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Thread: need some advice here.. taking indoor photos

  1. #1
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    Talking need some advice here.. taking indoor photos

    hi, i'm taking photos for a event indoors, at nite. The room/hall is well lighted wif low ceiling.. so thinking of using a bounce card....
    wanna ask. what ISO of film is best? I tot 400 might be abit grainy, wat abt 200?
    Another question is.. how to capture those happy moments? more focus on facial expression or action happening around?....
    My cam is minolta 3xi, old but stil able to snap well wif 35-70 n 70-300...

  2. #2

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    If the ceiling is low, you may not even need a bounce card, depending on the lightling. But u could use for the portraints. For film, I guess ISO400 would be adequate.

    For this kind of event coverage, try to shoot a variety images, both wide angle and portraits. So that at the end of the day, you have a series of photos that tell a story. As to how to go about catching those special moments, you just need to be very observant and be really quick to react to it. Perhaps more likely to anticipate the moments to come.

  3. #3

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    no need bounce card, just bounce off the ceiling

  4. #4

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    ISO 400 film will be grainy meh ? Don't think so right? If your camera is set at ISO 400, it won't be grainy , only when you pump it up to 1600 or something, has nothing to do with the film imho

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhythm_traveller
    ISO 400 film will be grainy meh ? Don't think so right? If your camera is set at ISO 400, it won't be grainy , only when you pump it up to 1600 or something, has nothing to do with the film imho
    ??

    Are you confusing digital ISO with film ISO? ISO 400 film is definitely grainier than ISO 100 film, and you don't usually set ISO on a film cam.

    nickpower, if you aren't printing too large (>8R), I think ISO 400 is ok.

  6. #6

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    thanks dkw

    pls correct me if i'm wrong

    my film body comes with iso settings.

    i use iso 400 film, and setting it at iso 400 and i don't find it grainy at all. but when i pump my film cam up to 800 iso or so, the pictures turn out to be grainy. same thing like when i use iso 400 on my body on a iso 200 film.

    what i meant is that using film iso 400 won't be showing much grain provided that you pumped it up. of cos comparing film 400 to film 200 iso, there definitely be grains but not that significant at all if you set iso 200 on the body for a iso 400 film

  7. #7
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    oh gosh... i'm confused... i didn know film bodies can set iso?
    if my understanding is correct, i believe for film bodies, the iso is dependant on the film u are using...?

    hope i'm not too wrong... gosh...

  8. #8

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    You can set ISO on a film cam. It just means whether you are exposing the film at the recommended EI or allowing it to be over/underexposed if you set it to any other value.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowspeeder
    If the ceiling is low, you may not even need a bounce card, depending on the lightling. But u could use for the portraints. For film, I guess ISO400 would be adequate.

    For this kind of event coverage, try to shoot a variety images, both wide angle and portraits. So that at the end of the day, you have a series of photos that tell a story. As to how to go about catching those special moments, you just need to be very observant and be really quick to react to it. Perhaps more likely to anticipate the moments to come.
    hey thanx. i think i'll use card.. get abit of flash forward to light up the subject....

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zerstorer
    You can set ISO on a film cam. It just means whether you are exposing the film at the recommended EI or allowing it to be over/underexposed if you set it to any other value.
    ohoh, i see... my bad...
    prob my old film cam too lousy le...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhythm_traveller
    thanks dkw

    pls correct me if i'm wrong

    my film body comes with iso settings.

    i use iso 400 film, and setting it at iso 400 and i don't find it grainy at all. but when i pump my film cam up to 800 iso or so, the pictures turn out to be grainy. same thing like when i use iso 400 on my body on a iso 200 film.

    what i meant is that using film iso 400 won't be showing much grain provided that you pumped it up. of cos comparing film 400 to film 200 iso, there definitely be grains but not that significant at all if you set iso 200 on the body for a iso 400 film
    RT,
    most film SLRs (well at least relatively modern ones) will automatically read the film speed off the casing. On some cams you can certainly over-ride the automatic ISO setting. BUT, the grain of the film is definitely a function of its speed (or vice versa, actually), as you are probably well aware. So ISO 400 is more grainy than ISO 200, due to pigment size (for lack of a better word). If you underexpose, by setting ISO 800 when using ISO 400 film, and then push in development, it will *probably exaggerate the grain problem*. The part between the asterixes* are my understanding, which may be wrong 'coz I've never done it myself and in any case my experience with film photography is limited. However, if the do the reverse (ISO 200 on cam for ISO 400 film), all else being equal, you are overexposing. Whilst this does not worsen grain, it will hardly improve it. So, it is not a matter of what setting you have on the camera but rather the native film speed (and therefore pigment size) and the amount of over/underexposure that will determine the graininess of your final print. The film SLR does not behave like a DSLR in this respect.

    OK, just my 2 cents from very limited film shooting experience. If I've made a factual error I'm happy for anybody to correct me. Thanks.
    Last edited by dkw; 9th April 2005 at 02:46 PM.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkw
    RT,
    most film SLRs (well at least relatively modern ones) will automatically read the film speed off the casing. On some cams you can certainly over-ride the automatic ISO setting. BUT, the grain of the film is definitely a function of its speed (or vice versa, actually), as you are probably well aware. So ISO 400 is more grainy than ISO 200, due to pigment size (for lack of a better word). If you underexpose, by setting ISO 800 when using ISO 400 film, and then push in development, it will *probably exaggerate the grain problem*. The part between the asterixes* are my understanding, which may be wrong 'coz I've never done it myself and in any case my experience with film photography is limited. However, if the do the reverse (ISO 200 on cam for ISO 400 film), all else being equal, you are overexposing. Whilst this does not worsen grain, it will hardly improve it. So, it is not a matter of what setting you have on the camera but rather the native film speed (and therefore pigment size) and the amount of over/underexposure that will determine the graininess of your final print. The film SLR does not behave like a DSLR in this respect.

    OK, just my 2 cents from very limited film shooting experience. If I've made a factual error I'm happy for anybody to correct me. Thanks.

    Well explained I get a rough idea now

    Thanks man!

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