Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33

Thread: creation of edge lights

  1. #1

    Lightbulb creation of edge lights

    which light modifiying accessory/ies would one use to create a narrow edge light eg. from the side on the hairs or side of face? inputs appreciated.

    there is no one 'right answer', so it is alright to differ.
    Last edited by reachme2003; 25th January 2005 at 10:12 PM.

  2. #2
    Moderator Clown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    3,779

    Default

    i think the term used is 'rim light'
    honeycomb + barndoors
    sigh.

  3. #3

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Clown
    i think the term used is 'rim light'
    honeycomb + barndoors
    i supposed it is the smallest size of honeycomb.

  4. #4

    Lightbulb

    upz for contributions. thanks.

  5. #5

    Default

    Let me clarify what you are trying to create.

    Say you have a ball. And you want the centre of the ball in relative darkness, and the edge of the ball, as seen from the front, with a rim of light. Is that right?

    I am absolutley no guru is using sophisticated lighting. But I doubt that it will be easy to create such "light rims" by using barndoors etc.

    But creating such rim lights is very easy. May I make a suggestion for your experimentation.

    Take an object (eg a vase)and place it in a relatively dark room. Use a light bulb, WITHOUT any light modifying gadjets. Put this light bulb in front of the vase. Of course you are not going to have a rim light. Then move this bulb in one direction slowly to the side and to the back. I guarantee you that at a certain point when the bulb is at a plane behind the vase, you will have a beautiful rim light. How much rim light you want depends on how directly the bulb is behind the vase. The thinnest rim of light you can create will be when the bulb is directly behind the vase.

    Have fun!

    No need for expensive gadjets!

  6. #6

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    Let me clarify what you are trying to create.

    Say you have a ball. And you want the centre of the ball in relative darkness, and the edge of the ball, as seen from the front, with a rim of light. Is that right?

    I am absolutley no guru is using sophisticated lighting. But I doubt that it will be easy to create such "light rims" by using barndoors etc.

    But creating such rim lights is very easy. May I make a suggestion for your experimentation.

    Take an object (eg a vase)and place it in a relatively dark room. Use a light bulb, WITHOUT any light modifying gadjets. Put this light bulb in front of the vase. Of course you are not going to have a rim light. Then move this bulb in one direction slowly to the side and to the back. I guarantee you that at a certain point when the bulb is at a plane behind the vase, you will have a beautiful rim light. How much rim light you want depends on how directly the bulb is behind the vase. The thinnest rim of light you can create will be when the bulb is directly behind the vase.

    Have fun!

    No need for expensive gadjets!
    thanks for your suggestion. i was thinking more of a human subject. anyway, thanks again.

  7. #7
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default

    strip light?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Astin Studio
    Posts
    4,736

    Default


    Are u referring to something like this photo?
    For this photo, I used 3 lights.
    1 light from the model front, with softbox.
    1 light from the model right side, high up in the ceiling, with honeycomb.
    1 light from the model left side, same height as face, with barndoor and red gel.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    thanks for your suggestion. i was thinking more of a human subject. anyway, thanks again.
    I am afraid you completely missed the point I was trying to make. The example of the vase is just a suggestion so that you can do the experiment easily. You can use a human subject instead of the vase if you so wish.

    The actual point I was trying to make is that rim light are formed through the postion of the light source, not any fanciful barndoors. Put a light with a barn doors almost touching each other, or a strip light, and place the light source in front of your model, and I guarantee you will not get a rim light. The example of a rim light in Astin photo is done with the light source to the left and slightly behind the model. Whether the light source is a plain bulb or any fanciful equipment is irrelevant.

    Understand light and the way light works, and things become easier.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    39

    Default

    erm.......quick question......
    is "honeycomb" another name for scrim or diffuser?

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Astin Studio
    Posts
    4,736

    Default


    This is what I called honeycomb. I dont know got any other names or not.

  12. #12
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default

    sometimes also called "grids"

    Quote Originally Posted by Astin

    This is what I called honeycomb. I dont know got any other names or not.

  13. #13

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by student
    I am afraid you completely missed the point I was trying to make. The example of the vase is just a suggestion so that you can do the experiment easily. You can use a human subject instead of the vase if you so wish.

    The actual point I was trying to make is that rim light are formed through the postion of the light source, not any fanciful barndoors. Put a light with a barn doors almost touching each other, or a strip light, and place the light source in front of your model, and I guarantee you will not get a rim light. The example of a rim light in Astin photo is done with the light source to the left and slightly behind the model. Whether the light source is a plain bulb or any fanciful equipment is irrelevant.

    Understand light and the way light works, and things become easier.
    thanks again. my understanding is that the angle of the relevant light/s at the subject is crucial in the successful creation of 'rim' light/s. of course, the manner the light is controlled, eg. using a snoot or honeycomb to limit the 'throw' of the light. this is impt when one does not want the relevant light/s to create unintended lights or shadows where it is not desired.

    typically, the position and angle of the such light/s may cause flare in the lens, so the use of gobos or something to block the light, is relevant too.

    vince, i have not use striplights before. care to share more.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    thanks again. my understanding is that the angle of the relevant light/s at the subject is crucial in the successful creation of 'rim' light/s. of course, the manner the light is controlled, eg. using a snoot or honeycomb to limit the 'throw' of the light. this is impt when one does not want the relevant light/s to create unintended lights or shadows where it is not desired.

    typically, the position and angle of the such light/s may cause flare in the lens, so the use of gobos or something to block the light, is relevant too.

    vince, i have not use striplights before. care to share more.
    We are getting somewhere.

    1 Rim lights are created by placement of the light source to the side, or for more pronounced effect, behind the plane of the subject

    2 It is definitely true that use of barn doors and the like can minimize "spillage". But if you place the lights carefully, the spillage is not significant. I never use gobos etc. And I have no spillage that I do not want

    3 It is true that when one place the light behind the subject, there is a real risk of lens flare. I have two simple solutions. One is called a lenshood. The other is called a cardboard. Placed on a flexible arm, the cardboard can be positioned anywhere to stop flare. There are many ways of course to avoid flare, and gobos are some of these methods. And they do work. But I have never needed them. And I see no reason to use them if lens flare and spillage are my concerns.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sleeper
    erm.......quick question......
    is "honeycomb" another name for scrim or diffuser?
    Here is a quick answer ......

    No.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by reachme2003
    thanks again. my understanding is that the angle of the relevant light/s at the subject is crucial in the successful creation of 'rim' light/s. of course, the manner the light is controlled, eg. using a snoot or honeycomb to limit the 'throw' of the light. this is impt when one does not want the relevant light/s to create unintended lights or shadows where it is not desired.

    typically, the position and angle of the such light/s may cause flare in the lens, so the use of gobos or something to block the light, is relevant too.

    vince, i have not use striplights before. care to share more.
    Sorry, do you have a sample of how does a rim light looks like?

    http://www.andrew-whitehurst.net/3point.html

  17. #17

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by blurblock
    Sorry, do you have a sample of how does a rim light looks like?

    http://www.andrew-whitehurst.net/3point.html
    off-hand, no, i do not have one to show.

    Austin, your photo does not portray what i have in mind. yours is hairlight(left) and red effect light.

    anyone use a reflector eg. a white board to reflect light onto the side of the face only. instead of using direct light onto the side of face?

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Is it something like this one? I basically put two softboxes, to the left and right of the model. With human, you'll get long dark shadow on the face, arms, body etc. With softbox, the shadow will be softer.

    If you like the effect much more, simply move the softboxes further behind the model. Depending on how much you want the flash light to spill out to the surroundings, you may need to use honeycomb or barn doors.



  19. #19

    Default

    well, not what i am having in my mind. thanks for sharing the use of two softboxes. like your chinese seal characters.

  20. #20
    vince123123
    Guests

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by kernel
    Is it something like this one? I basically put two softboxes, to the left and right of the model. With human, you'll get long dark shadow on the face, arms, body etc. With softbox, the shadow will be softer.

    If you like the effect much more, simply move the softboxes further behind the model. Depending on how much you want the flash light to spill out to the surroundings, you may need to use honeycomb or barn doors.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •