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Thread: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    Which is precisely why I brought a filtered water pitcher to Egypt to filter their bottled water !
    "Those who drink unfiltered water build Pyramids" - Laozi.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    "Those who drink unfiltered water build Pyramids" - Laozi.
    "Those who built the Pyramids are dead" - Kklee


    Ancient Egypt

    With perfected methods of mummification, the ancient Egyptians, expert in Dehydration, evidenced that they were also experts in hydration as well. Paintings from the Egyptian tomb, dating back to 15th and 13th century B.C.E. clearly depicts the picture of water treatment device.

    This ancient Egyptian clarifying device was found pictured on the wall of the tomb of Amenophis II at Thebes. The inscription was carved in 1450 B.C.E.[2]

    Source - History of water filters - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    Perhaps I have missed out.
    I reply to you at 10:10.
    Your last edit was at 10:15.
    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    I am happy user of the Hyflux water pitcher and bottled distilled water.
    I was probably editing it when you quoted. Anyway, no problem.

    How do you get distilled water, RO units? While short consumption is beneficial for detox, there is health concern by long term consumption of distilled water.

    "Health effects of drinking purified water

    Distillation removes all minerals from water, and the membrane methods of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration remove most, or virtually all, minerals. This results in demineralized water which has not been proven to be healthier than drinking water. The World Health Organization investigated the health effects of demineralized water in 1980, and its experiments in humans found that demineralized water increased diuresis and the elimination of electrolytes, with decreased serum potassium concentration. Magnesium, calcium and other nutrients in water can help to protect against nutritional deficiency. Recommendations for magnesium have been put at a minimum of 10 mg/L with 20–30 mg/L optimum; for calcium a 20 mg/L minimum and a 40–80 mg/L optimum, and a total water hardness (adding magnesium and calcium) of 2–4 mmol/L. At water hardness above 5 mmol/L, higher incidence of gallstones, kidney stones, urinary stones, arthrosis, and arthropathies have been observed. For fluoride the concentration recommended for dental health is 0.5–1.0 mg/L, with a maximum guideline value of 1.5 mg/L to avoid dental fluorosis.[16]

    Water filtration devices are becoming increasingly common in households. Most of these devices do not distill water, though there continues to be an increase in consumer-oriented water distillers and reverse osmosis machines being sold and used. Municipal water supplies often add or have trace impurities at levels which are regulated to be safe for consumption. Much of these additional impurities, such as volatile organic compounds, fluoride, and an estimated 75,000+ other chemical compounds[17][18][19] are not removed through conventional filtration; however, distillation and reverse osmosis eliminate nearly all of these impurities.

    The drinking of purified water as a replacement of drinking water has been both advocated and discouraged for health reasons. Purified water lacks minerals and ions such as calcium that play key roles in biological functions such as in nervous system homeostasis, and are normally found in potable water. The lack of naturally-occurring minerals in distilled water has raised some concerns. The Journal of General Internal Medicine[20] published a study on the mineral contents of different waters available in the US. The study found that "drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of calcium, magnesium, and sodium and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals". It encouraged people to "check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs". Since distilled water is devoid of minerals, supplemental mineral intake through diet is needed to maintain proper health.

    The consumption of "hard" water (water with minerals) is associated with beneficial cardiovascular effects. As noted in the American Journal of Epidemiology, consumption of hard drinking water is negatively correlated with atherosclerotic heart disease.[21]

    Where a public water supply contains significant fluoride, naturally or added by fluoridation, people who prefer to limit fluoride intake can install filters appropriate to reduce fluoride content
    "

    source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purified_water


    I test my tap water quite frequently as I have an aquarium. Our tap water is on the soft side (o-3dH) and acidic side (~6.5).
    Last edited by ManWearPants; 15th May 2013 at 04:23 PM.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    "Those who drink unfiltered water build Pyramids" - Laozi.
    The Egyptians built a lot of aqueducts to channel water. Maybe the pyramids was built to filter water, with water sprouting from the top and then running down the sides much like in the alps. Hmmm....maybe we have offered a new explanation for the purpose of pyramids.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by edutilos- View Post
    E. Coli (cfu/100 ml, 35°C, 24 hrs) < 1 means that there are less than 1 colony forming units in 100 ml of water, after being left at 35 degrees Celsius for 24 hours.

    FYI, residual chlorine is included in drinking water to make it "biologically stable", i.e. unable to support microbial growth. There is a need for this given that the water isn't supplied direct from the waterworks and has to be conveyed via pipes, stored, etc.
    I don't know. We drink close to 2-3L of water every day. And when these bacteria enter our body of temp around 37C, will they multiple? Lab and practical scenario can be different. Afterall we are not test tubes.

    OK, I am going to check out bottled water and test for 1 month.
    Last edited by ManWearPants; 15th May 2013 at 04:24 PM.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Something to think about...


  7. #27
    Senior Member Sion's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    "Those who built the Pyramids are dead" - Kklee
    They died so that those were alive built Marina Bay Sands and Resorts World Sentosa.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by ManWearPants View Post
    I was probably editing it when you quoted. Anyway, no problem.

    How do you get distilled water, RO units? While short consumption is beneficial for detox, there is health concern by long term consumption of distilled water.

    "Health effects of drinking purified water

    Distillation removes all minerals from water, and the membrane methods of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration remove most, or virtually all, minerals. This results in demineralized water which has not been proven to be healthier than drinking water. The World Health Organization investigated the health effects of demineralized water in 1980, and its experiments in humans found that demineralized water increased diuresis and the elimination of electrolytes, with decreased serum potassium concentration. Magnesium, calcium and other nutrients in water can help to protect against nutritional deficiency. Recommendations for magnesium have been put at a minimum of 10 mg/L with 20–30 mg/L optimum; for calcium a 20 mg/L minimum and a 40–80 mg/L optimum, and a total water hardness (adding magnesium and calcium) of 2–4 mmol/L. At water hardness above 5 mmol/L, higher incidence of gallstones, kidney stones, urinary stones, arthrosis, and arthropathies have been observed. For fluoride the concentration recommended for dental health is 0.5–1.0 mg/L, with a maximum guideline value of 1.5 mg/L to avoid dental fluorosis.[16]

    Water filtration devices are becoming increasingly common in households. Most of these devices do not distill water, though there continues to be an increase in consumer-oriented water distillers and reverse osmosis machines being sold and used. Municipal water supplies often add or have trace impurities at levels which are regulated to be safe for consumption. Much of these additional impurities, such as volatile organic compounds, fluoride, and an estimated 75,000+ other chemical compounds[17][18][19] are not removed through conventional filtration; however, distillation and reverse osmosis eliminate nearly all of these impurities.

    The drinking of purified water as a replacement of drinking water has been both advocated and discouraged for health reasons. Purified water lacks minerals and ions such as calcium that play key roles in biological functions such as in nervous system homeostasis, and are normally found in potable water. The lack of naturally-occurring minerals in distilled water has raised some concerns. The Journal of General Internal Medicine[20] published a study on the mineral contents of different waters available in the US. The study found that "drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of calcium, magnesium, and sodium and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals". It encouraged people to "check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs". Since distilled water is devoid of minerals, supplemental mineral intake through diet is needed to maintain proper health.

    The consumption of "hard" water (water with minerals) is associated with beneficial cardiovascular effects. As noted in the American Journal of Epidemiology, consumption of hard drinking water is negatively correlated with atherosclerotic heart disease.[21]

    Where a public water supply contains significant fluoride, naturally or added by fluoridation, people who prefer to limit fluoride intake can install filters appropriate to reduce fluoride content
    "

    source: Purified water - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    I test my tap water quite frequently as I have an aquarium. Our tap water is on the soft side (o-3dH) and acidic side (~6.5).
    I get them off the shelf.
    I agree with the concern on long term detrimental effect but I would think it is easily replaced from diet.
    That said, I am not fully on distilled water, my consumption is mixed of filtered and distilled water.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    A note for ManWearPants:

    Pants can be used as filters in outdoor survival training.



    Mark Emery - Countryman: Denim Millbank Bag


    How To Make A Cheap Water Filter

  10. #30
    Senior Member madmartian's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    A note for ManWearPants:

    Pants can be used as filters in outdoor survival training.



    Mark Emery - Countryman: Denim Millbank Bag


    How To Make A Cheap Water Filter
    Then it'll be ManWearFilters already
    Take the shot!

  11. #31

    Default

    I can speak from personal experience

    I used to use Hyflux pitcher for home use. Now I'm switched to 3M pitcher.

    I can appreciate the taste of filtered water. It felt alot cleaner and fresher, compared to tap water.

    There is another step that some ppl will take; that is to make.the water alkaline. Lots of claims abt alkaline water benefits.

  12. #32
    Member 9V-Orion Images's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    After drinking fresh "Kopi Gao" and "Teh Tarik" out from Sungai Batu Apoi for several days in a row.

    Everything taste heavenly now.
    CS Aviation / Flickr
    Per aspera ad astra

  13. #33

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    i don't like drinking from Hdb Gin .
    Mr Lee himself won't drink. must be something inside
    宁愿遇见丢失幼崽的母熊,也不愿碰上做蠢事的愚人

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    I drink purified/filtered water. Less illness for the whole family now.
    I bought the 5 stages RO/DI water and install under the sink. All drinking water will be from this additional tap, even for boiling water.

    My current tap water TDS (total dissolve solid) reading is about 55-65ppm. After putting the filter system is about 0-2ppm.

    Stage #1: Sediment pre-filter to reduce sediment, dirt, rust particles, silt and suspended matter.
    Stage #2: Granulated Activated Carbon (GAC) pre-filter to reduce chlorine, organic chemicals, bad taste and odours.
    Stage #3: Carbon block pre-filter to further remove any residual chlorine, tastes & odours, and extending the RO membrane's life. .
    Stage #4: RO membrane to remove bacteria, virus and cysts, and reduce dissolved heavy metals and contaminants. The filtered water is stored in a diaphragm tank, also under the sink.
    Stage #5: Post-filter Granulated Activated Carbon (GAC) to remove odour and improve taste at time of usage. The final step of this water purification process "polishes" the water to make it suitable for drinking.
    Added Stage # DI - for super clean water for my marine aquarium. TDS reading is 0.0ppm.

    Stage 4 & 5 can last for years, but stage 1,2 & 3 must change the cartridges within a year. You will notice, within 3 months, the stage 1 sediment filter will turn colour from white to dark red/brown due to all the dirt/rust it trapped.
    Last edited by Rockyboy; 16th May 2013 at 08:23 AM.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by donut88 View Post
    I can speak from personal experience

    I used to use Hyflux pitcher for home use. Now I'm switched to 3M pitcher.

    I can appreciate the taste of filtered water. It felt alot cleaner and fresher, compared to tap water.

    There is another step that some ppl will take; that is to make.the water alkaline. Lots of claims abt alkaline water benefits.
    I am looking at the 3M as well.

  16. #36

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rockyboy View Post
    My current tap water TDS (total dissolve solid) reading is about 55-65ppm. After putting the filter system is about 0-2ppm.
    Can I find out how how or where the test was done and is this a service or product available for the general public ?

  17. #37

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sion View Post
    They died so that those were alive built Marina Bay Sands and Resorts World Sentosa.
    Gosh...those alive must be very old now.

  18. #38
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    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by donut88 View Post
    There is another step that some ppl will take; that is to make.the water alkaline. Lots of claims abt alkaline water benefits.
    If you look at the chart posted by kklee from PUB, the tap water is already alkaline (pH 7-9). However my pH test kit indicate otherwise (pH6.5).

    Seems like quite a few have their own secondary filtration at home. Our bro here is quite solid one which brings me to the next question. Are those miniature filters attached to tap sufficient or just a waste of money. Surely the filters would have clogged up within days. Also water needs to pass through the activated carbon slowly to be effective.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rockyboy View Post
    I drink purified/filtered water. Less illness for the whole family now.
    I bought the 5 stages RO/DI water and install under the sink. All drinking water will be from this additional tap, even for boiling water.

    My current tap water TDS (total dissolve solid) reading is about 55-65ppm. After putting the filter system is about 0-2ppm.

    Stage #1: Sediment pre-filter to reduce sediment, dirt, rust particles, silt and suspended matter.
    Stage #2: Granulated Activated Carbon (GAC) pre-filter to reduce chlorine, organic chemicals, bad taste and odours.
    Stage #3: Carbon block pre-filter to further remove any residual chlorine, tastes & odours, and extending the RO membrane's life. .
    Stage #4: RO membrane to remove bacteria, virus and cysts, and reduce dissolved heavy metals and contaminants. The filtered water is stored in a diaphragm tank, also under the sink.
    Stage #5: Post-filter Granulated Activated Carbon (GAC) to remove odour and improve taste at time of usage. The final step of this water purification process "polishes" the water to make it suitable for drinking.
    Added Stage # DI - for super clean water for my marine aquarium. TDS reading is 0.0ppm.

    Stage 4 & 5 can last for years, but stage 1,2 & 3 must change the cartridges within a year. You will notice, within 3 months, the stage 1 sediment filter will turn colour from white to dark red/brown due to all the dirt/rust it trapped.
    Last edited by ManWearPants; 16th May 2013 at 10:28 AM.

  19. #39

    Default Re: Tap and pitcher water filters...are they effective?

    Quote Originally Posted by ManWearPants View Post
    Seems like quite a few have their own secondary filtration at home. Our bro here is quite solid one which brings me to the next question. Are those miniature filters attached to tap sufficient or just a waste of money. Surely the filters would have clogged up within days. Also water needs to pass through the activated carbon slowly to be effective.
    Before the water pitcher, I use have the on-tap filters by the same company. IIRC, I changed 3 sets.
    They are effective for my needs. However, they are prone to failure which which I believe could be due to pressure and the materials used.
    I think the correct usage is not to turn the tap full blast, which is rather difficult to always remember.

  20. #40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post

    I am looking at the 3M as well.
    3M is good. They are not one of the most biggest successful company in the world for nothing. They must be doing something right.

    Having said that, hyflux is not bad actually. The problem with hyflux pitcher is the water flow is slow and the filter may not work properly if you don't know how to install properly

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