's where your back pack will come in useful. Most would have straps across your chest or your waist. Use these to secure your camera before moving off.


    Haven't been to NZ before, so am unsure about the terrain you'll be facing. And i reckon you won't be trekking through deep tropical mozzified, leech-infested rainforests, with wild boars and mouse deers going through your trash and backpacks. (but that's another story for another day)


    Prepare yourself, respect the journey and enjoy your trip!


    regards,
    rOCh

  18. #18

    Default just sharing....

    Taking care of the body comes first. some of my personal experience when hiking in temperate region where temperature can change pretty drastically e.g. 10 degrees at foot of mountain to minus 10 degree in the mountain...

    Good clothing is a must!!
    1. Good 3 Season jacket really helps!
    2. windproof/water resistant pants
    3. light weight fleece
    4. short/bermudas
    5. tight fitting t-shirt
    6. cap
    7. gloves

    hiking in the mountains probably involves walking in the forest most of the time. it will be sheltered from the wind and it is usally pretty damp (since you are going in spring). You will perspire pretty badly. The only time you will not perspire is when you stop for a meal. You can literally hike in just t-shirts and bermudas because the trees offer shelter from the wind. And you will need tons of water too... having a waterpack on your back helps to cool you down, it also helps to keep the water marginally warmer, so that when you drink it, you won't be loosing excessive heat.

    Boots
    considering the load that you may carry + yourself and the type of terrain (a lot of gravels, rocks, snow....)
    the more rocky the terrain, the more torsional rigidity needed. Also if you have to climb, walk in snow, a hard toe cap is needed to dig into the harden snow. i would personally go for a mid-weight boot.... as it is not too cumbersome when walking on trial and harddy enough for snow trekking.

  19. #19

    Default

    THx for the many helpful advice from all of u. Some clarifications :

    (a) Batts with Cold.
    The Mountain Hut has electricity. That is why it is so expensive. I will probably recharge every night. THe BP511 is rather good.
    Pinoy - can borrow your extra BP511?

    (b) Hiking boots.
    Hmm...thinking of using my army boots. They are really swell for hiking.

    (c) Cold weather gear.
    I have full complement of gear from my skiing. Fleece and Windproof gortex breaker. Pls wool hat.

  20. #20
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    buy some OEM BP-511 as backup? think they cost around $45 each.

    guess you're fully prepared. have fun!
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

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