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Thread: Universities that teach Photography

  1. #1
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    Default Universities that teach Photography

    Does anyone know which universities in Australia teach photography?
    or any in the U.S / Canada?

    I'm looking for degree programs.

  2. #2

    Smile Photography Schools in the U.S.

    Quote Originally Posted by fisheye
    Does anyone know which universities in Australia teach photography?
    or any in the U.S / Canada?

    I'm looking for degree programs.
    My Alma Mater, Rochester Institute of Technology, in Rochester, New York (a.k.a home of Kodak Corporation and Fuji Xerox). www.rit.edu

    Other photography schools in the U.S., Brooks Institute of Photography (RIT's arch rival). www.brooks.edu

    There are other universities that offer dedicated courses in photograhy.

    For photojournalism, try University of Missouri in Columbia. www.missouri.edu

    For crime photography, try Central Missouri State University (a FBI affiliated institution). www.cmsu.edu
    Last edited by photobum; 1st May 2005 at 10:44 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fisheye
    Does anyone know which universities in Australia teach photography?
    or any in the U.S / Canada?

    I'm looking for degree programs.
    RMIT in Melbourne, Australia.
    --
    "High Wired, Dream Sired"

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfgang
    RMIT in Melbourne, Australia.
    eeeeeee.....

    i try out a few times there... mine held at Bundoora Campus...

    the content is goodddd.... but the guy who teaches... heheheeee....
    Stress Man @ work... :bigeyes:

  5. #5

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    do a search in the forums...this has been asked before.....

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfgang
    RMIT in Melbourne, Australia.
    The city campus has a nice classic building that houses the dept that offers a degree in photography. When I was studying in another course there, my building was just directly across. Anyway the degree programme is 3 years and it does not come cheap.

  7. #7

    Default Photography down under

    Hi all,

    If I'm correct, RMIT University is the largest university in the southern hemisphere by student numbers. It is also possibly the most prestigious university for architecture and photography in the southern hemisphere.

    Already popular with Singaporeans and many Asians, Australia would be the best alternative to studying in US or UK which are generally and relatively more expensive (in terms of currency exchange).

    Compared to just 3-4 years ago, it's more expensive to study in Australia now because the Aussie dollar has gradually risen over the Singapore dollar. Back then, it used to be almost on par.

    I don't doubt the good content of RMIT's photography course syllabus but like most academic courses, there is this hush-hush issue about them not being quite in touch with real world demands/expectations/practices/preferences (if you know what I mean - it's hard to explain).

    Learning at a course with a more commercialised school or professional photographer may actually help more in this sense.

    Anyhow, I'm happy with the textbooks RMIT uses for their photography degree course. They contain exercises/assignments for you to practise and learn (if you dilligently want to do it), and information which you can be quite assured are not made-up by self-taught "professionals".

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    Jemapela, you're a student there?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    Jemapela, you're a student there?
    Hi foxtwo,

    I was. I graduated from there.

    However, I wasn't studying photography for 2 very common reasons why most S'poreans wouldn't study arts.

    1) Arts (and sports) are not very recognised and respected in S'pore. It appears that S'pore still persists in "buying over" foreign talents in these areas and turning them into "S'porean".

    2) If parents are paying the fees, you jolly well study what they think is best for your money-earning family-raising future.

    I only bought some of their photography textbooks to read and reinforce what I self-learnt over the years. I practised my photography at studios which offered TFP, and at a private photography-teaching company which offered courses.
    Last edited by Jemapela; 3rd May 2005 at 01:13 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jemapela
    2) If parents are paying the fees, you jolly well study what they think is best for your money-earning family-raising future.
    well... you don't have to jolly well study what your parents think is best. But you jolly well should choose to excel and not disappoint them and yourself.

    fisheye: just to note, rmit might not accept you into their degree programs if you have no prior photography certification. I don't know excatly what cert you need but in my case i have to complete a 2yr dip in applied photography first before degree. If rmit appeals to you, email me, I'll try to help. Good luck to ya.

  11. #11
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    Hi Guys,

    Thans for all your input. Seems like RMIT keeps coming up.

    ::foxtwo::
    ya i'll let you know when i apply for RMIT. Sigh i dont have official photography certificates, and my dip is in mass communication. I'm still going to try though.

    ::Jemapela::
    Thanks for the RMIT infor. I work in the arts industry and I agree / disagree with you on some points, which I won't touch on since this is a photography forum. My parents are absolutely supportive of my choice of academia. And I don't see photography as a non-profiting profession either. Anyhow thanks for the suggestions, they are helpful.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    well... you don't have to jolly well study what your parents think is best. But you jolly well should choose to excel and not disappoint them and yourself.
    I could be 1 of the many spineless and gutless fellas in S'pore who conforms to parental (and social) pressure. (This is a subjective issue.)

  13. #13

    Default Pre-requisites for RMIT

    Quote Originally Posted by fisheye
    ::Jemapela::
    Thanks for the RMIT infor. I work in the arts industry and I agree / disagree with you on some points, which I won't touch on since this is a photography forum. My parents are absolutely supportive of my choice of academia. And I don't see photography as a non-profiting profession either. Anyhow thanks for the suggestions, they are helpful.
    Good for you on supportive parents.

    Whether you are able or not to put bread and butter on the table with photography really depends on many factors. It won't be easy to put them all out in this forum or thread. As long as you are aware of them, that's all that matters.

    As for your mass communication diploma, you may be able to get some advance standing with RMIT. (I'm not a staff with RMIT so I stress "may".) You can obtain a free (I'm sure it's free) copy of their prospectus (in Singapore) to check. Sometimes, there are education fairs which have Aussie university lecturers present to assess your current qualifications and give you advance standing literally on the spot.

    If RMIT advises you to obtain a diploma in photography first before enrolling into their degree program, you may want to consider RMIT TAFE (polytechnic equivalent) diploma. Alternatively, there is a Photography Studies College in Melbourne which appears to be recognised by RMIT as a pre-requisite.
    Last edited by Jemapela; 4th May 2005 at 02:10 PM.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jemapela
    Alternatively, there is a Photography Studies College in Melbourne which appears to be recognised by RMIT as a pre-requisite.
    Which colleage is that? I'm keen to know more.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowspeeder
    Which colleage is that? I'm keen to know more.
    It's called Photography Studies College, in Southbank, Melbourne.

    For those who were in Melbourne, I'm sure it's within walking distance of Southgate (because I sometimes pass by in a car).

    There may be a few others of similar standing but I've been seeing PSC ads in the newspaper often.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jemapela
    It's called Photography Studies College, in Southbank, Melbourne.

    For those who were in Melbourne, I'm sure it's within walking distance of Southgate (because I sometimes pass by in a car).

    There may be a few others of similar standing but I've been seeing PSC ads in the newspaper often.
    I was there @ RMIT city campus for 2 years and I didnt even know
    . Really was very naive and less travelled those days.

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    Just saying hi to fellow RMIT grads.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fisheye
    Does anyone know which universities in Australia teach photography?
    or any in the U.S / Canada?

    I'm looking for degree programs.
    RMIT!
    I studied photography over there. And yes it is a good uni. Plus the uni fees and staying in aust is cheaper. much much cheaper than US.

    no need to go for Photography Studies College. Just sent them your best photos and wait for their reply. if they reject, then try to get a better portfolio. I doubt they will reject if you have a decent portfolio.

    Your portfolio should consist a variation of all aspect in Photography. From landscape, portraiture, black and white, photo journalism, architecture, sports and so on. You must have at least a good command of English as well. If you only manage to only pass in your 'O' levels in English, they will ask to go for their english course.

    RMIT does not have any dorms. So you must look for your own accomodation. If you have some $$$, buy a cheap car as you will need to travel around with your equipments as they are heavy. A car is good too for protection as when you carry expensive equipments, you do not want any unwanted attention.

    If you want to know more info, please drop by my studio. I can recommend my Lecturer to you. He comes to Singapore every 6 months to hunt for students from Temasek Poly.

    Please be prepared to change your attitude towards photography courses as it is very different from the rest. It may not seem like a challange in the beginning but it's the first 2 years that you will need to struggle and cope with challange the lecturers is going to give. You learn the MOST in the this 2 years......

    I have heard plenty of changes around the Photography dept. So, be even more prepared for it. Most of the Senior lecturers have left the dept. Now it's all the younger gen that is in charge. There is a very talented guy from the States that is teaching Photoshop and anything related to digital photography. His name is Brett. He is actually a second/third year lecturer and also a Master's Program lecturer too.

    So drop me a PM if you are really serious about getting a degree in Photography. GOOD LUCK!

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    Wow, we have so many RMIT alumni!

    Anyway, I want to say thanks to PHOTOBUM whom i took a private message with him about his university. I hope he doesn't mind me posting this for the benefit of all interested in more photography institutions.

    "Rochester Institue of Technology (RIT) was founded in 1829, compared to Brooks, which is about 50 years old. Therefore, education received at RIT is considered "traditional," not Brooks. Depending on your major, you'll need an average of 185 credit hours to complete a course. The tuition rates at RIT is US$491 per credit hours now. If you do the math, the total fee is US$90,835 + 15% by the time you graduate. In my opinion, Brooks is like a photography school, not an university. The institution offers diploma programs also.

    The city of Rochester is about 300 miles northwest of New York City. The metropolitan city is nested in Monroe County, which is the fifth richest county in the United States. It has a population 219,000. Living pace there is much slower than Singapore's. Living costs is lower compare to both Singapore and Santa Barbara (where Brooks is). For more information about the city of Rochester, you find out at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roches...ounty,_New_York

    I have a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Advertising Photography. At RIT, a portfolio presentation for admission is not required for most photography courses. Some do ask for it, but not necessary. However, a strong portfolio is expected by the time you graduate."

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    i hear from my lecturers that the rmit photography degree classes have lost their darkrooms. if digital is your thing then gd for u lor.

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