Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: wat filter?

  1. #1

    Default wat filter?

    wat filter to use under fluorescent light?

  2. #2
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by llh9761
    wat filter to use under fluorescent light?
    Hi there...

    Well it depends on whether you are talking film based SLRs or Digital SLRs.

    With digital SLRS like Nikon 70, they have a digital filter built-into the camera which you can select via the white balance setting.

    For traditional film based SLRs, there is no special anit-fluorescent film you can buy that will off-set the flourescent effects.

    The general filter would be the FL-D filter. This is the universal model code for this filter regardless of whatever brand you buy in the market. It is basically a pinkish looking colour filter that will off-set the greenish tint of the florescent light for general daylight film. But there are also two others type available too.

    They are FL-W which is for warm white or white flourescent light fixtures and FL-B which is rare as you use this only when you shoot tungsten film under flourescent lighting condition. Tungsten film, in case you are not aware is film that you normally would use when shooting in warm lighting like those yellow filament bulbs. You need to use tungsten film so that you can "cool" down the warm yellow/orangy tone that will effect the picture. So this type of FL-B filter for flourescent is rare as this type of film is also rarely used.(more costly too)

    I use to have the FL-D filters but rarely use it as, creatively speaking, sometime I find the greenish effect of the flourescent can be use to good effect especially when it is a scene that has also other forms of lighting (bulb, halogen, evening sunset or various type of fluorescentlighting fixtures) intermixing to give a very interest look to a picture.

    Another reason why it is seldom used or at least by me when I was still shooting SLRs was that, this FL-D is not 100% effective. It never claim to be too...no matter what brand you buy. For one thing, lighting comes in varying temperature...same goes for fluorescent too, they have varying temperature too depending on brand and types...etc. In order to truly maximise the effective use of such a filter you would need to get a colour temperature meter to measure how much of a difference it is and then order some more specific fluorescent filter with the right counter tint to rectify greenish cast.

    These days with a digital camera, you can basically take out the fluorescent cast by selecting the anti-fluorescent mode (fine tune it with the - & + setting) but just like with SLRs, it is still not 100% fool proof but at least you can still download the picture to your PC's photoshop and reworking the colour cast further.

    That's my two bits lah...hope it does answer your question in part.
    Last edited by sammy888; 21st February 2005 at 03:42 PM.

  3. #3
    Moderator ortega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    23,686
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default

    that is more than 2 bits, wah walking encyclopedia.
    I agree with you.

  4. #4
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ortega
    that is more than 2 bits, wah walking encyclopedia.
    I agree with you.

    hehe..well...maybe just a tad more. I have to confess I was pretty much a "filter mania" in my younger "dazes" When you don't have that much money to buy more lens and more expensives ones especially, you tend to go the next best thing...buy filters to play play heheh... I have all those star burst, multi prism image type, graduated colour or neutral..etc. In short, alot of filters I recalled always going down to DSO ( anyone remember that uncle's photo shop at Peninsula) to find more of those funny filters he sells along with the B+W of course.


    With digital, it is so much easier now...phew!
    Last edited by sammy888; 21st February 2005 at 10:53 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member GENO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Teddy Bear Land
    Posts
    2,981

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888
    hehe..well...maybe just a tad more. I have to confess I was pretty much a "filter mania" in my younger "dazes" When you don't have that much money to buy more lens and more expensives ones especially, you tend to go the next best thing...buy filters to play play heheh... I have all those star burst, multi prism image type, graduated colour or neutral..etc. In short, alot of filters I recalled always going down to DSO ( anyone remember that uncle's photo shop at Peninsula) to find more of those funny filters he sells along with the B+W of course.


    With digital, it is so much easier now...phew!
    nelson u mean right?...me also filter crazy! haha
    Take both its legs down first, then cuts its tail, next is shoot between its eyes:devil:

  6. #6

    Default

    ideal perfect flourescent filter dont exist.

  7. #7
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GENO
    nelson u mean right?...me also filter crazy! haha
    The old uncle ya...lost track already lah so long ago. I know he is related to the folks over at the Camera Workshop.

    Well good to see another filter crazy person here. But me more a retired one lah hahah....these days I only have my odd UV, polarisers and some others ones I know are somewhere in my room since they were so low branded and so weird by today's standard that I can't get anyone to buy them hahahaah....


    Those were the days man. So many photogpraph and even those movies of the day...alway using all those rainbow star bursts, softar filters, diffusers, glow..etc. and of course there is those corkin ones too...

    Anyway, I rarely managed to get my FL-D flourescent filter to fully be perfectly right for most of my shots. This is where, digital really has it over manual SLRs.

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks for your detail answer sammy888, im using a film slr at the moment, cos dun 1 2 use my slr flash on my brother's new born baby. So do i use the FL-D filter to offset the greenish tint of the florescent light in hospital room if i use fuji neopan black n white film?
    Last edited by llh9761; 22nd February 2005 at 04:17 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    1,568

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by llh9761
    Thanks for your detail answer sammy888, im using a film slr at the moment, cos dun 1 2 use my slr flash on my brother's new born baby. So do i use the FL-D filter to offset the greenish tint of the florescent light in hospital room if i use fuji neopan black n white film?
    Hi..

    I have not shot black and white film for sometime but I am certain it would not effect anything in terms of fluorescent lighting. You should be able to shot without having the FL-D filter on your lens since colour shifting problem from fluorescent light source is no longer an issue. Far as I can recall, fluorescent does not pose an issue with black and white film.

    If you are really concern and willing to go the distance to purchase a FL-D filter just to take picture of the baby, I say do a test run at the hospital then buy that filter. Don't need to have the bady there....just shoot the hospital room/ward with your bw film and process it to see.

    But really...you don't need the FL-D filter with black and white lah. That filter is designed to work on colour film.

    In fact From what I read sometime back we have even colour negative like those of Fuji Superia has even some additional quality that help eliminate the fluorescent effect without using a filter even.
    Last edited by sammy888; 23rd February 2005 at 03:35 AM.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,095

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by llh9761
    wat filter to use under fluorescent light?
    First and foremost, a notch filter that blocks the 546.1 nm spectral line from the mercury vapor discharge (this is what causes the green tint). Unless you're shooting slides, that will probably be sufficient.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888
    Hi..

    I have not shot black and white film for sometime but I am certain it would not effect anything in terms of fluorescent lighting. You should be able to shot without having the FL-D filter on your lens since colour shifting problem from fluorescent light source is no longer an issue. Far as I can recall, fluorescent does not pose an issue with black and white film.

    If you are really concern and willing to go the distance to purchase a FL-D filter just to take picture of the baby, I say do a test run at the hospital then buy that filter. Don't need to have the bady there....just shoot the hospital room/ward with your bw film and process it to see.

    But really...you don't need the FL-D filter with black and white lah. That filter is designed to work on colour film.

    In fact From what I read sometime back we have even colour negative like those of Fuji Superia has even some additional quality that help eliminate the fluorescent effect without using a filter even.
    Thanks for the info

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •