Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: When would fast shutter speed (like 1/4000s and faster) be useful?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    12,938

    Default When would fast shutter speed (like 1/4000s and faster) be useful?

    Are they just marketing gimmicks or do these have really useful applications? Just wondering.
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    L2TPYSG
    Posts
    4,058

    Default

    it's useful when u have a fast motor drive and not afraid of burning film... then u can try to photographs jumping frogs or raindrops or pan a long jump athlete with zoom...
    digitals well u can check out those ppl who shoot dripping taps and stuff...
    normally for us single-shots I think 1/1000 is just to allow bright sunlight w big apertures... otherwise dun think anyone can react so *fast*
    "I'm... dreaming... of a wide... angle~
    Just like the ones I used to know~"

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    12,938

    Default

    Actually, I have a 1/10000s setting for my camera.... haven't found a use for it yet. Maybe, I'll try taking pics of falling water droplets But I think it would probably result in underexposure....
    Check out my wildlife pics at www.instagram.com/conrad_nature

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Singapore, Singapore, Singapor
    Posts
    6,405

    Default

    It's very useful in bright daylight conditions and you are using fast film (ISO 400 and above) combined with large aperture (e.g. f/4 and larger)

    E.g.
    Going by the Sunny f/16 rule,
    if you are using ISO 400 film, at f/16, your shutter speed should be 1/500.
    if you want to use it at say, f/4, you will therefore need a shutter speed of 1/4000s.


    Regards
    CK

  5. #5
    Midnight
    Guests

    Default

    While you don't need such fast shutter speeds to freeze most types of subject motion, these shutter speeds are very useful for maintaining proper exposure while still keeping a large aperture in bright settings, which are quite frequently encountered around noontime here in Singapore. If you don't have these shutter speeds available (like my digicam), then you usually have to use a ND filter or else live with overexposure.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •