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Thread: ND Grad Filter...

  1. #1

    Default ND Grad Filter...

    Hi guys,

    I'm juz wondering if you guys use ND Grad filter when taking photo? especially landscape/sunset/sunrise where u some times need to balance the sky and land exposure?

    Somehow, i felt it's quite a necessary piece of filter...

    Anyone got any idea how much and where could i get one and brand as well? I did a quick check at CP, think they have LEE filters selling for a whopping $250!!! IIRC

    worth the investment? if not, any suggestions to get pass that problem?

  2. #2
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    Moved thread to a more appropritate location

    Ian
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    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

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    Maybe can try out the cheaper range of cokin filters? Anyway, if you are using DLSR, its possible to bracket a few shots on tripod and layer them in PS to squeeze in entire dynamic range. Nothing beats getting it right on the spot though. I'm also considering getting some LEE filters soon, didn't know they are so expensive!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gildow
    Hi guys,

    I'm juz wondering if you guys use ND Grad filter when taking photo? especially landscape/sunset/sunrise where u some times need to balance the sky and land exposure?

    Somehow, i felt it's quite a necessary piece of filter...
    yes, i do. but seldom take those kind of shots

    Quote Originally Posted by Gildow
    Anyone got any idea how much and where could i get one and brand as well? I did a quick check at CP, think they have LEE filters selling for a whopping $250!!! IIRC

    worth the investment? if not, any suggestions to get pass that problem?
    cheaper solution is cokin ND grad...
    they should have it as well

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gildow
    Hi guys,

    I'm juz wondering if you guys use ND Grad filter when taking photo? especially landscape/sunset/sunrise where u some times need to balance the sky and land exposure?

    Somehow, i felt it's quite a necessary piece of filter...

    Anyone got any idea how much and where could i get one and brand as well? I did a quick check at CP, think they have LEE filters selling for a whopping $250!!! IIRC

    worth the investment? if not, any suggestions to get pass that problem?
    I use a collection of Lee and SinghRay ND grads for a lot of my landscape and architectural work. They are worth the money if you are shooting professionally or as a very serious amateur, but be aware you may need at least 4 filters (2,3 stops, hard and soft transitions (gradient) to cover most scenarios in landscape work and that's not including coloured ND grads for specialist applications.

    Lee ND Grads are excellent quality, so are SinghRay Filters (cost up to 240 USD for 4" wide Lee fittings for standard range filters, more for custom made). If you find the price to heavy for Lee or SinghRay's then have a look at the Cokin range. Some colour shift but a lot cheaper.

    For sunset/sunrise shooting there are ways to achieve excellent results without resorting to filers. Use Centreweighted metering (not matrix) and pick your center value carefully. While the end results are not as good as when using an ND grad the end result can be outstanding if you get the exposure correct.


    You might want to check the prices at B&H in New York for Lee filters
    The Ang Moh from Hell
    Professional Photography - many are called, few are chosen!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    I use a collection of Lee and SinghRay ND grads for a lot of my landscape and architectural work. They are worth the money if you are shooting professionally or as a very serious amateur, but be aware you may need at least 4 filters (2,3 stops, hard and soft transitions (gradient) to cover most scenarios in landscape work and that's not including coloured ND grads for specialist applications.

    Lee ND Grads are excellent quality, so are SinghRay Filters (cost up to 240 USD for 4" wide Lee fittings for standard range filters, more for custom made). If you find the price to heavy for Lee or SinghRay's then have a look at the Cokin range. Some colour shift but a lot cheaper.

    For sunset/sunrise shooting there are ways to achieve excellent results without resorting to filers. Use Centreweighted metering (not matrix) and pick your center value carefully. While the end results are not as good as when using an ND grad the end result can be outstanding if you get the exposure correct.


    You might want to check the prices at B&H in New York for Lee filters
    Sorry about the wrong location posting... :P


    Seems like I'm more tempted to get the filters...I find myself getting silhouette of the foreground most of the time when trying to take shots with bright back ground/sky, either that, it's pretty wash out sky with a well exposed front subject. Did try spot metering in such cases and with help of a cir-pol filter, it does help a bit...but like the picture below...simply can't get the nice field in the foreground...

    Last edited by Gildow; 13th April 2005 at 02:16 AM.

  7. #7

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    It is good for shooting with films. For digital photography, you can apply gradual effect by graphics editor.

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    The best ND graduated I have tried throughout my 15 year of photography is Singh-Ray Galen Rowell series ND filters. They will fit onto a Cokin 'P' size holder. I feel the effect created by Singh-Ray looks more natural and real.

    By the way, you can create the same effect digitally in Photoshop. That is why I sold my Singh-Ray ND filters recently.

  9. #9

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    hmmmm..done in photoshop? Meaning to say that I would have to take 2 or more picture with different exposure settings on a tripod and then merge the layers together? (most of the time prefer hand held...guess must get use to using and carying tripod)

    Is there any other way? must consult all the gurus here already....

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    Can try shooting in RAW if using tripod is not an option. At least the dynamic range is slightly broader.

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    If I am correct the price of Lee grads are SGD 120-125 (and not the stated SGD 250, as those are the labelled prices to give you a good feeling that they are giving you a 50% discount).....bought them two years ago there....

    HS

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    Gildow,

    Nope, I do it differently. This method was mentioned in one of the Photoshop User magazine (cannot remember the exact issue).
    Last edited by photopurist; 13th April 2005 at 08:42 PM.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by photopurist
    Gildow,

    Nope, I do it differently. This method was mentioned in one of the Photoshop User magazine (cannot remember the exact issue).

    hmm...kind enough to give a brief out line... ? Photoshopo User Magazine..hmm..gotta start getting that to read...

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