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Thread: how long can i keep a exposed negative ?

  1. #1
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    Default how long can i keep a exposed negative ?

    i plan to go somewhere far from my place to develop so i was thinking like keep a few roll let say 5 roll then go develop . So i would like to seek help from those more experience photographers here how long can i keep the exposed negative ? keep in the freezer extend the quality ???

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    You can put in the fridge but not the freezer to reduce colour changes. Unless you are so particular about colour shifts you will not bother to keep them from being developed immediately because once you open up the plastic cannister you are basically "killing" the film itself, slowly.

    That is for slower speed film, for faster ones like ISO 800 and up, recommended to send asap. So far my ISO 100 film has no noticable changes after I put it in the fridge for 2-3 weeks before I get it processed.

  3. #3
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    i have a few that i keep for a month already i think so is it too late to throw into fridge now ?

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    I bet there are colour shifts already, but most of us should not be able to see the difference unless the film is way over expired.

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    lol ... hope not much . anyway doing scanning so might be able to PS back the colour

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    For what it's worth, unless you are shooting in a highly stable (specialised studio) environment in terms of colour temperature and using correction filters then you are unlikely to notice colour changes with most modern film emulsions. To further complicate matters most studio flash units have an acceptable colour temperature latitude of at least 100 K and more frequently several hundred K.

    Storing film after shooting for some months is quite acceptable, just pay attention to the manufacturer's temperature ratings and keep it lower than the maximum recommended and it's a good idea to store used film in ziploc bags with the air sucked out of them. Keep them in a light fast container helps as light leakage is not unknown with cannisters.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
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  7. #7

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    Ideally, you should process any exposed film within 48 hours or less. But for professionals on overseas assignments, especially photojournalists of the past, do not have the privilege to do so. Therefore, the key factor is to keep the films away from heat or sunlight. Most carry a box cooler with them just to store films. Ziplock bags (especially freezer type) are great. I use all sizes to store my films.

    In Singapore, you may want to store your films (exposed and unexposed) in the fridge. Also, never leave your film inside a vehicle under hot sun.
    Last edited by photobum; 3rd May 2005 at 12:44 PM.

  8. #8
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    Thanks ! very good and detail explanation !

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