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Thread: which dslr requires least post-processing?

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    Default which dslr requires least post-processing?

    hi, I've heard of a lot of people commenting that post-processing is a necessity for pictures taken by all dslr. however, due to poor knowledge in photoshop, would like to know which dslrs produce images that require least or no post-processing.

    thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by asturias105
    hi, I've heard of a lot of people commenting that post-processing is a necessity for pictures taken by all dslr. however, due to poor knowledge in photoshop, would like to know which dslrs produce images that require least or no post-processing.

    thanks!
    Most DSLRs allow you to set parameters so that you will not have to do much post-processing. For instance, for Canon, you can set sharpness, contrast, saturation levels from normal to high. I beleive other brands also have this feature but I do not know the specifics. This will give you decent, out of the camera pictures, but with less leeway for post-processing as detail is almost always lost, and you may get some artifacts.

    Cheers,

    PS: I suggest you learn up some post-processing software, it is really not difficult and actually quite fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by asturias105
    hi, I've heard of a lot of people commenting that post-processing is a necessity for pictures taken by all dslr. however, due to poor knowledge in photoshop, would like to know which dslrs produce images that require least or no post-processing.

    thanks!
    one suggestion.

    just send whatever you shot to the photo lab, and they'll do everything for you. you dun even have to know how to use photoshop.

    many of my female colleagues are doing that also, and their pics came out pretty well exposed...with their point and shoot digital cameras

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkw
    Most DSLRs allow you to set parameters so that you will not have to do much post-processing. For instance, for Canon, you can set sharpness, contrast, saturation levels from normal to high. I beleive other brands also have this feature but I do not know the specifics. This will give you decent, out of the camera pictures, but with less leeway for post-processing as detail is almost always lost, and you may get some artifacts.

    Cheers,

    PS: I suggest you learn up some post-processing software, it is really not difficult and actually quite fun.
    thanks, dkw. can you list out some of the areas which need to master in post-processing? i'm using photoshop cs.

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    Fujifilm S1/S2/S3 Pro images probably require the least amount of post-processing

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    Quote Originally Posted by rncw
    just send whatever you shot to the photo lab, and they'll do everything for you. you dun even have to know how to use photoshop.

    Since we're on this topic, anyone know what's the normal workflow of those developing labs?


    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by AReality
    Since we're on this topic, anyone know what's the normal workflow of those developing labs?
    .
    depends on the skills and professionalism of the shop. eg. my neighbourhood shop at yew tee mrt stn dun bother to do anything to my pics. wat u give they develop. heck... they even any how crop. so, if i dun crop b4hand, my subject's head will be missing... and... THEY CHARGE BLARDY EXPENSIVE for digital prints. handling charges, this charge dat charge...

    most of the time, my digital prints go to miao laan at bukit batok. the folks there actually help u to improve ur colour balance to ur pics, if its really out. but, they are sometimes off a bit. so, wat i do is to do all the adjustments at home and ask them to crop and print only. they only fine-tune if i'm really off. things they do are the usual - levels, curves, colour sat and USM (only if necessary).
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    Quote Originally Posted by asturias105
    hi, I've heard of a lot of people commenting that post-processing is a necessity for pictures taken by all dslr. however, due to poor knowledge in photoshop, would like to know which dslrs produce images that require least or no post-processing.

    thanks!
    In a way, that is quite easy to answer and harder to do. The DSLR that requires the least amount of post processing or none at all is the "person" using the camera. Not trying to be cheeky but that is the fact.

    I am an above average user of Photoshop and it is part of my ricebowl but even I have days I am sick and tired of post-processing all my shots. I rather take more time to delibrate at the shooting stage to try and not have to bother with post-processing. So, get to know your DSLR better...

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    Quote Originally Posted by rncw
    one suggestion.

    just send whatever you shot to the photo lab, and they'll do everything for you. you dun even have to know how to use photoshop.

    many of my female colleagues are doing that also, and their pics came out pretty well exposed...with their point and shoot digital cameras
    Only partially true. Exposure, contrast maybe, and not always to your taste.

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    Quote Originally Posted by asturias105
    thanks, dkw. can you list out some of the areas which need to master in post-processing? i'm using photoshop cs.
    Hah hah, Photoshop CS is the Rolls Royce of postprocessing software. Learn to use levels (for exposure), contrast, saturation adjustments, the crop tool, and sharpening for starters. Anybody else got something to add?

    Try looking into the digital darkroom subsection in this forum for more tips.

    Cheers,

  11. #11

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    i tink in time u have to learn to post process too....so might as well start learning...

    for colours wise i tink the fuji s2/3 pro prob the best...

    but nikon also can set custom curves to achieve good results.... if u know how to make ya own curve better yet....

    for labs they only adjust the red blue and yellow channel and brightness to get a good exp for u.... i dun tink they do much more than tt le .... so if ya photo is not sharp enuff also no point right...

    cheers..

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by asturias105
    hi, I've heard of a lot of people commenting that post-processing is a necessity for pictures taken by all dslr. however, due to poor knowledge in photoshop, would like to know which dslrs produce images that require least or no post-processing.

    thanks!
    I would think the DSLR belonging to the a photographer with better skills would require less post processing ....

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by darrelchia
    I would think the DSLR belonging to the a photographer with better skills would require less post processing ....
    Hmmm.... i dun think so leh. Those pro photographers most of time engaged pro DI artists to post process their pictures.
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    Actually, imaging consists of both pre and post poccessing. This is true both in old style film and the new digital imaging world. The followings are what I read about, although most I did not try doing as I am still a newbie

    Film Pre-Processing:
    1. Different Films for different Subject/Weather/Etc
    2. Filters like Soft/Grad/ND/CP/Colour/Colour Conversion

    Film Post=Processing:
    1. Burning and Dodging


    Actually, digital imaging is pretty similar to film imaging. Just that certain stuff are done before while the others are done after. But certain stuff like use of Grad ND, ND, CP are never truely replacable IMO using digital means, although there are some claims to do that. But a Blown out sky is a blown out sky, you cannot use digital imaging means to get back the original sky.

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    if your cam can use custom curve then it helps to cut down a lot of processing of brightness/contrast and the tones and colour balance

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    Quote Originally Posted by reflecx
    Fujifilm S1/S2/S3 Pro images probably require the least amount of post-processing
    Agree I have used these cameras Nikon D1x, D70, D100, Canon D60, 10D, 20D, 1D, 1D mkII, 1DS, 1DS mkII, Fuji S1 pro, S2 pro, and S3 pro. Fuji give me the closest colours.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by singscott
    Agree I have used these cameras Nikon D1x, D70, D100, Canon D60, 10D, 20D, 1D, 1D mkII, 1DS, 1DS mkII, Fuji S1 pro, S2 pro, and S3 pro. Fuji give me the closest colours.
    Sigh...If only Fuji will combine their nice sensors with CAM-1300 at least, better fps (maybe 5) and increased shot buffer and perhaps i-TTL support.
    Hmm that will be a nice combi.

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    at Yesterday's launch of the D2X they claim that their matrix meter has been updated to require little or no Post processing and it does come with 5fps and 8fps*
    * conditions apply

    But you still need to know your camera.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ortega
    at Yesterday's launch of the D2X they claim that their matrix meter has been updated to require little or no Post processing and it does come with 5fps and 8fps*
    * conditions apply

    But you still need to know your camera.
    Oh well, sometimes its not just the metering, its the issue of whether the SENSOR which captures the light and determines the color and the bits and bytes of JPEG compression techniques of the image processor that determines the end-results

    Its partly the "brain", the Image processor, and the layout of the tiny photo-detectors on the CCD. (Hexagonal for Fuji) as well as the range of colors the photo detectors can capture.
    The image processor also helps to "clean up" noise (noise reduction) and sharpening images (anti-aliasing..etc)

    Which is why some die-hards still perfer FILM over digital.

    THe diff is the "capturing device" CCD over chemicals on a Film, not the metering.


    But Beyond the bits and bytes of the NEF, JPEG...the "NEED for POST PROCESSING" is hard to define, since a pic may look fine to one, but to another photographer it may need more processing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nightwolf75
    depends on the skills and professionalism of the shop. eg. my neighbourhood shop at yew tee mrt stn dun bother to do anything to my pics.
    IMHO, that is very professional. The last thing I'd want a lab to do is to "correct" the gradation, colours, etc. that I carefully adjusted in the computer. The ability to have someone else print the pictures while keeping control over image adjustments is one of the main advantages of digital photography.

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