View Poll Results: How much data do you burn in a CD-R?

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    27 41.54%
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Thread: How much data do you burn in a CD-R?

  1. #1
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    Question How much data do you burn in a CD-R?

    How much data do you burn in a CD-R?

    For myself, i will squeeze all data until the very last Megabyte
    We are HDD of PC & FT are MB add to storage;
    so PC never hangs with enormous storage capacity - LKY

  2. #2

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    i try to squeeze but usually its per project or theme, which rans from 250-400 mb

  3. #3
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    I try to squeeze the full 100%. But sometimes, I still burn when it's less than 100% full, for sending to labs, giving to friends, temporary backup, transportation etc.

    Regards
    CK

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  5. #5
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    use CD-RW for stuff like backup, send to lab etc, this will help to save your CD-Rs

    sometimes it is a good idea to leave some space for "expansion" e.g. including photos from other people who also covered the same event.



  6. #6

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    if possible burn til close to 100%.....

    if not use multi sessions , next time fill it up lor...

    not becoz i "giam" or what ,just trying to reduce the number of CDRs in my room......

  7. #7

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    Yup, use multi-session to optimize the capacity. Can have as many session as you want. However, with the cost of the CDR been so cheap, why even bother to count the MB. With 1GB MicroDrive now use in most DSLR and prosumer class DC, you will be worrying how to split the data into 2 CDR, maybe 500MB each. If saving all your precious photoshot in the CDR, I definately do not suggest buying those stack of no-brand CDR in 50s or 100s per stack. Very Cheap but highly unreliable and unstable in long term storage. Make good coaster thou.

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by yllow
    Yup, use multi-session to optimize the capacity. Can have as many session as you want. However, with the cost of the CDR been so cheap, why even bother to count the MB. With 1GB MicroDrive now use in most DSLR and prosumer class DC, you will be worrying how to split the data into 2 CDR, maybe 500MB each. If saving all your precious photoshot in the CDR, I definately do not suggest buying those stack of no-brand CDR in 50s or 100s per stack. Very Cheap but highly unreliable and unstable in long term storage. Make good coaster thou.
    If I didn't remember wrongly, every session created eats 30MB of extra space for lead in/lead out. But then, like you said, CD-Rs are now so cheap..... cheaper than 3.5" floppies.

    Regards
    CK

  9. #9
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    come'on...

    VOTE VOTE VOTE
    We are HDD of PC & FT are MB add to storage;
    so PC never hangs with enormous storage capacity - LKY

  10. #10

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    Originally posted by yllow
    If saving all your precious photoshot in the CDR, I definately do not suggest buying those stack of no-brand CDR in 50s or 100s per stack. Very Cheap but highly unreliable and unstable in long term storage. Make good coaster thou.
    I dont agree with you on this point. Throught the years, i have used many brands of CDR from time to time, started from branded like sony and all the way to those 100 per stack CDR. From pratical experiences, its not the price of the CDR, its the dye that the CDR media use that is the most important. Below, i try to summeries some of the more important factor in buy CDR media, Branded or not.

    Dye Factor
    --------------

    - Blue (2yrs + shelf life, older drive and CD players might have problem reading it, very cheap, $0.30/CD)
    - Blue Silver (extended life, +3 ~ 4yrs more than true blue, enhanted compatibility , rather cheap $0.35/CD)
    - Green Silver (excellent mix, long shelf life 10yrs or longer, excellent compatibility with old CD drives, affordable, good price ratio, $0.40-$0.45/CD)
    - Silver/diamond (very long shelf life of 20yrs or longer, hardly have any CD drive that has any problem reading the contents, typical $0.50 - $0.60/CD)
    - Pure any color except Silver will have almost the same properties as Blue dye, except bright golden dye which enhants the compability with older sets.

    * Compatibility test was conducted on Audio CD players.

    Other factor to consider is the top coating of the CD.
    The thicker the surface coat (the side which allows you to write on) the better. This layer decides the reflectivity of the Laser from the media to the optical lens of the optical drive.

    Some CDR media offers anti slip/scratch bottom surface (the side which the Data is written on). The better the coating of this surface, the better, as it prevent scratches to the actual dye surface and allow the use of milder cleaning agent to be used for cleaning of the surface. This layer also acts as a shield against moisture and fungai which are responsible for the degrading of the storage life (shelf life) of CDR media as well.

    Tips:

    Locally made CDR media, is usually found in bulk of 100. Standard for locally made CDR media is always grade A, most of them is usually based on the Green Silver Dye. Cost per CD is usually $0.40/CD, comes in varity of surface coating, but most of them have a layer of anti-scratch surface coating.

  11. #11

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    I dont usually burn to full capacity as the outer rim is usually more pron to scratches than the inner ones as it spins inside the CDR, due to gravity and off centre movement and CDR being made of plastic have some level of warping. However, given today technological advancement, most high speed drive (32x and above) have some form of anti-shock and stablilty system to keep the media spin properly. But its always good to play safe, practically, its safe to burn up to 95% of the CD max capacity.

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by misato

    Dye Factor
    --------------

    - Blue (2yrs + shelf life, older drive and CD players might have problem reading it, very cheap, $0.30/CD)
    - Blue Silver (extended life, +3 ~ 4yrs more than true blue, enhanted compatibility , rather cheap $0.35/CD)
    - Green Silver (excellent mix, long shelf life 10yrs or longer, excellent compatibility with old CD drives, affordable, good price ratio, $0.40-$0.45/CD)
    - Silver/diamond (very long shelf life of 20yrs or longer, hardly have any CD drive that has any problem reading the contents, typical $0.50 - $0.60/CD)
    - Pure any color except Silver will have almost the same properties as Blue dye, except bright golden dye which enhants the compability with older sets.
    wow....are u working in CD-R industry?

    now CD-writers are so fast...even 48X CD-writers are now flooded into sim lim. One surly need high speed CD-R in order to write at 48x.....however, i found that actually many 16x or 32x CD-R can burn at 48x without problem

    so how CD-R are actually rated?? does higher speed CD-R more durable and better quality???

    some pple also believe that the slower u burn your CD...the better it is. Do u all agree? or is it the writing method that will affect the CD? eg. CLV, P-CAV, Z-CLV, CAV....etc
    We are HDD of PC & FT are MB add to storage;
    so PC never hangs with enormous storage capacity - LKY

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by misato
    But its always good to play safe, practically, its safe to burn up to 95% of the CD max capacity.
    since there are pple who dun burn up to max capacity. probably u can get this Yamaha CRW-F1 which allows u to burn graphic/text on unused portion of the CD

    it looks something like this

    We are HDD of PC & FT are MB add to storage;
    so PC never hangs with enormous storage capacity - LKY

  14. #14

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    No i dont work in that industries, but i have burned for clients and for personal back up, with a grand total of around 2000+ CDs burned to date. Not that i want to actually burn so much doh.

    I have tried all the colors, and bought quite a few batches (100's) of different brand / color CDR. Toasted a few CDR as well.

    Higher burn speed CDR is achived by using dye which is more sensitive to the heat generated by the laser, so reaction time is shorter, thus achiving faster speed. But this will also mean that the "burnt mark" make by faster speed laser is weaker as well, thus, certain drives might have problem reading the data record. Current technology is rather mature, but for compability usage, 24x is safe enough a speed to use and should not have much problem when the media is read from another CD drive.

    The issue with high speed burning isnt too obvious with Data CD, but when it comes to Audio, the differences can be rather wide open. For Audio application, the faster the burn speed, the higher the noise level of the audio when played back from the disc. For low end system such as VCD player and Discman, one can burn up to 10x without any noticable lost in quality to the untrain ear. But when one play back on a $10k sub system, the noise resulting from burning at high speed can be clearly heard. Thus yamaha Audio Mastering system was set to work at 4x.

    On the new tatoo'ing system introduced by yamaha, it uses all the unused space to creates the images on the CD. So bigger the image, the less usable space you can have for you data/audio

  15. #15
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    Originally posted by misato
    The issue with high speed burning isnt too obvious with Data CD, but when it comes to Audio, the differences can be rather wide open. For Audio application, the faster the burn speed, the higher the noise level of the audio when played back from the disc. For low end system such as VCD player and Discman, one can burn up to 10x without any noticable lost in quality to the untrain ear. But when one play back on a $10k sub system, the noise resulting from burning at high speed can be clearly heard. Thus yamaha Audio Mastering system was set to work at 4x.
    actually hor...this Audio Master thingy dun work very well. in our review here, in fact it produce the worst result when tested in semi-professional Hi-Fi system by an audiophile. whereas burning audio CD at 44x is the best

    i dunno why is that so also...i am not an audiophile so i cannot tell the different

    btw, if i really want to burn something in the CD that last really long, will getting 48x CD-R media and burn at 1x helps?
    We are HDD of PC & FT are MB add to storage;
    so PC never hangs with enormous storage capacity - LKY

  16. #16

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    the answer is no. getting the high speed CDR but burning at lower speed does not help in terms of durablilty.

  17. #17

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    wow, misato, maybe you want to write an acticle on CDR/CDR/W and dvd?


    DVD is gold colour, why?

  18. #18

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    Misato, Quite an in-sight on CDR. Leant a little bit more today about dye. The problem is, most of use can't really tell the different color dye one from the other. A couple more comments to add.

    1. It's not true writting at low speed, like 1X give better reliability. This is true in the early days when the CD Writer speed is only 1X speed. Since than, most available CDR media is rated at least 16X. In fact, if you write slower than 4X on a CDR media rated at 16X or above, it will cause more damage. When writing at slower speed, the laser burnt longer at the spot, thus bigger spot because the spin speed is low. Not a good idea. I recommend burning at 4X and above.

    2. Just to clarify in a CDR disk, the data actually is store on the top side, not the bottom side. The silkscreen printed on the top side is truely a protective coating for the data. The top layer coating is not use for reflective purposes. You can easily buy a blank CDR disk with NO TOP COATING. When writing on the top coating, be very careful. Do not use a ball-point pen or sharp pointer to write. Use a marker instead. You run the risk damaging the data if you scratch the top coating deep enough to cause permanent damage. The bottom layer where the layer pickup the data has a layer of transparent coating to ease the laser pickup. If you don't believe, overturn the CDR disk with the coating layer facing down and rub it on the floor. Damaging the coating layer and scratch deep enough will permanently damage the disk.

    3. Writing speed has nothing to do with audio quality playback. Most probably, the problem arise during the ripping of the audio-track from the Audio CD Track and store into the wav file. Older CDROM Drive and CDRW writer when extracting the audio track have some quality lost during the ripping. a 1 percentage lost might not shown up alot in normal player, but high-end audio equipment will definately amplify these defect.

  19. #19

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    Any recommended shops where we can get Silver/Diamond CD-Rs at $0.50 per CD?

    Intending to get some.

  20. #20

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    Originally posted by yllow
    Misato, Quite an in-sight on CDR. Leant a little bit more today about dye. The problem is, most of use can't really tell the different color dye one from the other. A couple more comments to add.

    Can someone care to describe how to tell the different colour dye from the other?

    Maybe misato or yllow could help here.


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