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Thread: lighting techniques

  1. #1

    Lightbulb lighting techniques

    anyone wants to share the lighting techniques in the tv show 'Apprentice' on sunday?

  2. #2
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    Seems to be flood lighting (white on white).
    General strobes on the surroundings (note the white studio walls) and 1 key light for highlighting on the models so light is bounced generally to create that clean white look.

    Actually I'm more interested with the set up shown with John Clang's segment in the studio

  3. #3

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by SniperD
    Seems to be flood lighting (white on white).
    General strobes on the surroundings (note the white studio walls) and 1 key light for highlighting on the models so light is bounced generally to create that clean white look.

    Actually I'm more interested with the set up shown with John Clang's segment in the studio
    no problem. i watched it too. he was using broncolor para FF or something like that with a large rectangular softbox on the right. an angled background with the model's shadow(from para FF) thrown on it. was he shooting closer to the softbox?

    back to Apprentice. flooding the background with lights using two L shaped reflectors seems popular. the back of such reflectors was black and placed very close to the model/s. is it to create a dark edge at the model's sides?

  4. #4
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    Ahh.. hehheh the angling of the backdrop is quite an insight... creating that kind of shadow instead of the normal kind.. studio floor must be damn big to accom for that.

    The L shaped reflectors' black back acts as barn doors to shield off any excessive lights that might spill.. I'm not sure.. it's only a guess

  5. #5
    vince123123
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    hmm i missed the show, would be grateful if you can elaborate what the "angling of the backdrop" means.

    Quote Originally Posted by SniperD
    Ahh.. hehheh the angling of the backdrop is quite an insight... creating that kind of shadow instead of the normal kind.. studio floor must be damn big to accom for that.

    The L shaped reflectors' black back acts as barn doors to shield off any excessive lights that might spill.. I'm not sure.. it's only a guess

  6. #6

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by vince123123
    hmm i missed the show, would be grateful if you can elaborate what the "angling of the backdrop" means.
    let me answer. a typical upright b/g is vertical i.e. perpendicular to the floor. in john's case, it was at an angle of about 75 to 80 degrees.

  7. #7
    vince123123
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    so its leaning back or leaning front?

    and btw, whats the advantage of doing this leaning background.

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    let me answer. a typical upright b/g is vertical i.e. perpendicular to the floor. in john's case, it was at an angle of about 75 to 80 degrees.

  8. #8

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by vince123123
    so its leaning back or leaning front?

    and btw, whats the advantage of doing this leaning background.
    it was leaning back. i don't know why he did it this way. still thinking.

  9. #9
    vince123123
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    so we wait for SniperD to clarify after all he apperas to have understood the differnces in "shadow".

  10. #10

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    Pray tell what episode and season was that?

    I tried calling Starhub and they cannot tell me. They just said 202, but i am sure it is not. No re-run too.

    Perhaps those with the Starhub tv guide could help us check pls?

    Many thanks!

  11. #11

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonny
    Pray tell what episode and season was that?

    I tried calling Starhub and they cannot tell me. They just said 202, but i am sure it is not. No re-run too.

    Perhaps those with the Starhub tv guide could help us check pls?

    Many thanks!
    which tv programme/s are you referring to? i am confused with your post.

  12. #12

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    The Apprentice...

    What about the John Clang one? What prog was it?

  13. #13

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonny
    The Apprentice...

    What about the John Clang one? What prog was it?
    Pmed you.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by vince123123
    so we wait for SniperD to clarify after all he apperas to have understood the differnces in "shadow".
    Neh... I dun really understand the purpose but typically you see the normal shadow to be cast against a backdrop to be either 1) harsh shadow on background (a complete full sized shadow) or 2) a shadow that's muted and soft. or 3) a shadow that's folded in half..(dunno how to explain this one but it has to do with the angle of the backdrop)

    For John, his backdrop was sharply angled at between 60-70 degrees from the right angle of the floor... with that, the shadow of the model (Otto's his name if I recall correctly) was cast either in elongated hence enhancing the look (note that he's shooting from a lower angle oso) or eliminating the conflicting separation of shadow and model (which most of us have in a typical studio set up)

    And the angle of his para FF plays a part in creating that effect as well.

    Anyway, I still love that issue of NuYou (Sept 2004) where John did a few spreads of Otto and the colors and techniques... worth learning. In that issue, there's work by Leslie Kee, Chuan Do, Him Him, Wee Khim, Kirby Koh and Mark Law as well.. under One roof of learnable examples in Fashion shoots

    Well.. that's my 2 cts worth of thought
    Last edited by SniperD; 13th April 2005 at 05:27 PM.

  15. #15

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by SniperD
    Neh... I dun really understand the purpose but typically you see the normal shadow to be cast against a backdrop to be either 1) harsh shadow on background (a complete full sized shadow) or 2) a shadow that's muted and soft. or 3) a shadow that's folded in half..(dunno how to explain this one but it has to do with the angle of the backdrop)

    For John, his backdrop was sharply angled at between 60-70 degrees from the right angle of the floor... with that, the shadow of the model was cast either in elongated hence enhancing the look (note that he's shooting from a lower angle oso) or eliminating the conflicting separation of shadow and model (which most of us have in a typical studio set up)

    Well.. that's my 2 cts worth of thought
    let me watch the tape again later and see if i could figure it out. or PM jc. hehe!

  16. #16

    Lightbulb

    looks like this area of interest appeals to a very limited group of CSers. so esoteric?

  17. #17

    Lightbulb

    ok, the angle is more closer to 45 degrees. the shadow of the model faded to less focus or hard from legs to head.

  18. #18
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    ahhh....

  19. #19

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    ok, the angle is more closer to 45 degrees. the shadow of the model faded to less focus or hard from legs to head.
    i have a pic of the image shot off the tv. need to post? let me know.

  20. #20
    vince123123
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    that would be extremely helpful

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    i have a pic of the image shot off the tv. need to post? let me know.

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