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Thread: Any filter for B&W

  1. #1

    Default Any filter for B&W

    Hi , i am interested to learn B&W ...

    R there any filter that can convert image to B&W from a DSLR ?


    thanks

  2. #2
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    hmm.... ... ...

    Photoshop solves everything.

  3. #3
    Senior Member icarus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitkat
    Hi , i am interested to learn B&W ...

    R there any filter that can convert image to B&W from a DSLR ?


    thanks
    Dude! a quick way will be to press the "Desatuate" button in PS...
    Yngwie J. Malmsteen - "...I've never considered myself a fast guitar player..."

  4. #4

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    no such filter (to my knowledge) but i hear yellow filter makes B&W look better. you can try at ur own risk.
    But Btw anyone can tell me y?

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    If you are shooting digital, just shoot in Colour RGB and convert it in Photoshop or similar software. Do not shoot in B&W as you will lose information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Climber
    no such filter (to my knowledge) but i hear yellow filter makes B&W look better. you can try at ur own risk.
    But Btw anyone can tell me y?
    I think the original poster was referring to numerical filters for digital photos.

    Regarding your question, the spectral sensitivity curves of the human eye and panchromatic b/w film are quite different. The human eye has its maximum sensitivity in the green range, whereas b/w material is more sensitive to blue. Green or yellow filters can correct for this to some extent.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by theITguy
    If you are shooting digital, just shoot in Colour RGB and convert it in Photoshop or similar software. Do not shoot in B&W as you will lose information.

    Sadly ... have not found a photoshop B&W filter plug in close to film B&W

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    I think the original poster was referring to numerical filters for digital photos.

    Regarding your question, the spectral sensitivity curves of the human eye and panchromatic b/w film are quite different. The human eye has its maximum sensitivity in the green range, whereas b/w material is more sensitive to blue. Green or yellow filters can correct for this to some extent.

    hmm if it is for landscape building B&W , shld it be towards green filter ? thnks

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitkat
    Sadly ... have not found a photoshop B&W filter plug in close to film B&W
    DSLR - it won't help you to achieve film-like BW even with filter.

    You need to use PS to tweak it - try channel mixer in PS it yeild better BW result.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitkat
    Sadly ... have not found a photoshop B&W filter plug in close to film B&W
    if you're so hot for film b&w, might as well shoot the real thing.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitkat
    hmm if it is for landscape building B&W , shld it be towards green filter ? thnks
    Filtering is largely a matter of taste, so you have to find out what you like. I think orange or even red filters used to be popular for landscapes as they can result in quite dramatic sky. Apart from how different colours are rendered, going towards the red end of the spectrum also reduces the effects of atmospheric scattering (haze). Then again, in some landscape photos one may want to emphasize the haze and even use a blue filter. There is no clear cut "right" and "wrong".

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleWolf
    I think the original poster was referring to numerical filters for digital photos.

    Regarding your question, the spectral sensitivity curves of the human eye and panchromatic b/w film are quite different. The human eye has its maximum sensitivity in the green range, whereas b/w material is more sensitive to blue. Green or yellow filters can correct for this to some extent.
    Thanks little wolf ! really helpful info there thanks .

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