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Thread: Sensor burn due to long exposure

  1. #41

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    Keep the sun out of the frame

    Keep the sun well out of the frame when shooting backlit subjects.
    Sunlight focused into the camera when the sun is in or close to the frame
    could cause a fire.

    Nikon D4 User's Manual - Page xiii
    serious? i've never had that problem before.

    but of course, the camera manufacturers will always try to get out of any lawsuit or payment for damages. stating that in the User's Manual will help them to escape that.

  2. #42

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    camera and lenses are just tools, it meant to be used,
    they are only useful when we make full use of it, and it is replaceable.



    and they are totally worthless if the photographer is blind, or over concern about damaging them, or don't have any time to use them.
    You have the rights to your own perception.
    My Nikon D90 is a valued gift and thus makes it not replaceable whether used or damaged.

    I share with you the website below by blind photographers.

    UCR/California Museum of Photography

  3. #43

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by kei1309 View Post
    serious? i've never had that problem before.

    but of course, the camera manufacturers will always try to get out of any lawsuit or payment for damages. stating that in the User's Manual will help them to escape that.
    Seriously, I hope I won't have.
    After having done some internet research, I didn't come up with any camera that actually caught fire.
    However, the risk is higher if one is using long focal length lenses.

  4. #44
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    I think you might have a problem if you do something like a 4 hour exposure into the sun without using any ND filters.. The ND filters will cut out the light anyways.

    You should probably care more about lasers:

    Laser safety for cameras - International Laser Display Association

  5. #45
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    You have the rights to your own perception.
    My Nikon D90 is a valued gift and thus makes it not replaceable whether used or damaged.

    I share with you the website below by blind photographers.

    UCR/California Museum of Photography
    I know where you coming from,

    how many people taking up photography and quit within a year or two?

    how many people keep shooting and shooting and shooting for 10-20 years?

    how many people still pursuit photography despite of physical handicap?

    so what is photography mean to you?
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  6. #46

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    I know where you coming from,

    how many people taking up photography and quit within a year or two? At the moment, doesn't concern me. Since you asked, you tell me ? It's good to know.

    how many people keep shooting and shooting and shooting for 10-20 years? At the moment, doesn't concern me. Since you asked, you tell me ? It's good to know.

    how many people still pursuit photography despite of physical handicap? At the moment, doesn't concern me. Since you asked, you tell me ? It's good to know.

    so what is photography mean to you? I think it doesn't concern you. Yeah?
    See above. You seem to know me more than I know myself.

  7. #47

    Default

    I don't know if my query is relevant in this thread.

    This question popped up as I was reading this thread. I'm the minority who uses sony slts. Unlike DSLRs, they use their main sensor to capture the light and display a liveview. Likewise with mirrorless cameras.

    Do they stand a higher chance of 'sensor burn'? Since the sensor is exposed to the sunlight all the time?

  8. #48

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NoS77 View Post
    I don't know if my query is relevant in this thread.

    This question popped up as I was reading this thread. I'm the minority who uses sony slts. Unlike DSLRs, they use their main sensor to capture the light and display a liveview. Likewise with mirrorless cameras.

    Do they stand a higher chance of 'sensor burn'? Since the sensor is exposed to the sunlight all the time?
    doubt there is. i've done time-lapse, video recording, 10 minute exposures into the sunset/sunrise, and so far, no issues with my cameras.

  9. #49
    Member iguanavon's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NoS77 View Post
    I don't know if my query is relevant in this thread.

    This question popped up as I was reading this thread. I'm the minority who uses sony slts. Unlike DSLRs, they use their main sensor to capture the light and display a liveview. Likewise with mirrorless cameras.

    Do they stand a higher chance of 'sensor burn'? Since the sensor is exposed to the sunlight all the time?
    I think sensor burn is unlikely... But sensor overheating due to SSS being switched on is more probable... Especially for older SLT like the A33/A55

  10. #50

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by iguanavon View Post
    I think sensor burn is unlikely... But sensor overheating due to SSS being switched on is more probable... Especially for older SLT like the A33/A55
    that's why you switched to the A99?


  11. #51
    Member iguanavon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kei1309 View Post

    that's why you switched to the A99?


    Lol

  12. #52
    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Actually I don't think sensor will get burnt that easily. However, at very long exposure, sensor will probably get heated up... and that will cause noise to occur...
    I am not a photographer, just someone who happened to have a couple of cameras.
    My lousy shots

  13. #53
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    Seriously, I hope I won't have.
    After having done some internet research, I didn't come up with any camera that actually caught fire.
    However, the risk is higher if one is using long focal length lenses.
    Exposure defines the correct and absolute amount of light that is required to record a useful image on the sensor. Google for 'Sunny 16' rule and you will get a very good baseline of exposure parameters required for that. As you can see, focal length is irrelevant. Now, use this as a baseline and take it that it's perfectly safe to record light this way. (Otherwise burned sensors would be quite common issues in Service Centers, right?) Now, what happens if you (accidentally or intentionally) increase the exposure by 3 stops (e.g. aperture of f/4 instead of f/11) keeping all other parameters constant? Three stops means that 8 times the amount of light hits the sensor now. Maybe you might still see something between all the whitewash on the picture. Your sensor is still alive and kicking, that's for sure. Will you increase the exposure further?
    Now, if you have light conditions that require an exposure of 5 minutes (e.g. night scene or by using ND filters) it means that after 5 minutes your sensor has collected the same amount of light (rays and photons) as compared to a picture on a bright sunny day in Auto Mode. Where should the sensor burning come from?
    EOS

  14. #54

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    I was wondering if using a longer focal length (like supertelephoto) to fill up the entire frame with only the sun will cause the sensor the burn up. (although this doesn't make sense composition wise, but just for discussion sake)

    It's akin to using a magnifying glass and concentrating all the energy on 1 spot. A simple magnifying glass can cause dry leaves to start burning in seconds, so would our lens do something similar? Especially longer lens.

    As for exposure time and amount, mirrorless cameras have their sensors exposed to light all the time. Thus I think the time for proper exposure would not be relevant for mirrorless cameras. DSLRs have the light reflected away when not exposing, so they should not encounter sensor burn issues as easily.

  15. #55

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Exposure defines the correct and absolute amount of light that is required to record a useful image on the sensor. Google for 'Sunny 16' rule and you will get a very good baseline of exposure parameters required for that. As you can see, focal length is irrelevant. Now, use this as a baseline and take it that it's perfectly safe to record light this way. (Otherwise burned sensors would be quite common issues in Service Centers, right?) Now, what happens if you (accidentally or intentionally) increase the exposure by 3 stops (e.g. aperture of f/4 instead of f/11) keeping all other parameters constant? Three stops means that 8 times the amount of light hits the sensor now. Maybe you might still see something between all the whitewash on the picture. Your sensor is still alive and kicking, that's for sure. Will you increase the exposure further?
    Now, if you have light conditions that require an exposure of 5 minutes (e.g. night scene or by using ND filters) it means that after 5 minutes your sensor has collected the same amount of light (rays and photons) as compared to a picture on a bright sunny day in Auto Mode. Where should the sensor burning come from?
    Camera, not sensor.

    AFAIK,
    Light includes visible light and the invisible, infrared and UV.
    Sunny16 applies to the visible spectrum.
    Usually is the invisible spectrum that causes the damages.

    I would say these would be scenario based.

  16. #56

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NoS77 View Post
    I was wondering if using a longer focal length (like supertelephoto) to fill up the entire frame with only the sun will cause the sensor the burn up. (although this doesn't make sense composition wise, but just for discussion sake)

    It's akin to using a magnifying glass and concentrating all the energy on 1 spot. A simple magnifying glass can cause dry leaves to start burning in seconds, so would our lens do something similar? Especially longer lens.

    As for exposure time and amount, mirrorless cameras have their sensors exposed to light all the time. Thus I think the time for proper exposure would not be relevant for mirrorless cameras. DSLRs have the light reflected away when not exposing, so they should not encounter sensor burn issues as easily.
    Here's one of the links I posted. I think it is similar to what you're asking.

    5DMkII Sensor Burnt Due to Shooting Into Sun - FM Forums

  17. #57
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Guys, guys.

    If you are so worried about the sensor burning, everytime you point your camera in the direction of the sun, just cap it.

    If you are not, just shoot.

    I know I care more about having good light, doesn't matter whether the sun is in the picture or not. I do have sentimental feelings for my camera but at the end of the day it is the photographs that matter more than anything else.

    Loads of people have shot into the sun since long time ago, you don't hear much about people complaining that their film caught fire, today you don't see many people reporting on sensor burn. Yes there are incidents but looking at the greater picture I'd say it's fair to conclude that the occurence is low and consequently the risk is low as well.

    Cheers!

  18. #58
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    Camera, not sensor.
    Which part do you expect to overheat in the above mentioned scenario? Are will still talking about reality and this universe?

    Quote Originally Posted by kklee View Post
    Light includes visible light and the invisible, infrared and UV.
    Sunny16 applies to the visible spectrum.
    Usually is the invisible spectrum that causes the damages.
    UV is not known to heat up cameras, it's well blocked by most lenses and the massive amount of UV protectors on most lenses. IR is blocked by the IR filter in front of the sensor. Ask the guys in IR subforum how much IR still passes through and how long they need to expose to get their results if the IR filter is still there.
    Let's get back to photography, this esoteric talk leads nowhere.
    EOS

  19. #59

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by NoS77 View Post
    I was wondering if using a longer focal length (like supertelephoto) to fill up the entire frame with only the sun will cause the sensor the burn up. (although this doesn't make sense composition wise, but just for discussion sake)

    It's akin to using a magnifying glass and concentrating all the energy on 1 spot. A simple magnifying glass can cause dry leaves to start burning in seconds, so would our lens do something similar? Especially longer lens.

    As for exposure time and amount, mirrorless cameras have their sensors exposed to light all the time. Thus I think the time for proper exposure would not be relevant for mirrorless cameras. DSLRs have the light reflected away when not exposing, so they should not encounter sensor burn issues as easily.
    Shot into the sun with a 300mm before though.




    You can't even look into the viewfinder unless you want to get blind. So had to use live-view to compose the shot, the lens steps down to get the proper exposure for live-view. Actual exposure was ISO100 1/8000th f/16, just to get an idea. So the amount of light that actually reaches the sensor isn't that much as what your eyes perceive.

    To keep the discussion going, aren't CMOS/CCD sensors inherently more reflective than film?

  20. #60

    Default Re: Sensor burn due to long exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine View Post
    Which part do you expect to overheat in the above mentioned scenario? Are will still talking about reality and this universe?


    UV is not known to heat up cameras, it's well blocked by most lenses and the massive amount of UV protectors on most lenses. IR is blocked by the IR filter in front of the sensor. Ask the guys in IR subforum how much IR still passes through and how long they need to expose to get their results if the IR filter is still there.
    Let's get back to photography, this esoteric talk leads nowhere.
    I was talking about camera, and I believe, for yourself, about sensors?
    Perhaps I should not have responded to you at the beginning when you quoted me.
    I see no point and is too much effort to reply to you when you question about whether is it still about reality and in this universe.

    P.S.
    I continue to believe that when I shine a UV torchlight through a lens onto a $2 bill that the UV security features still shows up and that a plastic like safety goggles blocks more UV than a B+W filter.
    and
    I continue to believe that it is possible for the scenario in the camera's user guide. for the very FACT that it is possible to start a fire using a magnifying glass.

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