Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 60

Thread: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

  1. #1

    Default My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    I am starting this thread so I could expand and add my amatuer tips to share on Toy Photography (largely 54mm in height) as I go along time to time.

    The Product Shots will continue be posted in My Try @ Product Photography - Toys and Collectables


    NOTICE: If you see this image in some of the older posts means I had used up the 10GB bandwidth for this month. I'm sorry these pictures can no longer be viewed until next month where the counter will be reset to zero and the pictures would then appear again. Enjoy !



    Here it goes...

    Part 1 - Decide What You Want to Shoot (see thread below)
    Part 2 - The Camera and Accessories
    Part 3 - The Lightings and Support
    Part 4 - Behind the Scenes
    Optional Gadgets
    TIPS - Focus Stacking
    TIPS - Using Close Up Filters - How they Come Handy in Close-Up Shoots
    TIPS - Image Stacking
    TIPS - Color Space Which to Use ? Adobe1988 or sRGB?
    TIPS - Calibrating Your Computer Monitor
    TIPS - Using Reflectors
    TIPS - Get a SECOND Hygrometer !
    TIPS - Light Sources - Understanding the Fundamentals
    TIPS - Shoot at Lens Optimum Apertures !
    TIPS - White Balance in Product Photography - Get it Always Uniform
    TIPS - Post-Processing Anime Figures
    TIPS - No Monitor Calibration Tool - Use this Manual Tuning Steps, It May Just Work !
    TIPS - Photoshop Layering - Combining Layers to Get the Final Picture
    TIPS - Windows 7 Color Management Interfering with the Calibration Software After the Computer Recovers from Sleep or Hibernate Mode
    TIPS - How to Determine the Total Number of Shutter Count on Your Camera Using Photoshop
    TIPS - Shooting Top-Down - Top View (Part 1)
    TIPS - Does the PHILIPS BULBS Flicker?
    TIPS - NIKON DG-2 EyePiece Magnifier - Does it Work ?
    TIPS - How to Focus Miniatures WITHOUT Using the NIKON DG-2
    TIPS - Shooting Top-Down - Top View (Part 2)
    TIPS - A Simpler Way to Shooting Top View of Toy Models
    TIPS - The Lightings - Switching to LED Light Bulbs
    TIPS - Post Processing Metallic Painted Model Cars



    Shooting Small Toys Tips - Behind the Scenes



    Here is how I did it...

    BTW I am no expert in this field - the tips provided here are for home enthusiast who like to produce the shoots/images pictured in this thread



    Part 1 - Decide What You Want to Shoot



    - Decision 1 - Continuous Lighting or High-Key. If shooting Hi-Key you'll need a Speedlite and a soft-box



    continued on next post....
    Last edited by DM101; 23rd February 2017 at 11:38 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    - Decision 2 - Type of images - Actual Product Represenatation or Wide-Angle
    Every type of lens is built for its purposes. If you require a "exact" shoot of the product, a MACRO lens is required. I had tried to use the NIKON 16-85mm DX @ 85mm but find it "distorts" the product







    The NIKON 16-85mm DX I shoot only @16mm to produce more interesting wide-angle shoots of the product





    Part 2 - The Camera and Accessories

    I use the NIKON D5100 for now. For Hi-Key shots I used the PHOTTIX wireless trigger to fire the Speedlite (these don't need line of sight).



    Also used the NIKON cabled trigger for a more sharper shot. The NIKON infra-red tigger also works as well if you have one (but it drains the battery of the camera much faster)

    Settings used are:
    1. Lens VR turn off and use MANUAL focusing
    2. Use a cable release and lock the mirror (in NIKON this is call exposure delay which will minimise vibration of the camera to give you the sharpest image)
    3. Aperature I use f16 and shutter speed 1/30 (you can try yourself which one gives you best exposure)
    4. White Balance set to FLASH
    5. Shoot in RAW format
    6. Color space is Adobe RGB
    Last edited by DM101; 3rd February 2014 at 03:42 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Part 3 - The Lightings and Support

    I used low-cost IKEA lamps. These are sufficient for Figures but for armored tanks (30cm in length) is not enough. ALL lamps used are COOL DAYLIGHT from PHILIPS - stick to ONE brand only for consistency in the lights color temperature



    Just bought this lamp (17cm shade) and experimenting for the tanks shooting - yet been tested though




    UPDATE: As of JUNE 2016 I had switched from using Fluorescent Light to LED Light for my shooting setup.






    Also used 2 LEDs lamps CN-160. These can be bought over ebay and are not expensive compared if buying in SINGAPORE camera shops!



    VERY VERY IMPORTANT - use a good tripod for the camera. The free tripod usually bundled with the camera are LOUSY - you can actually see the differences - if your image is not sharp all things doesn't matter any more



    Last edited by DM101; 3rd September 2016 at 10:45 AM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Part 4 - Behind the Scenes

    This is how the lightings are setup from the top view.



    Just move the lamps nearer/further from the figures to get the lightings you require.



    To prevent flare from the flash in Hi-Key shots, I also used two small boxes to block it (DIY using velvet black coth glued to it) See the differences....



    Noticed the unprocessed image is already "95% there" - just some sharpening and you will have your final image.



    This is how the final image looks like after Post Processing in Photoshop (resize, sharpening and levels adjust - that's all)



    Experiment and Enjoy !
    Last edited by DM101; 30th October 2012 at 10:17 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Optional Gadgets

    I also tried the SPYDER cube to help me get a more accurate color temperature adjustment in Post-Processing. Actually one could also trial and error (if your PC monitor had already been color calibrated) - the cube not very necessary though



    Also used the SEKONIC light meter to determine the Exposure settings I should set manually on the Camera. Again one could also trial and error - the meter is not very necessary likewise


    To ensure my image color is WISIWIS (what I see is what I shoot) in Post-Processing, I used the "X-Rite Eye 1 Display 2" to calibrate my Monitor. This X-Rite model had been retired - replaced by a newer model.

    For me this is an IMPORTANT accessory so I don't waste time tuning my images on a non-calibarted monitor - I get the colors of the product what I intended to show spot on when the images are viewd from PC, Mac to iPhone and IPad



    The Eye-Fi is a good gadget to have - you can upload wireless the JPG file on an iPAD or PC to review instantly - the RAW filw still is in the camera SD card which could be uploaded to the PC later. NIKON D5100 supports this wireless LAN card.

    However you will find this card drains the camera battery much faster......

  6. #6

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    This is how one can use the SPDYER Cube in action. This gadget is not neccessary... I don't use it at all now in my shoots



    Using Photoshop levels I adjust until the SPYDER cube bottom BLACK hole is visble, the calibrated final image is below



    Comparing the two images, you can see the cube is just a good to have thing only (for my Toy Photography - it may have better use by the professionals photographers)
    Last edited by DM101; 30th October 2012 at 09:54 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member G-man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    My House
    Posts
    2,105

    Default

    Thank you for taking the time and effort to share this with us!

  8. #8
    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    10,916
    Blog Entries
    26

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Thanks for the effort !
    shaddap and just shoot .... up close
    Walkeast

  9. #9

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    TIPS - Focus Stacking

    When shooting miniatures as a product we hit what we called DEPTH OF FIELD limitation. From the diagram below the 4 variables 1 to 4 means only 5 cm of the region are sharped and focused - anything outside will be blur which is no good for a product shoot



    We can use the tecnique call FOCU STACKING. Take multiple shots at different focus points and then combine them in Post-Processing. For example:


    Last edited by DM101; 2nd November 2012 at 08:35 AM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Then you "ADD" them together in Photoshop using PhotoMerge function to give you the final all the way sharped image





    The final image can be found in my thread here
    Last edited by DM101; 2nd November 2012 at 07:34 AM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Tampines
    Posts
    2,456

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Certainly a very good tutorial in 'Miniature Photography' thanks for sharing
    5D/5D3/Zeiss/28-85/100 F2/200 F4/50 F1.4/70-200/24-85/85 F1.4
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/zeisser/

  12. #12

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    TIPS - Using Close Up Filters - How they Come Handy in Close-Up Shoots

    Every lens has a limitation what we know as "Minimum Focus Distance" - the closest you can get to the subject for the lens to be able to focus



    In wide angle shooting - in this example 16mm on a DX lens, because of this limitation more of the background is captured rather than the product. I want to capture more of the product so I can have greater flexibility to crop, re-size the image in Post Processing later (more pixels is definitely better than less)



    A solution is to use Close-Up Filters to attach to the lens so your camera to reduce this "Minimum Focus Distance" . The filters could be bought quite cheaply from eBAY



    See you can get more of this tank just with a +2 filter attached ...

    Last edited by DM101; 8th November 2012 at 06:54 PM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Also filters can be stacked up - the recommendation is the STRONGEST Filter to be mounted CLOSEST to the lens in below order



    However getting TOO CLOSE is not useful if your lighting is obstructed though

    Here's the final image. As you can see if without using Close Up Filter the product captured image/pixel would be too small and I could not not get this kind of resolution and close up details below




    Thank you for enjoying this thread...

    Quote Originally Posted by G-man View Post
    Thank you for taking the time and effort to share this with us!
    Quote Originally Posted by ed9119 View Post
    Thanks for the effort !
    Quote Originally Posted by Zeisser View Post
    Certainly a very good tutorial in 'Miniature Photography' thanks for sharing
    Last edited by DM101; 8th November 2012 at 08:39 PM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Very nice write up!

    Nice miniatures btw, you painted them yourself?
    Its a rare hobby now with video games and such....

  15. #15
    Deregistered
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    CCK
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    nice guide, helps a lot

  16. #16

    Default

    Fantastic write up!

  17. #17

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    No, I don't have such skill - all these are pre-painted by craftsmen. My skill level is at most paint chip touch-up 1mm to 2 mm in size still can do

    Quote Originally Posted by pinholecam View Post
    Very nice write up!

    Nice miniatures btw, you painted them yourself?
    Its a rare hobby now with video games and such....

    Quote Originally Posted by SOGTGH View Post
    nice guide, helps a lot

    Quote Originally Posted by mogwai View Post
    Fantastic write up!
    Thanks for the encouragement - just sharng my amateur photography experiences....

  18. #18

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    TIPS - Image Stacking

    I find shooting shiny metal surfaces are the most difficult as they are reflective. Sometimes you can achieve what you desire in one shot like the metal blade sword below but not every object is that easy



    For those I can't achieve in one-shot, I use Image Stacking - concept is quite similar to Focus Stacking

    For example the Samurai Helmet below, DOF is OK but the metal blade Head Gear is at a 45 degrees - so to bring out the reflective characteristic of the metal blade Head Gear in 1 shot is near impossible



    SOLUTION - Do it in 2 shots !

    STEP 1 - FIRST SHOT - get overall product image



    Last edited by DM101; 14th November 2012 at 10:57 PM.

  19. #19

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    STEP 2 -Get the Reflective Head Gear Shot next










  20. #20

    Default Re: My Tips @n Toy and Collectables Photography

    Next page - TIPS ON COLOR SPACE Adobe1988 or sRGB.....

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •