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Thread: Iso

  1. #1

    Smile Iso

    Need help on this clarification:

    On a flim camera, If I used a 200 film and change the ISO manually to say either ISO50 or ISO 400...what will happen???

  2. #2
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Iso

    Originally posted by Paladin
    Need help on this clarification:

    On a flim camera, If I used a 200 film and change the ISO manually to say either ISO50 or ISO 400...what will happen???
    The metering will be wrong, and if you use P mode or Auto mode, the exposure will come out incorrect. ISO200 is 2 stops more sensitive then ISO50 and 1 stop less sensitive then ISO400. You can manually compensate though, so say using the ISO200 and you set it to ISO50 for example, if the meter says 1/125s f5.6, you can set 2 stops down to 1/125s f11, then the exposure would be correct... but why do you wanna do such "ma fan" thing? Need some mental exercises?

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    Default

    Hi. I too don't understand why people like to "Push/Pull" ISO? Can someone with more knowledge enrich me? Thanks.

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    Originally posted by serendipity
    Hi. I too don't understand why people like to "Push/Pull" ISO? Can someone with more knowledge enrich me? Thanks.
    Most people push, and less people pull. The process in simple terms means shooting at a particular ISO, then varying development time to achieve another ISO.

    Imagine you are asked to shoot say, a concert. All you have is ISO 400 film. But you are not getting good shutter speeds and you really want ISO 800 film. So what you do is to set your camera to ISO 800. Metering will be based on ISO 800 and you are able to shoot in dim light situations.

    Now, after you finish, you go to the lab then tell them to "push 1 stop". This means they will develop the film as if it's an ISO 800 film. The side effect is that you will get more grain and contrast.

    Conversely, if you shot ISO400 film at ISO 100, you tell the lab to "pull 2 stops" and they will develop accordingly.

    Regards
    CK

  5. #5

    Default

    FYI , you need to pay extra $$$ for push/pull developing ...
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

  6. #6
    Moderator ziploc's Avatar
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    So des neh...

  7. #7

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    geez....i didn't know this sorta stuff was possible.... ....learnt something new!!!

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    Originally posted by Goose
    geez....i didn't know this sorta stuff was possible.... ....learnt something new!!!
    Don't we always learn something new every day?

    Regards
    CK

  9. #9

    Default

    Originally posted by megaweb
    FYI , you need to pay extra $$$ for push/pull developing ...
    Is it expensive???

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by Paladin


    Is it expensive???
    50% more in the film processing. So if regular processing is $4, pushing will cost you $6.

    Regards
    CK

  11. #11
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    Hi

    just to let everyone know, this process can be achieved with digital photography also.

    Suppose you're shooting a low light event where flash is forbidden, and your maximum ISO on your digital camera is ISO 800. The camera is suggesting very low shutter speeds at ISO 800 at the biggest aperture u have (say f2.8), and u can't handhold that shot.

    wat do u do?

    you can switch to manual mode or use the exposure compensation dial to dial down one stop for shutter speed to the more handholdable shutter speed. Now naturally since you dial down a stop of shutter speeds, ur images are obviously going to be underexposed by 1 stop (asssuming in camera meter reading is accurate). Just keep on shooting.

    When you get back home, run Photoshop, adjust curves for the first image until the image looks correct. Save the curve you just did, and then use Automate->Batch in photoshop, create an action that will apply this curve consistently across all images from that low light event shoot. If you do it right, that curve will consistently bring up all images by 1 stop. You have now effectively increased your camera's ISO at one stop to 1600. You've pushed your digital film by 1 stop.

    Sometimes, depending on camera, it may be better to push low ISO to high ISO in photoshop using levels than actually shooting at the high ISO due to high level of digital noise. You will have to experiment to see which one is moer suitable for u.

    The last paragraph may seem strange, until you realise that for films, it's the same. For example it has been reported that it is better to push Fuji Press 800 film to 1600, than shoot with Fuji's 1600 film - images turn out better.
    David Teo
    View my work and blog at http://www.5stonesphoto.com/blog

  12. #12

    Default

    Originally posted by Red Dawn
    The last paragraph may seem strange, until you realise that for films, it's the same. For example it has been reported that it is better to push Fuji Press 800 film to 1600, than shoot with Fuji's 1600 film - images turn out better.
    I do agree with the noise / grains....I always thought shooting at low light must need high ISO film..even at ISO400, the kodak film still turns out very grainy.....

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    Originally posted by Paladin


    I do agree with the noise / grains....I always thought shooting at low light must need high ISO film..even at ISO400, the kodak film still turns out very grainy.....
    Sell/give/throw away all your Kodak, especially Kodak MAX 400. That must be one of the worst, most grainy 400 films around. With the money, buy Fuji Superia XTRA400. It costs only $7 for 2 rolls of 36 exposures at Cathay. Super fine grain.

    Regards
    CK

  14. #14

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    You tried Supra 400 or not before? Appears to be quite good too!

    And then there's Fuji Press 800. That's high speed film!

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    Originally posted by YSLee
    You tried Supra 400 or not before? Appears to be quite good too!

    And then there's Fuji Press 800. That's high speed film!
    My friend tried Portra 400VC, grainy compared to Fuji NPH 400 and Superia XTRA 400.

    Fuji Press 800 is a very impressive high speed film. Relatively low grain (for such a high speed film) and wide exposure latitude.

    Regards
    CK

  16. #16

    Default

    Not Porta, Supra.

  17. #17

    Default

    I will be talking my Co D&D..so should I stick to 200??? Recommendation pls

  18. #18

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    If you think you'll be shooting in low light conditions, just go buy a few rolls of Fuji Press 800.

  19. #19

    Default

    Originally posted by YSLee
    If you think you'll be shooting in low light conditions, just go buy a few rolls of Fuji Press 800.
    Was thinking maybe 400 enough?? In a hotel ballroom..should be sufficient right??

  20. #20
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    Originally posted by Paladin


    Was thinking maybe 400 enough?? In a hotel ballroom..should be sufficient right??
    better go ISO 800......u want to freeze pple dancing....and not have blur pictures....(of course pictures depicting movement is a different story...)

    Also, if u go ISO 800, EVEN if u use flash, you can retain more of the ambient light - i
    m sure in a hotel ballroom, they should have soft lights that create that special atmosphere....u dunwan to spoil that with your powerful flash! the flash can easily overcome ambient light unless your ambient exposure is near optimal, and for that, you will need that Press 800.
    David Teo
    View my work and blog at http://www.5stonesphoto.com/blog

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