View Poll Results: Think before shooting or after shooting?

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  • Think first before shooting

    16 72.73%
  • Shoot first then think later

    5 22.73%
  • Explain why you have shot the picture later

    1 4.55%
  • Tell each other why the picture is good or sucks and explain why

    0 0%
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Think before shooting or after shooting?

  1. #1
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    Default Think before shooting or after shooting?

    Do you photographers shoot first
    and think later and then
    you tell each other what is great and what is not,
    but often you will avoid the challenge of
    explaining why.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Believe me. "Shoot then Think" never works. And that's not just in photography.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default

    Originally posted by ckiang
    Believe me. "Shoot then Think" never works. And that's not just in photography.

    Regards
    CK
    Yup, "post rationalisation" don't work for me.

  4. #4

    Default

    neither, it is :

    Feel, Then shoot

    Think about wat? Think about wat aperture or shutter to use? Think about wat filter to use?think about wat lens to use?

    Well, a good picture is a picture with "feeling".

  5. #5
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default

    Originally posted by ninelives
    neither, it is :

    Feel, Then shoot

    Think about wat? Think about wat aperture or shutter to use? Think about wat filter to use?think about wat lens to use?

    Well, a good picture is a picture with "feeling".
    Hmmm...interesting.

    Why do you think "feel" doesn't constitute to "think"? As in thinking of how to react to the scene/subject. Thinking of how to document it. Definitely think of the technicalities that will best bring out the "feel" you have about the subject. Yes, to me, aperture, shutter speed, filters, lenses and emotional feelings are all components of an image.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Kit's Avatar
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    Default

    Maybe the solution is a hybrid one...........feel, think, then shoot.

  7. #7

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    Just keep on thinking! Never stop doing that in photography! Whether is before you shoot, when you are shooting, after you have shot, or after collecting your prints! Although time may not permit and you may not get the "moment" again but you got to make a decision fast and keep on thinking how you can improve on the shot, a different angle, lens, perspective... One way to improve is to evaluate your photos critically (i know is difficult) and think of how it can be improve or shot differently. If it's good, why is it good? Keep experimenting, that's the fun part of photography! It may sound easy, but i'm still thinking how to improve on my photography, looks like i have a long way to go... Just my 2 cents worth!

  8. #8
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    Default

    i use The Force when i shoot... and if that doesn't work i listen to gut feeling (since i got big gut).

  9. #9

    Default

    Same theory as what you would do in the toilet when taking a piss. Do you aim before you shoot or you shoot before you aimed?

  10. #10
    ClubSNAP Idol Adam Goi's Avatar
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    Default

    Maybe you can also start another poll...how long do you think before you press the shutter...1 minute, 1 second, 1 nanosecond?

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by AdamGoi
    Maybe you can also start another poll...how long do you think before you press the shutter...1 minute, 1 second, 1 nanosecond?

    3 hrs...

  12. #12
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    Default

    This is very exciting indeed, a show of hands for Clubsnap
    members who want to engage in virtual reality.


    Am I a thinking photographer?

    It is alright to be expressive and passionate about your subject.
    However the learning photographer (including myself) should be
    encouraged to always acquire a sense of curioisty and to promote
    further research into whatever he is doing.

    After the shoot you either see the finished print or view the images on your monitor.
    What are the impressions of your experience?

    What you saw, heard, smell and felt at that moment when you capture the image?

    The learning photographer like myself is always trying hard to be
    at the point of getting more familiarity and understanding of the
    equipment used.

    Next is to shoot a familiar subject in a hundred
    different ways and engaged my mind so that the subject
    is not the centre of my reality.

    I would change position and move around.
    I would carry a different lens on a different day (instead
    of just lugging my die heart favourite zoom lens in all my
    field trips).

    Words for the always thinking photographer:

    Reality
    Stimulating
    Habit
    Demanding
    Effective
    Remote
    Explanation
    Discussion
    Cracks
    Ego
    Unique
    Translate
    Freedom
    Mindset
    Encouraged
    Contribute
    Imagine
    Transparent
    Analysing
    Seeing
    Reading
    Processing
    Plan Well
    Mirror


    Questions:

    1. How does we relate the word "creativity"
    to a thinking "cameraman" or a mere shutter
    release button pusher?

    2. Would you agree a thinking photographer
    will excel in the long run shooting the same
    number of images in a given period of
    time?


  13. #13

    Default

    I've missed a lot of good shots because I thought too long before pressing the shutter. Once the shot is gone, it's gone forever. You can always do your thinking later with post-processing, cropping, etc.

  14. #14

    Default

    i think you have to 'feel' or a better word for it when you want to do spontaneous shooting and think while been absored by the process and think when you want to do plan shots. I think and feel differently and react for different situations.

  15. #15

    Default

    Personally, I like Xpose's toilet theory. To be very philosophical, the general rule of thumb in Photography ( I did not say that), the most important is the composure of the SUBJECT. Anything else, it's secondary. You can have the best camera, be it film base Nikon F8(it does not exit yet), 20Megapixel DSLR camera and the BEST Nikon lens(Ok, if Canon has the best lens), with Artificial Intelligent (No brain requires, I call it idiot proof, only good for idoit ) to give you the best setting, whitebalance, dof, shuttle speed, macro,micro focus whatever you want and the photographer does not know what subject to shoot. How ??? So, the subject is still the most important factor to capture the right subject, at the right moment in time. If you got that, and the image comes out lousy, it's not your fault, it's the equipment fault. Upgrade the equipment to get better image quality. So, my theory, to get ok shot, 2 approach, depending which category you fall in.

    1. Lousy equipment + Good Photographer = good shot
    2 Good equipment + lousy photographer = ok image quality

  16. #16
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    Default

    Originally posted by yllow

    1. Lousy equipment + Good Photographer = good shot
    2 Good equipment + lousy photographer = ok image quality
    well, then everyone will starting buying those cheapo kits lens. no one will buy canon L lens, nikon ef-d len, minolta g lens.

    equipments play a part too.........

  17. #17

    Default

    IMHO, photographers have to think all the time.

    They have to think before shooting. Subject, composition, good lighting, exposure, focal length, etc etc etc.

    Then they have to think after shooting. In the past, that used to be darkroom techniques, e.g. developing, printing (a la Ansel Adams), toning, burning, dodging, lith, bas relief, mounting, cropping, framing, (now some of it is done in photoshop).

    You just can't run away from both.

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