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Thread: What lens to use?

  1. #1

    Default What lens to use?

    Advice to seek from full-timers.
    What are the lenses you would advice to get if one is going into photography as a full time career?
    Let's say for instances coverage of weddings, DnDs or events?
    Bearing in mind of course a limited budget.

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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AReality
    18-200mm
    Any brand.
    Thanks for the reply !!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Zeckson Chow's Avatar
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    Hello,

    How much does that 18mm - 200mm lens costs? I am an amateur but seriously into photography. Learning since I got my Nikon D70. Low budget too.

    Since I am also asking, may as well...

    As I am a newbie, I will go into general photography and try to be The Jack of All Trades first. During this phase,

    1. Does the 18mm - 200mm lens still stand?
    2. Can this lens do Macro Photography?
    3. Is an external flash a must too?

    Sigma has a standard zoom lens from 28mm - 200mm but it also has a telephoto zoom lens of 70mm - 200mm. What is the difference?

    Shall we start off with a lens first or a flash? If lens, what would you recommend?
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    I'm not sure if a 18-200mm lens exist
    But I'm sure that 1 lens can't do all the job required. First of all, you have to realise what kind of photography job you will be taking on. You will also have to know your style of shooting. Not everyone looks at things the same way, and hence your approach might be different from the rest. I suggest you look read up about the different types of lens, either here on Clubsnap or on internet.

    Zeckson, one of the best lens to start with should be something around the range of the kit lens, about 18-70mm if possible. This is the general type of range that most shots will use (except for birds and sports). An external flash really helps a lot for indoor shots, but you can also make do without one for the time being if its a really tight budget. Of coz you should start with a lens first!!! You can still take pics without a flash, but you can't without a lens!

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    Senior Member icarus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by de_stan
    Advice to seek from full-timers.
    What are the lenses you would advice to get if one is going into photography as a full time career?
    Let's say for instances coverage of weddings, DnDs or events?
    Bearing in mind of course a limited budget.
    Which system are you using??
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    Quote Originally Posted by de_stan
    Advice to seek from full-timers.
    What are the lenses you would advice to get if one is going into photography as a full time career?
    Let's say for instances coverage of weddings, DnDs or events?
    Bearing in mind of course a limited budget.
    For your needs, your lens choice may be towards wider side.

    Wide enough to shot around each table (may not be able to move backwards due to space constraint).

    As for happenings like on stage where close-up is needed, if you're the official photographer, then you'll be 'eligible' to move up close. Hence tele end of the lens may not be required.

    Just some guesses from another newbie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeckson Chow
    [FONT=Arial]Hello,

    As I am a newbie, I will go into general photography and try to be The Jack of All Trades first. During this phase,

    1. Does the 18mm - 200mm lens still stand?
    2. Can this lens do Macro Photography?
    3. Is an external flash a must too?

    Sigma has a standard zoom lens from 28mm - 200mm but it also has a telephoto zoom lens of 70mm - 200mm. What is the difference?

    [FONT]
    1. You can try out with this 18-200 first, and later if you're into more specialist area, this is still a good range for travel/walkaround. But lens with this range, if I'm not wrong is not available on market yet (ie. Tamron).

    2. Can a lens do Macro/micro depends on the minimum focus distance. Of cos there are accessories (like close-up filter, extension tube) to allow focusing nearer with a non-macro lens.

    3. If you shoot mostly indoor, then you'll can't live without an ext flash. There are of cos many other outdoor applications.

    From another newbie

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    Quote Originally Posted by de_stan
    Thanks for the reply !!
    Greetings,
    I think it is misleading to have put it so simplistically. You need to go into this with both eyes wide-open, the pro-photog field is cut-throat right now and there are more than a few established pros trying to switch out of that career. It will take you much more than an SLR body and one lens to do the job. Much more than equipment, the fact that you have posted such a question really shows you have yet to begin to understand the technical side.

    Apologies for being a little terse, would hate for you to take a plunge prematurely based on faulty advice.

    OTOH, you could easily start off with an 18-200 lens and take pictures for a hobby first, and then see if you really have an aptitude or interest for the job.

    Cheers,

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    Quote Originally Posted by de_stan
    Advice to seek from full-timers.
    What are the lenses you would advice to get if one is going into photography as a full time career?
    Let's say for instances coverage of weddings, DnDs or events?
    Bearing in mind of course a limited budget.
    From my own usage, i'd say a range of 20-85mm Full frame.
    if you want to factor in crop factor then maybe from 15-85mm

    It is better to get at least 2 lenses to cover this range.
    What system are you using?

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkw
    Greetings,
    I think it is misleading to have put it so simplistically. You need to go into this with both eyes wide-open, the pro-photog field is cut-throat right now and there are more than a few established pros trying to switch out of that career. It will take you much more than an SLR body and one lens to do the job. Much more than equipment, the fact that you have posted such a question really shows you have yet to begin to understand the technical side.

    Apologies for being a little terse, would hate for you to take a plunge prematurely based on faulty advice.

    OTOH, you could easily start off with an 18-200 lens and take pictures for a hobby first, and then see if you really have an aptitude or interest for the job.

    Cheers,
    dkw is right, its no walk in the park. its very very competitive with photographers (or any moron with a new dslr passing himself off as a 'pro' photographer) everywhere undercutting each other. be prepared to be paid as a "camera man", not a "photographer".

    i can almost gurantee your passion will die in no time. how strong is your resolve and how much do u believe in yourself? be honest with yourself. do you have a bona fide business plan? where are your clients from, how will you reach them? will they pay as much as you think you should be paid?

    i'm not discouraging you but remember that once you plunge into it, it becomes a business. and not everyphotographer is a businessman. dont think you can rely on your talent, singapore is not ready for that. many others have come and gone, the landscape is littered with many others before you.....

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    Firstly to answer de_stan's initial question.

    Lens choice and equipment choice, while important for a professional photographer is NOWHERE NEAR AS IMPORTANT as being a very competent photographer. To this end I'd suggest you stop worrying about what kit you have and start learning to take killer shots using what you have and with minimal post shooting processing! This means getting the basics right, spend your money not on fancy lenses and other toys, but on books, education (courses) and other developmental aids to help you become a better photographer.

    Once you can take quality images then and only then can you really consider a career in professional photogaphy. Take a position as a paid or unpaid PA to a professional for a while (how long depends on your abilities) before trying your hand as a professional lensman.

    Budget wise you'll need to spend between 20-30,000 dollars per format on professional kit. Most professionals run at least 2 different formats, for example, 35mm and a 120 format system. Some of us even run 3 or more formats. If you are planning on going digital in 120 Format add an extra 30,000 SGD to the above, while large format digital systems can run in to hundreds of thousands of dollars per system.

    Ian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian
    Firstly to answer de_stan's initial question.

    Lens choice and equipment choice, while important for a professional photographer is NOWHERE NEAR AS IMPORTANT as being a very competent photographer. To this end I'd suggest you stop worrying about what kit you have and start learning to take killer shots using what you have and with minimal post shooting processing!
    I fully agree with Ian.

    If you are buying an entry level camera (like the D70 or 350D), it usually comes with a kit lense. Some of these kit lense are very good in quality (like the 18-80mm kit lense from the D70). Start with that lense. It is also useful to have flash for event (if you are really on very tight budget, you can make do with the in-camera flash but it will be limited in power). Once you have improved on your skills and know what you want, you then talk about getting more lenses. It also depends on personal preference. For example, I like to use prime lenses (but not exclusively) most of the time.

  14. #14

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    thats like asking the question what shoes is good to wear ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by de_stan
    Advice to seek from full-timers.
    What are the lenses you would advice to get if one is going into photography as a full time career?
    Let's say for instances coverage of weddings, DnDs or events?
    Bearing in mind of course a limited budget.

    Lets say you go learn from real fulltimers first as an assistant then you will know what to use. After that learn to take good to great photos. Talk is easy here, I wonder how serious you are into full time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theITguy
    Lets say you go learn from real fulltimers first as an assistant then you will know what to use. After that learn to take good to great photos. Talk is easy here, I wonder how serious you are into full time.

    I hate to burst your bubble, but most professionals I know won't won't take on a rank amateur as a PA. My minimum requirements for an applicant who wishes to PA with me is 5 years SLR experience in a variety of styles, plus a portfolio and then they have to sit a practical test to ensure they aren't trying it on.
    The Ang Moh from Hell
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