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Thread: Universities that teach Photography

  1. #21
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    James Cook University - Australia

  2. #22

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    I remember peeping into one of RMIT's darkrooms when I was there. I liked the old buildings in the campus which gave it character. Anyway I studied in Building 6 during 96-97. I missed that life since.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    i hear from my lecturers that the rmit photography degree classes have lost their darkrooms. if digital is your thing then gd for u lor.
    Yes you are right but in Melbourne there is still many Darkroom you still can rent. If you are a Black and White lover, you can built your own darkroom. When I was Melbourne, I built my own darkroom....

    All is not lost, just have to think for other alternative.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by fisheye
    Wow, we have so many RMIT alumni!

    Anyway, I want to say thanks to PHOTOBUM whom i took a private message with him about his university. I hope he doesn't mind me posting this for the benefit of all interested in more photography institutions.

    "Rochester Institue of Technology (RIT) was founded in 1829, compared to Brooks, which is about 50 years old. Therefore, education received at RIT is considered "traditional," not Brooks. Depending on your major, you'll need an average of 185 credit hours to complete a course. The tuition rates at RIT is US$491 per credit hours now. If you do the math, the total fee is US$90,835 + 15% by the time you graduate. In my opinion, Brooks is like a photography school, not an university. The institution offers diploma programs also.

    The city of Rochester is about 300 miles northwest of New York City. The metropolitan city is nested in Monroe County, which is the fifth richest county in the United States. It has a population 219,000. Living pace there is much slower than Singapore's. Living costs is lower compare to both Singapore and Santa Barbara (where Brooks is). For more information about the city of Rochester, you find out at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roches...ounty,_New_York

    I have a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Advertising Photography. At RIT, a portfolio presentation for admission is not required for most photography courses. Some do ask for it, but not necessary. However, a strong portfolio is expected by the time you graduate."
    It is a dream for all photographers to joined RIT. Even me too but when you do not have that much money.....USD$90,000 is not a small sum.

    In fact, PHOTOGRAPHY is all about individuality. If you have the passion to learn, love photography and appreciate fine art work then go for it but it does need to be RIT. RIT is THE BEST uni not only get a degree/master's but if u r talented, NY major studios will head hunt for you.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pro Image
    RMIT!
    I studied photography over there.

    If you want to know more info, please drop by my studio. I can recommend my Lecturer to you. He comes to Singapore every 6 months to hunt for students from Temasek Poly.
    Hi Pro Image,

    From what you wrote, it sounds as if you were from Temasek Poly. I was a student there. Which years were you there?

    Also, which years were you in RMIT? We might actually know each other.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jemapela
    Hi Pro Image,

    From what you wrote, it sounds as if you were from Temasek Poly. I was a student there. Which years were you there?

    Also, which years were you in RMIT? We might actually know each other.
    No lar.....I am not from Temasek Poly. I am from La Salle but just before SIA took over.

    I built up my own portfolio and submit through mail at the end of 1993. About a month later they accepted me for a 3 year Degree course but I end up finishing an Honour Degree within 3 years.....which normally would take 4 years.

    1994-1996 I was in RMIT but stayed on for another 6 months before I venture to KL, Malaysia for my first job........

  7. #27

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    somehow, TISCH in NYU seems very attractive.
    http://photo.tisch.nyu.edu/page/home
    I've looked through their course syllabus and I've find it very comprehensive. but the cost of it is definitely sky-high.

    ever considered studying photography locally? Well, NTU is opening the new School of Art Media and Design and allows students to major in photography and it seems rather popular. But somehow I just don't feel very comfortable at the way they market themselves.
    http://www.ntu.edu.sg/sadm

    I too am looking out for a tertiary education. But seriously, does a degree in photography necessarily make you a better photographer. And also will it contribute to the quality of your portfolio? I'm currently doing apprenticeship at a commercial studio and I was just wondering which is better, apprenticeship or schooling?

    Please help me with my dilemma.

  8. #28

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    Nothing much to add, but thought it a bit unusual noone mentioned QCA.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by a9ape
    somehow, TISCH in NYU seems very attractive.
    http://photo.tisch.nyu.edu/page/home
    I've looked through their course syllabus and I've find it very comprehensive. but the cost of it is definitely sky-high.

    ever considered studying photography locally? Well, NTU is opening the new School of Art Media and Design and allows students to major in photography and it seems rather popular. But somehow I just don't feel very comfortable at the way they market themselves.
    http://www.ntu.edu.sg/sadm

    I too am looking out for a tertiary education. But seriously, does a degree in photography necessarily make you a better photographer. And also will it contribute to the quality of your portfolio? I'm currently doing apprenticeship at a commercial studio and I was just wondering which is better, apprenticeship or schooling?

    Please help me with my dilemma.
    Actually it's not the degree that is important in Photography but it leans towards more to how much you can adapt and absorb from it. Studying overseas is always the best as you learn totally very different style and techniques from Westerners.

    Plenty of people have this mind set/perception that when you get a degree in photography, you will be a better photographer or your skills will improve. Actually this applies to all areas in educations. Think about it. If you are lazy, nothing works for you. If the whole idea is just for the sake of getting a degree in photography, then I suggest that you don't waste your parents money.

    When you are in overseas, it's not about just getting a degree and learning photography only. It all about managing your finiance, life, meeting/interacting with people from all walks of life, working part time and MORE! When I was in Melbourne, I seldom mix with my fellow Singaporeans and Malaysians as we will be talking about the same thing. I mix with Aussies folks more.

    Australia is good place to shoot and discover on the outback. The exchange rate is cheap too compared with US.

    Studying in NTU is ok but what can you shoot on local scenes? Mixing with local people? Nah....if you have $$$$, go for it!
    Last edited by Pro Image; 15th May 2005 at 02:33 PM.

  10. #30

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    living overseas awhile definitely will make a big impact on your way of thinking
    I don't know if australia is the best place to have an overseas experience though, it's almost too "safe"
    personally I learnt more in one day from assisting on a big shoot than a few months studying for my photography degree. but being in school puts you around people who are interested in the same things and gives you access to facilities. but in this digital era you don't really need so many facilities.
    Personally I would suggest taking a good sum of money and go travel the world for half a year or more, live in various places.
    That'll probably influence your photography more than sitting in a classroom

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by fisheye
    Does anyone know which universities in Australia teach photography?
    or any in the U.S / Canada?

    I'm looking for degree programs.

    University of Michigan
    www.umich.edu

    School of Art

  12. #32

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    My alma matar Rochester Institute of technology in Rochester, New York.

    Great photography school!

  13. #33

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    yeah, i guess studying art overseas would be a great experience but i'm afriad i don't have the finances to do so. for now, i gues my plan is to complete a business degree at SMU, take another 6 more years to gather the resources and really work at my portfolio, then take fine arts overseas.
    wow. that looks like another 10 more years to go....
    thanks so much for the great advice

  14. #34

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    wah. 10 years to work towards a overseas degree in photography?
    Frankly, i think you can apprentice under some pro photographer and gain much more experience in 10 years.

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosycatus
    wah. 10 years to work towards a overseas degree in photography?
    Frankly, i think you can apprentice under some pro photographer and gain much more experience in 10 years.
    hahaha... i don't think my boss will want to hire me for so long and I don't think I'll want to hold on to a pay of apprentice for 10 years either.
    i'm giving myself 10 years cause I need to take care of the financial needs of my family first. I'm the eldest, I've got 2 lil' siblings who wanna go to uni too. Knowing the early years of a photographer is extremely tough, I wouldn't want to pull my family members down with me too. So I'd rather become financially stable first before I pursue my dreams.
    oh man... the dillemma

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