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Thread: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

  1. #1

    Question Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    This was shot by tilting the lens (10-22mm) downwards.
    TS-E can straighten the edges of the background buildings but how about the 2 ugly grey triangles at the bottom. Actually sides of the HDB walls.
    Can a TS-E lens remove the sides by the tilt action? Or will it in the process worsen the keystone of background buildings?




  2. #2
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    the widest TS-E lens is 17mm,
    to correct
    keystone distortion is using the shift, but only to a certain degree.

    when you using the 10-22mm lens to shoot this scene, aiming the lens straight without tilting the lens downwards, do you see the two walls in your frame?
    if yes, then the TS-E lens is 17mm will still see two walls on the both sides, it may not able to shift much to show the old shophouse at the lower part of the frame.
    anyway, you can go and rent a 17mm
    TS-E lens and 5D to try it out
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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    This is an issue with the position of the camera.

    You are having "reverse" keystone effect. That means you camera was tilting downwards. If you want to exclude the walls then why tilt the camera downwards to begin with? You are standing on elevated ground so keystone effects can be easily corrected without using T/S lenses. All you need to do is set the camera levelled. Levelling you camera will exclude a large portion of the walls from the frame.

    With a wide angle, its normal to have some foreground objects. To exclude them, you have to set up your camera as close to the edge of the building as you possibly can. You might even have to find a way to mount the camera on top of the parapet wall. Either that or use a longer focal length.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Thanks for the comments. Have gotten myself a 6D hence the question. I am going to do a lot of reshoots of various locations to get a feel of the difference.

    The location in question, the walls are quite extruded from the edge I am at. I cannot use longer focal as this will exclude much of the foreground. I have to tilt the lens as its only at this height I can get the perspective with the shops and the bits of the lights from the streets in between. Any higher or lower to get the background buildings straight will be to the detriment of the foreground. Ideally to the rid of the 2 triangles I probably have to suspend myself in the air a good 5-6 feet from the edge. This was shot at 13mm on crop (so ~21mm FF equivalent), was considering whether possible to get a better shot by cropping from 17mm TS-E on FF.

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    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    if you shot this with 13mm focal length on a 1.6 crop, 17mm TS-E lens on a full frame body will be much wider.

    agree with Kit, find a way to mount camera on the
    parapet wall instead of on the tripod, it makes lot of difference some time.
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    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    CamInit - I may not grasp the whole situation based on your description - but correct me if I'm wrong:

    1. You want the background buildings straight
    2. You want the X at the bottom in the foreground, but you have to tilt down to get it

    If that's the case, then to get 1 and 2 all you have to do is go down a few floors from where you are.. That's the power of perspective. By moving lower, you WILL lose some separation between the different levels of buildings but it really won't change that much. I've shot this before, so here's a link to show that it can be done. You will have to include the edge of the building protrusion that you're in though, but I don't view it as problematic personally. http://www.flickr.com/photos/night86mare/4783153402/

    Having knowledge that this is taken from the corridor of public housing, this is definitely possible and you do not have to go out to spend money on a TS-E lens when all that is needed is a short walk down a few flights of stairs (or the slow slow lift, if you prefer that).

    Alternatively, if you MUST exclude that little protrusion - then go as low as you can, without having the protrusion appear in frame, and then get a tripod with very tall legs (such that you can have one leg OVER the ledge in this case), and extend the centre column as high as you can go, and stitch a panorama consisting of vertical frames if need be (suspect it will be needed). Cheers!
    Last edited by edutilos-; 16th August 2013 at 11:35 AM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    I was aiming at the "diamond" shape formed by the shophouses in the foreground with the streets (being the edges of the diamond) lighted up, hence I cannot go down lower floors which will obscure the view of the streets further away. I walked up and down the floors several times and find this is the best height. The main thing I was wondering was a TS-E can rid of the 2 triangle parts jutting in from both sides of the frame which really annoying. To get the background vertical is more of a bonus if a TS-E could do it along the way.

    Hmm... I think I'll just have to re-visit the spot and see whether anything else could be done.

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    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    If the verticals are not important, it is more of tripod management. How far you can extend your camera out forward into the "space" will determine how much of the triangle parts are gotten rid of.

    The trouble here is that the parapet here is very high - not many tripods will be able to do this (maybe Manfrotto 055, or even larger tripods).

    What I have done before for certain problematic locations (e.g. Duxton) is to use my tripod as a "boom" and dial up the ISO. Shoot with timer and hold and hope that there is no er, boom-shake. At your own risk of course. With the improved implementation of Live View in cameras these days, it is not that hard to ensure that you have roughly the framing you want.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Quote Originally Posted by CamInit View Post
    Thanks for the comments. Have gotten myself a 6D hence the question. I am going to do a lot of reshoots of various locations to get a feel of the difference.

    The location in question, the walls are quite extruded from the edge I am at. I cannot use longer focal as this will exclude much of the foreground. I have to tilt the lens as its only at this height I can get the perspective with the shops and the bits of the lights from the streets in between. Any higher or lower to get the background buildings straight will be to the detriment of the foreground. Ideally to the rid of the 2 triangles I probably have to suspend myself in the air a good 5-6 feet from the edge. This was shot at 13mm on crop (so ~21mm FF equivalent), was considering whether possible to get a better shot by cropping from 17mm TS-E on FF.
    You did not mention all these before.

    I think the best is still find a spot as close to the edge of the building as possible. The closer to the edge you get, the better the chances of excluding the building walls. There might be some cropping of the edges. You might end up with a vertical pano.

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    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    I was going to sueest getting one of those clamps from Manfrotto but there isn't any railings you can use.


    city from heartland by arkitectural photography, on Flickr

    What I would do is to try to lean the tripod as close to the parapet was possible. Depending on how tall you are, you might have to set the camera up to your eye level or higher. If you have one of those Gitzo Explorer type tripod which comes with a horizontal bar, that could be useful. You don't have to extend 5 to 6 feet out. Most of the time, all it takes is minute adjustments. Frame the shot handheld. Once you find that angle, try to replicate the position with the tripod.

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    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    this is my set up for mounting camera on railing.

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    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Sir, what lens is that mounted on your camera? Is it the Samyang TS lens?

    Thanks in advance,

    Daniel

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    this is my set up for mounting camera on railing.


  13. #13
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oracle0711 View Post
    Sir, what lens is that mounted on your camera? Is it the Samyang TS lens?

    Thanks in advance,

    Daniel
    Yes, you are correct.
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    Senior Member ricleo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    Yes, you are correct.
    Ho's the performance of the samyang TS?
    A7R3|V12|V15|FE28|MS17|MS35|MS50|50lux|50C|50Artis an|FD85L|FE85|90 cron|
    Σ24|35L|Σ50|135L|70-200G2

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    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    I don't have a change to make some comparison with Nikon 24 TS lens side by side,
    so base on my personal, unscientific observation, this need to stop down to f8 and above for better quality, there are some barrel distortion, since there is no lens profile for TS lens and not that easy for correction if you use shift.
    but this is only half price of a Nikon TS lens, so can't demand too much about this lens.
    anyway, I'm using it mainly for timelapse, the results are acceptable.
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    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Thank you! That has been helpful. It looks like I might have to stick with the Canon's Mark II version.

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    I don't have a change to make some comparison with Nikon 24 TS lens side by side,
    so base on my personal, unscientific observation, this need to stop down to f8 and above for better quality, there are some barrel distortion, since there is no lens profile for TS lens and not that easy for correction if you use shift.
    but this is only half price of a Nikon TS lens, so can't demand too much about this lens.
    anyway, I'm using it mainly for timelapse, the results are acceptable.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    I tink for folks who are already using he TS-E and PC-E 24mm, they should continue using those. The Samyang would be a good choice for those thinking of using T/S lenses but were being put off by the relatively high prices. Another group of users who I think might be interested in this would be the Sony FF users. If I'm correct, they have not dedicated T/S lenses, discounting mount modification options.

    Looks like we have 3 T/S 24mm between us. Want to do a review of all 3?

  18. #18
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    this is my set up for mounting camera on railing.

    some members might be interested to know the set up I use to mount my camera on the railing;

    My set up consist of three parts,
    a Manfrotto super clamp, a Manfrotto Head mounting plate and a Sirui G20 Ball head.

    The set up is very stable, I can shoot timelapse with this.


    The super clamp can be found in major camera stores
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ing_Plate.html


    This parts is not easy to obtain here, hence I order mine online.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...lamp_with.html






    currently I looking for a solution to mount camera on parapet wall, as not all places have railing, might consider welding a bracket onto a F clamp, any suggestions?
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  19. #19
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Think either an F clamp or G clamp will work. You need to fix the threaded stud onto it. Perhaps with welding. Just remember that typical parapet walls are about 120mm to 150mm thick so the clamps must be big enough.

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    Senior Member shierwin's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: Will a TS-E lens help in this case?

    Quote Originally Posted by CamInit View Post
    Thanks for the comments. Have gotten myself a 6D hence the question. I am going to do a lot of reshoots of various locations to get a feel of the difference.

    The location in question, the walls are quite extruded from the edge I am at. I cannot use longer focal as this will exclude much of the foreground. I have to tilt the lens as its only at this height I can get the perspective with the shops and the bits of the lights from the streets in between. Any higher or lower to get the background buildings straight will be to the detriment of the foreground. Ideally to the rid of the 2 triangles I probably have to suspend myself in the air a good 5-6 feet from the edge. This was shot at 13mm on crop (so ~21mm FF equivalent), was considering whether possible to get a better shot by cropping from 17mm TS-E on FF.
    Use manfrotto xpro series tripod (190 or 055), setting the centre column to horizontal, and adjust the legs such that 2 legs will be against the parapet wall. And use liveview to compose and remote to trip shutter.
    Last edited by shierwin; 19th August 2013 at 01:30 PM.

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