Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 44 of 44

Thread: Nikon D600 blown-out skies

  1. #41

    Default Re: Nikon D600 blown-out skies

    It is always the equipment's fault, even though it is the latest model. After all, the user already paid so much money, how could it still be the user's fault. The customer is always right. Thus the camera exposed to the right.

    In the words of Bryan Peterson; "You keep shooting!"
    WTB Manfrotto RC4 L Bracket

  2. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    River Valley
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by holyxiaoxin View Post
    So, in this photo, do you suggest me using a CPL,ND or soft GND filter? :/

    Expecting: bluer skies, less "reflection" on buildings, more defined looking clouds, and a "not so harsh" sky.
    A graduated ND filter will block some of the light from the sky and balance it with the light from the buildings/ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by holyxiaoxin View Post
    Or do you think that i just should just reduce my EV to 1/3-2/3 stop?

    Does changing EV affect the data in the RAW files? Or, I could add/reduce exposure in lightroom during post-processing, which would give me the same result if I do it before taking the shot. But if, in this case, tweaking EV before a shot is useless right, since it could be done during post-processing?
    The problem is that the dynamic range of the scene is greater than that of thec camera sensor. To get the exposure right, you need to cut down on the light from the sky.

    Changing EV does affect the RAW file. If you decrease the exposure to get details in the sky, you will lose details on the ground in shadow.

    You can do a lot to tone down overblown highlights (like your sky) and bring out details lost in underexposed areas (raw files contain a lot of detailed data that allows you to fix problems, that's why we love raw!), but those tweaks are only within certain limits and you will never make it look as good as a properly exposed photo. (Highlight will have less detail, shadows more noise even after you adjust in Photoshop.)

    One solution, as you mentioned is graduated ND filters. This photo is eight between an haed-edge and soft-edge.

    Another solution is to take multiple images and use HDR to pull together the beat exposed areas of each images.

    But those won't fix the biggest problem: midday landscapes suck. The light is just too vertical. Better to shoot near sunset ot just after sunset in the blue hour. Look in the land/cityscape section and see how those guys do it. It's amazing!

    Scintt has excellent shots and he often tells what his setup is. That will help you.
    Last edited by jfxberns; 5th March 2013 at 01:54 PM.

  3. #43

    Default

    you are yet to learn to walk, but you already want to run.... after trying filters and not getting the shot you want then next thing is filters are not good...

  4. #44
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    River Valley
    Posts
    272

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MilanTristan View Post
    you are yet to learn to walk, but you already want to run.... after trying filters and not getting the shot you want then next thing is filters are not good...
    How is this helpful advice?

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •