Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: How do I flatten colours in film?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    L2TPYSG
    Posts
    4,057

    Default How do I flatten colours in film?

    Besides scanning + photoshop...
    is there anyway to adjust the brightness range other than the linear pushing? I think using polarisers also have a limit right? esp on the skies... and fill-flash only covers close objects...

    erm to get what I mean I wanna do something like curves in Photoshop... but I wanna get it from the camera... can I add NDs until I do a slow shutter in broad daylight? will this give me the same exposure ratio to shooting it at 1/250?

    thx..
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    6,405

    Default Re: How do I flatten colours in film?

    Originally posted by denizenx
    Besides scanning + photoshop...
    is there anyway to adjust the brightness range other than the linear pushing? I think using polarisers also have a limit right? esp on the skies... and fill-flash only covers close objects...

    erm to get what I mean I wanna do something like curves in Photoshop... but I wanna get it from the camera... can I add NDs until I do a slow shutter in broad daylight? will this give me the same exposure ratio to shooting it at 1/250?

    thx..
    Huh??

    Sorry, don't understand what you are trying to say.

    Regards
    CK

  3. #3
    Midnight
    Guests

    Default

    I think denizenx is referring to reducing the dynamic range of the scene so as to better fit the range of the film without minimal overexposure or underexposure.

    Have you tried a graduated neutral density (GND) filter?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    L2TPYSG
    Posts
    4,057

    Default

    but not shooting distinct areas leh... so GND are not too useful...
    so there's no way to compress the range huh? sigh... must get a scanner again...
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  5. #5
    Midnight
    Guests

    Default

    I don't think there's much else that can be done if there isn't any way to clearly demarcate the "brighter" and "darker" regions of the scene, short of adding your own lighting somehow. Even if you scan your negatives or prints in and manipulate them, the detail that couldn't be adequately captured within the film's dynamic range will not be available no matter what you do, though admittedly you can coax a lot more out of negatives than digital images.

  6. #6

    Default

    Could gel work??


  7. #7

    Default

    I think we must understand ultimately light is the most crucial factor in regards to the results of the picture. if there is insufficient light or too much light at a spot, you you normallly get slight over exposure or under exposure. In short (lack of details).
    We can push technology by using filters but there will still be limitation.

    I think there also huge different in black and white in contrast with colour films in regards to the latitude of the films. You can get a very long range of tones in b/w though strong understanding and carefully monitoring of the various films, exposure, and development process. As B/W deals only in grey tones, it is often unbiased in term of contrast. ( in 'fine' art printing like ansel adams.) Infact, negative have greater tone levels than that of the printing paper. Film like t-max have a very unbiase nature of tone values which also contribute to a rich level of details.

    In color photography however, there is an additional factor which makes it harder to achieve a constant latitute. If you for example take a thick strip of yellow coloured paper and put it beside a thin red coloured paper, at some point you would find the red overwhelming.

    One more factor that affect the latitute of the film is also none other than the nature of the medium. The physics structures of film is actually a curve 's' shape..(just like a graph) This due to chemical behavior of silver nitrate. At, different strengh of light, time of exposure silver ( a natural stubstance of the periodic table ) is very subjected to different results when reacted with the silver metal. Just like water, h20 actually expand after melting point. This sudden change after the 'constant' period is very natural.

    In general, this physically property of the film can never be fully controlled by use of science. We can only try to push the limitations by using physics. And the problem will also be there unless you use digital.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •