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Thread: why my photo is "foggy" (color wrong?)

  1. #1
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    Unhappy why my photo is "foggy" (color wrong?)

    here's the before and after pic of the cat. wondering if u all can deduce why foggy? I find that the color of the Original ... as if it is covered by a fog or veil.

    BEFORE


    After



    I did a Auto Adjustment, move sharpening to Medium, in Nikon PictureProject.


    Nikon D70
    2005/02/05 08:15:18.9
    JPEG (8-bit) Fine
    Image Size: Large (3008 x 2000)
    Lens: 24-85mm F/3.5-4.5 G
    Focal Length: 85mm
    Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
    Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
    1/400 sec - F/4.5
    Exposure Comp.: +0.3 EV
    Sensitivity: ISO 800
    Optimize Image: Custom
    White Balance: Direct sunlight -1
    AF Mode: AF-S
    Flash Sync Mode: Not Attached
    Color Mode: Mode Ia (sRGB)
    Tone Comp: Auto
    Hue Adjustment: 0
    Saturation: Enhanced
    Sharpening: Medium high
    Image Comment:
    Noise Reduction: OFF

  2. #2
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    by the way, i dunno how to process images, thus, i set Sharpening to Medium in my camera and then set Sharpening Level to medium again in Nikon Picture Project.

    What's the basic items i shld process for images? (brightness,contrast?)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    What's the basic items i shld process for images? (brightness,contrast?)
    If you find the pictures too dull, increase contrast or adjust levels/curves. But don't overdo it. The "after" picture looks way too contrasty to me, while the "before" picture appears quite natural.

    Also, a high contrast setting on the camera could lead to problems when shooting high contrast scenes (out in bright sunshine).

  4. #4
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    the BEFORE pic is without any processing (picture out of the camera)

    generally, photo out of SLR camera need to be procesed right?

  5. #5
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    foggy? looks like underexposed to me. or you have problem metering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    generally, photo out of SLR camera need to be procesed right?
    I would say it differently: the aggressive internal processing of many point&shoot cameras frequently "improves" pictures to the point where they are beyond repair (blowing out highlights, drowning out shadows, and saturating colors).

    DSLRs tend to be more careful with the image data. Pictures straight from the camera may look a bit more subdued - whether you consider them better or worse is a matter of taste. You don't have to postprocess them, but some finishing touches will in most cases help to make your photos look more polished.

    If you want, you can also go for the "point&shoot look". That is pretty much what the automatic improvements in your software seem to have done. The "after" picture looks more "crisp", but the fur of the white cat is almost blown out and looks quite unnatural to me. But that's admittedly a matter of taste.

    If you have photoshop or similar software, look at the histograms of the two pictures you posted. The "before" picture doesn't fill the entire range from black to white, so it looks a bit dull. In the "after" picture, the tonal range is expanded to a point where some highlights and shadows are partially chopped off. The optimum would be somewhere inbetween. In photoshop, you could use the "levels" tool to adjust the picture to your liking. The "fogged" DSLR picture gives you the freedom to choose, whereas point&shoots may simply throw away image information that cannot be recovered.

    Please don't take my distinction between "DSLR" and "point&shoot" too literally. I've had very good results with a point&shoot, and also had awful experiences with an early DSLR.

  7. #7
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    seems like a metering issue to me...

    bracket your shots since it's free. (no film required) heeheheehe...

    and try metering in different places, playing with different metering options, spot, matrix, etc...

  8. #8

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    You may have metered on the white cat before shooting? Thus, causing a little underexposure. As for the composition, you may want to adopt a lower angle, maybe towards the eye level of the 2 cats.


    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    here's the before and after pic of the cat. wondering if u all can deduce why foggy? I find that the color of the Original ... as if it is covered by a fog or veil.

    BEFORE


    After



    I did a Auto Adjustment, move sharpening to Medium, in Nikon PictureProject.


    Nikon D70
    2005/02/05 08:15:18.9
    JPEG (8-bit) Fine
    Image Size: Large (3008 x 2000)
    Lens: 24-85mm F/3.5-4.5 G
    Focal Length: 85mm
    Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
    Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
    1/400 sec - F/4.5
    Exposure Comp.: +0.3 EV
    Sensitivity: ISO 800
    Optimize Image: Custom
    White Balance: Direct sunlight -1
    AF Mode: AF-S
    Flash Sync Mode: Not Attached
    Color Mode: Mode Ia (sRGB)
    Tone Comp: Auto
    Hue Adjustment: 0
    Saturation: Enhanced
    Sharpening: Medium high
    Image Comment:
    Noise Reduction: OFF

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    here's the before and after pic of the cat. wondering if u all can deduce why foggy? I find that the color of the Original ... as if it is covered by a fog or veil.

    BEFORE


    After



    I did a Auto Adjustment, move sharpening to Medium, in Nikon PictureProject.


    Nikon D70
    2005/02/05 08:15:18.9
    JPEG (8-bit) Fine
    Image Size: Large (3008 x 2000)
    Lens: 24-85mm F/3.5-4.5 G
    Focal Length: 85mm
    Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
    Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern
    1/400 sec - F/4.5
    Exposure Comp.: +0.3 EV
    Sensitivity: ISO 800
    Optimize Image: Custom
    White Balance: Direct sunlight -1
    AF Mode: AF-S
    Flash Sync Mode: Not Attached
    Color Mode: Mode Ia (sRGB)
    Tone Comp: Auto
    Hue Adjustment: 0
    Saturation: Enhanced
    Sharpening: Medium high
    Image Comment:
    Noise Reduction: OFF

    Paul:
    I would recommend several things:
    1. Put your meter on manual and set it for spot metering. Most imes the meter is off because it is trying to "average" the scene and can't do it. This is especially true of a backlit scene.I use the center spot in my EOS for meterng and try to find a neutral gray tone in the scene. (grass, face, etc ) set meter and do exposure lock to hold it. It helps to have a B&W background cause you know what in a scene the film sees as neutral (18%) gray. Play with it.

    2> In my EOS I can set three different sets of parameters. I set one to give a flat exposure, for contrasty scenes second is negative for ultra contrasty ( snow scene ) and third is for very low contrast subject such as storm clouds and a gray day. I would imagine the D70 will be able to do that also. Or something similar.

    3> Shoot Nikon's version of raw, that way you get all the chip saw in the scene, unmodified. Use a program ( PS7 or PS 8cd ) which can handle RAW images.production then is working on the unmodified version of the scene and you can rearrange it as you please. After production, save as Tiff format. This keeps the 16 bit information in the photo so you don't have the loss you do in JPG, When/if you decide to post on web, then convert to jpg while keeping the original raw and tiff files.You get much better control of your photos and don't lose on compression.

    4> I notice that you are shooting at ISO 800. In the Nikonthat is a noisy setting and if you take a photo of a gray sky and blow it up you will easily see the noise. You can also see it in areas of your print. I try to use 100 or 200 when I can and the Canon is less noisy than the nikon ( no i am not starting a flame war, these are from reports I have read on many cameras.)

    5> i prefer the second photo and when I blew it up i can see detail on the white cat's head so it isn't blown out, but close. You need to reduce the contrast a little in the pic to make it better.

    6> and last, I recommend you play with exposures and settings in your camera, bracketing when you can so that you get a better fel for the camera. My EOS has an auto bracket setting and I use it at times to be sure I get the shot. I can adjust the range of bracketing up to 2 stops each way. I usually set mine at 1/2 to 1 stop.

    I can't remember all your questions, but anything directly related to Nicon or Nikon software I haven't a clue. I suggest you get PS elements as you can get a lot more help with that. Igf you decide to shoot RAW get PS 7 or 8 either can manipulate RAW and you can get a free upgrade on the RAW plugin from Photoshop web site. You can probably get 7 for much less that 8CS.

    Hope I have helpec a little bit.

    Ciao
    Michael :-)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drudkh
    foggy? looks like underexposed to me. or you have problem metering.
    I am using Matrix / Evaluative metering and thus probably the white cat has caused underexposed

  11. #11
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    Thanks mikeb380 for your advice....though some part are a bit advanced for me to understand.

    The reason i shot at iso800 is bcos it is early morning and not enough light.... and wanted higher shutter speed to prevent camera shake.... yes...i know it will be noisy....

    I am not familiar with those values in curves or levels.... and actually, how do u know the values to put in? just try and error until the pic is what i want or based on experience?

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    Thanks mikeb380 for your advice....though some part are a bit advanced for me to understand.

    The reason i shot at iso800 is bcos it is early morning and not enough light.... and wanted higher shutter speed to prevent camera shake.... yes...i know it will be noisy....

    I am not familiar with those values in curves or levels.... and actually, how do u know the values to put in? just try and error until the pic is what i want or based on experience?
    Paul, it will be a matter of trial and error, which is experience. The more you play with exposures the more you will learn. Just go out and shoot a lot of junk, trees, plants, houses, whatever. Try to get different contrast ranges and bracket. shoot one at (for instance) F16 at 1/100 then try F11 still at 1/100. Try using the camera on manual as much as you can as this builds up your experience and at some point, even using the camera as P&S you will have the settings so they are closer to what you want. Thank goodness the "film" is free and the delete key is handy. As I said, it doesn't matter what you shoot. If there is a beach handy or a lake go shoot some of the sun glinting on the water with some grass or sand showing. Put a person in the scene and see what a difference it makes. Just keep playing as much as you can, I have been playing for over 50 years and still going strong with it.

    One other thing you can do is get a monopod. They are light weight and can collapse so you can get low angle shots as well as normal height. Doesn't have to be expensive, just enough to help the movement of the camera. May allow slower shutter speeds/ISO settings. Again, just play with it.

    Michael
    Last edited by mikeb380; 7th February 2005 at 04:07 AM.

  13. #13
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    50 years!
    I haven't even use SLR for more than 5 years

    Now I know why I cannot produce nice pic yet.... I still have a long way to go

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    50 years!
    I haven't even use SLR for more than 5 years

    Now I know why I cannot produce nice pic yet.... I still have a long way to go
    if you keep telling yourself tt you cannot produce nice pic, then sad to tell you tt your skill will not improve at all , even in 50 years time. You should understand how the metering system works. Read up the metering articles at the library or online. Later try to practise the different type of metering modes to see the effect. I find consumer digital camera with LCD preview can provide good practise of metering.
    See my Photo Gallery at the Clubsnap

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_Yeo
    50 years!
    I haven't even use SLR for more than 5 years

    Now I know why I cannot produce nice pic yet.... I still have a long way to go
    Well, I just started to use SLR about 4 months ago Guess I'll have an even longer way to go lah

    I agree with most comments here, it's probably the original pic was a bit under exposed. Good part is that you shot it in RAW and still could recover the pic with post-processing.

    Cheers!

  16. #16

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    That's right. Practice goes a long way. The way I look at it it:
    [The more I practice = The more mistakes I get to make = The more I learn from my mistakes = The faster I improve = Better pictures will come out from the experience]

    Action:
    1. Read
    2. Learn
    3. Think
    4. Practice
    5. Share

    Requisites:
    1. Deligence
    2. Persistence
    3. Imagination
    4. Inspiration

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