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Thread: Coloured Filters

  1. #1

    Default Coloured Filters

    Can anyone provide detailed information about the use of the various coloured filters aside from the obvious change of colour? Other information about other filters (coloured or otherwise) will also be much appreciated.

    Thanks In Ad
    Tim

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyre of Fyre
    Can anyone provide detailed information about the use of the various coloured filters aside from the obvious change of colour? Other information about other filters (coloured or otherwise) will also be much appreciated.

    Thanks In Ad
    Tim
    If I'm not wrong... coloured filters are usually used on film SLRs for the following reasons:
    1) Correct colour cast (like white balance)
    2) Enhance certain colours in black and white photography
    3) Creative photography (both film and digital)

  3. #3
    Senior Member The_Cheat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amekaze
    If I'm not wrong... coloured filters are usually used on film SLRs for the following reasons:
    1) Correct colour cast (like white balance)
    2) Enhance certain colours in black and white photography
    3) Creative photography (both film and digital)
    Coloured filters are usually used in black and white photography to enhance or diminish the contrast in the shot. This is because different colour filter allows different spectrum of light to enter at different degree.

    For the correct colour cast in film SLR, usually people will not pop on a colour filter. Rather, they would use a warm filter or a cool filter (I can't remember the codes anymore!) to adjust to the different lighting to gain the white balance effect. Think a seasoned analog colour photographer would be able to elaborate more on that.

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    Senior Member Cheesecake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cheat

    For the correct colour cast in film SLR, usually people will not pop on a colour filter. Rather, they would use a warm filter or a cool filter (I can't remember the codes anymore!) to adjust to the different lighting to gain the white balance effect. Think a seasoned analog colour photographer would be able to elaborate more on that.


    the 81 series is the warming filter, from 81A, B, C , D and EF. with A being the weakest and EF being the strongest.

    the 82 series is the cool filter. with 82, 82A, B, C.

    the 85 series are strong warming filters with 85B the strongest, 85C the weakest and 85, falling in between both.

    the 80 series are the blue series, mostly used to correct tungsten lighting and other warm light sources for use with daylight balanced films. 80A is the strongest and 80D the weakest. B and C falls in between. this 80 series is much stronger than the 82 series.

    hope it helps!
    Last edited by Cheesecake; 6th February 2005 at 04:31 PM.
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  5. #5

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    Thanks all for the replies.

    Just another question along the same lines... What about the various other colours available like green, orange and red filters. Are these used in actual coloured film photography besides for colouration of images?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cheesecake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pyre of Fyre
    Thanks all for the replies.

    Just another question along the same lines... What about the various other colours available like green, orange and red filters. Are these used in actual coloured film photography besides for colouration of images?
    yes, these filters can be used in colour films for added 'special effects' or to create a particular mood.

    most oftenly, coloured filters are used for B/W photography.
    Yellow: General use filter -good for Outdoor portraiture against the sky.

    Yellow-Green: Lightens both green and yellow tones and increases red to a more bolder black. Best alternative to a yellow filter. personally, i don;t own any yellow filter but i do have a yellow-green filter which i love to use very much.

    Green: Darkens reds and lighten Greens. Handy as a general landscape filter;although it doesn;t affect the sky.

    Red: Most dramatic for B/W. Lightens red but darkens all other colours. gives a very dark and brooding mood.

    Orange: Bold effect esp. on the sky. Blue sky is deepened so that white clouds stand out. Greens are darkened too and there's a general increase in contrast, which produces bold images.

    Blue(80A): Less common choice for B/QW. used to lighten greens and darkens reds. it is most ideal for portraiture as it brings out skin tone and details in the face.

    hope all these helps...
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