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Thread: esplanade

  1. #1

    Default esplanade

    Hi Guys,

    I'm a newbie. Here's a picture that have taken recently. Appreciate any comments. Hope to improve with your views.



    I also have a problem when allowing my camera to adjust the shutter speed while in Aperture priority mode. Sometimes, the picture turns out to be darker than what I want, but other times, turns out ok. Will it be due to the ISO speed and/or the metering modes? How will I know when to use what settings?

    Thanks in advance for your comments!
    Last edited by Kei; 23rd March 2005 at 10:58 AM.

  2. #2
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    Sorry can't view your photo..

    If u have difficulty setting your Av and Tv, try increase your ISO

  3. #3

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    sorry, mistake in pasting the image... here it is...




  4. #4

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    If your point of interest is the flower, maybe you must find other angle so that the flower can be isolated from its surrounding. The back ground seems too dominant. The message brought by the picture is not clear enough.

    Joko.

  5. #5
    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
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    From a camera idiot's (me) point of view, the faded flower doesn't compliment the architecture. I like to take flowers in front too. Hmm sky blown out the spikes angle looks funny.
    Use auto mode safer with TV or AV doesnt matter. dark--> u pointed @ bright area .

  6. #6
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    sometimes dark sometimes bright? you might be using spot metering. If you spot metered on a dark spot, you camera will try to brighten that spot thus brightening overall picture. Same vice-versa. Use centre-weighted or evaluative if you aren't familiar with spot metering.
    “How fortunate for leaders that men do not think.” - Adolf Hitler

  7. #7

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    Hi Guys,

    Thanks for all your comments! will continue to take more pics and pose them here for your views.

    Yanyewkay, I'm actually using either evaluative metering or centre-weighted metering (my camera does not have spot metering.)

    Correct me if I'm wrong, does it mean that:
    ISO increase = brighter picture (given all other factors are the same)
    Evaluative metering = automatic neutral exposure at the focus point, therefore if the picture is a mix of dark shadows and bright sunlight, i must focus on something with in-between brightness to achieve the best effect?

    Thanks!

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    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
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    Or just play with ur EV.

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    Quote Originally Posted by expositer
    ISO increase = brighter picture (given all other factors are the same)
    yes.

    Evaluative metering = automatic neutral exposure at the focus point, therefore if the picture is a mix of dark shadows and bright sunlight, i must focus on something with in-between brightness to achieve the best effect?
    "Evaluative metering" is a very generic term (it could be applied to any metering method), so it would depend on the specific camera. In my limited experience with a Canon DSLR, evaluative metering is pretty much a lottery game. I find integral/center-weighted metering much more predictable and consistent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by expositer
    Hi Guys,

    I'm a newbie. Here's a picture that have taken recently. Appreciate any comments. Hope to improve with your views.
    Don't know what you are taking (subject)? The flower or the esplande? Photo gave me a feeling that you are at two minds, "undecisive of what you wanna take, so you take alittle bit here and there".

    Also the color is abit flat.

  11. #11
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    its most probably due to your metering modes...
    esp when u take something against a bright background, such as the one in your pic. =)

  12. #12
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    Why no blue sky? Seems a little over-exposed. Anyway, you did include the shooting spec nor the equipment used. Need thst to help more.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by expositer
    Hi Guys,

    I'm a newbie. Here's a picture that have taken recently. Appreciate any comments. Hope to improve with your views.


    I also have a problem when allowing my camera to adjust the shutter speed while in Aperture priority mode. Sometimes, the picture turns out to be darker than what I want, but other times, turns out ok. Will it be due to the ISO speed and/or the metering modes? How will I know when to use what settings?

    Thanks in advance for your comments!
    Backlighting. Meter fooled by the background brightness.

    The best equipment will be your eyes to see and to judge.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by tommon
    Why no blue sky? Seems a little over-exposed. Anyway, you did include the shooting spec nor the equipment used. Need thst to help more.
    Overexposed? It seems like a bit underexposed to me. Maybe my eyes are playing tricks on me.

    No Blue sky? Conservative estimation ...... it is a cloudy day with overcast.....

  15. #15

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    Hi Guys, thanks again.

    Sorry for not giving the information about the picture that I took. They are as follows:

    Camera: Canon EOS 350D
    Mode: Aperture Priority
    ISO: 400
    Aperture: f/5.6
    Shutter Speed: 1/500 sec
    Focal Length: 55mm
    Metering: Partial

    Blurblock, you are right it was a slightly overcast sky (weather wasn't so good that day)

    Thanks!
    Last edited by expositer; 26th March 2005 at 06:15 PM.

  16. #16
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    probably what many others mentioned...
    ur metering was fooled by the bright sky, try to go nearer to ur subject, take a partial metering (rem e exposure), go back to where u want to shoot, compose and use manual choose the previous exposure and shoot... =)

    sounds damm troublesome... lolx, cos 350D (if I not wrong, dun have spot metering), this is kinda of a safer way to get e correct exposure..

  17. #17
    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
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    I wouldn't use ur settings if I were u. You've a powerful cam there, but the settings..... you know..

  18. #18

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    Hi Dennisc,

    What settings would you have used then, based on your experience? Thanks for sharing.


  19. #19
    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
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    Iso 400 on a bright day tends to destroy pics, don't u think? Unless ur capturing F1 j/k. For me I'd like it iso 100 or lower, and steer through some difficult lighting, esp nightshots and jungle/indoor shots. Challenging!
    In broad daylight iso 100 or < should be just nice. Well I don't know much, but you can give it a try.
    Last edited by dennisc; 29th March 2005 at 05:48 PM.

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