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Thread: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polyclinic

  1. #1

    Thumbs down Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polyclinic

    so sad, i want to cry....

    see they way they walked.....got great difficulty....



    cruel world...
    Objection !!!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    why didn't the videographer give them money for a cab?
    Alpha

  3. #3

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    why didn't the videographer give them money for a cab?
    Only want fame.. no compassion

  4. #4

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    why didn't the videographer give them money for a cab?
    check the poster name.
    Last edited by ninelives; 20th July 2012 at 12:51 AM.
    Objection !!!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    `because, he was trying to highlight the crux of the matter - That a country where the ministers are one of the highest paid in the world, there are people like them that are barely surviving.

    And it is not about compassion, it is about the truth of that moment. And yes boys and girls, it is ugly. And it is partly what journalism is all about (though the video can be construed as self-serving)

    The fact is, why isn't anybody else helping them? Why should the videographer help them? Or how about any of us? When we see folks like these, do we go out of way to help them? Do we pretend not to see them (you know, look down and walk straight) ?


    I commented on another post, .....about the Bromptons, yeah I know, it is a cheap shot. But tadaaaa...... 2k on bromptons but no transport for these folks.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Quote Originally Posted by pscion12 View Post
    Or how about any of us? When we see folks like these, do we go out of way to help them?
    I do.
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Good for you, you're one of the few then.

    But there are many that don't. We have to do better. I admit that sometimes I don't and I feel guilty about it. This video should, in-part, serve as a reminder. God help us, when we're that old and nobody to help us.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    It is wrong to blame the videographer.
    If he did not video the whole thing and gave money to the couple to take a taxi home, then the video would not have been made.
    Then Singapore viewers of Internet video would not know about this.
    And the next 100 times the elderly couple have to go and see doctor, no one will be there to give them money to take taxi home.

    The point of the video is to highlight the plight of the have-nots.

    Actually the doctor's clinic is to blame.
    If he can see that these are very poor folks, and typical private practice doctor earns >$1Million a year, then he can waive the medical fee of $28.

    Some of the young girls at the clinic counter in private clinics are VERY rude to poor folks.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Agree with ricohflex, if this videographer had not harden his or her heart to make this video, ppl will not notice this old couple n knw of their difficulty. Even if i were to walk past them halfway through their journey, i would have tot tt they live around the area and are out and about to do their shopping or jus out for a walk and wont knw tt they are actually walking home becos they have no $$. Cos its not like anyone would go to every elderly they walk pass to ask "are u in trouble or do u need my help"
    If i see them crossing the road i will go up to them and help at least help to stop the traffic, or if i were to see the old lady massaging the old man legs i would have ask if he is alright and needed any help.
    But if they jus walk pass me i don think i would notice tt they are in need of help.
    Last edited by blackster; 20th July 2012 at 02:25 AM.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Their love for each other last for so long, so precious.
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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by pscion12
    `because, he was trying to highlight the crux of the matter - That a country where the ministers are one of the highest paid in the world, there are people like them that are barely surviving.

    And it is not about compassion, it is about the truth of that moment. And yes boys and girls, it is ugly. And it is partly what journalism is all about (though the video can be construed as self-serving)

    The fact is, why isn't anybody else helping them? Why should the videographer help them? Or how about any of us? When we see folks like these, do we go out of way to help them? Do we pretend not to see them (you know, look down and walk straight) ?

    I commented on another post, .....about the Bromptons, yeah I know, it is a cheap shot. But tadaaaa...... 2k on bromptons but no transport for these folks.
    Don't try to turn this into a political thread.

    This is nothing but propaganda. Opposition videos help, people praise them. Ruling party perhaps does the same, people slam them as being fake.

    In a country where the citizens blame the government for everything under the sun, it's no wonder why they're never satisfied.

    BTW i do give out money to those poor people who ask, if i feel that it's a genuine case (old drunkards who reek of alcohol saying they need money to do something, i'd rather not give them beer money and ruin their health further).

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by pscion12
    `because, he was trying to highlight the crux of the matter - That a country where the ministers are one of the highest paid in the world, there are people like them that are barely surviving.

    And it is not about compassion, it is about the truth of that moment. And yes boys and girls, it is ugly. And it is partly what journalism is all about (though the video can be construed as self-serving)

    The fact is, why isn't anybody else helping them? Why should the videographer help them? Or how about any of us? When we see folks like these, do we go out of way to help them? Do we pretend not to see them (you know, look down and walk straight) ?

    I commented on another post, .....about the Bromptons, yeah I know, it is a cheap shot. But tadaaaa...... 2k on bromptons but no transport for these folks.
    High pay is necessary to prevent corruption. Dont tell me that if SDP becomes the ruling party they wont have a high salary too :O Anyway what does bromptons have to do with this?

    Anyway what was the purpose of the video? To show that the healthcare system is doing more harm then good? so where are their children?

    Anyone else noticed that they don't seem to give a **** when there is a man filming them so obviously along the road?
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  13. #13
    Senior Member giantcanopy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    This video was taken in pursuit of an underhand political agenda, and this alone should beg viewers an opportunity to reconsider initial reactions.

  14. #14
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    And the next 100 times the elderly couple have to go and see doctor, no one will be there to give them money to take taxi home.
    Even if there is someone to give this couple money, what about the other couples?

    Do you really think that an "elderly couple taxi fare" group is going to be formed as a result of this video?

    Do we know about the problem already? But close our eyes to it inherently, pushing it to the entity known as the Government (thereby indirectly quashing the voice within us known as conscience by externalizing the issue and pretending that we have no part to play in each other's lives?)? What's stopping person A, person B or person C from helping? What is right, since no healthcare and social safety net system is perfect? Talk and videos are cheap, easy to talk shop on the internet and claim all sort of things but actual actions that cost people are a different matter altogether. Like Gandhi says - Be the change you want to see. I honestly don't see how the video helps anything at all, but generate a bunch of comments that mean nothing to the couple , or couples going through such hardship.
    Last edited by edutilos-; 20th July 2012 at 08:38 AM.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    @Kei1309

    I did not turn this into a political thread. The video itself was already a political statement. I merely stated the obvious and the most probable intend that the videographer was trying to make. The questions I asked stems from the fact that we are an aging society, this scene is anything but uncommon. It is good that you do help, this is not sarcasm. Again I say, we have to do better because we will all get old someday, and if we don't do something about it now, we're all in deep doodoo. We cannot just hope to get hand-outs from random strangers that may or may not come.

    The thing is, yes I know, in Singapore, we complain from A to Z and because of that, genuine complaint and issues get labelled as "just another Singaporean complaint". That is a very dangerous thing to do as proper concerns becomes mired or tied and even used as a political agenda rather than getting the proper attention that it should receive. At least do we agree on that?


    @fudgecakes
    Regarding the bromptons, that is me and my stupid brand of teasing/humour. I already said it was a cheapshot.
    You know, the disparity of having a 2k bike and an old couple that can't even afford a ride home?..... Which may or may not be relevant......


    "High pay is necessary to prevent corruption" - Whoa... that statement made me sit up straight for a moment. It is extremely naive to think that it does. How many instances have we seen that the biggest forms of corruption comes from those who has money and position of power. It simply means that it requires more money to motivate them to do it, that is all. Don't misunderstand, I'm not saying that the government is corrupt. Nope, I'm saying that if a person if corruptible, he will be corrupted no matter what you pay him or her, it is greed, simple as that.

    Which of course brings to my next question. Would you have someone that is motivated by money(among other things)? or by someone who is genuinely concern for his country?
    then of course we also have to question the competency of the person. Do we want someone who is good at his job but motivated by money or bad at his job but sincere?

    For all purposes, if I did offend you, it was not my intend. I apologise. I prefer a healthy discussion.


    ps In fact, it just occured to me, the very premise of the statement "high pay to prevent corruption" assumes that all people are corrupted and are paid highly so that they are less motivated to do so.
    Last edited by pscion12; 20th July 2012 at 08:55 AM.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    ps In fact, it just occured to me, the very premise of the statement "high pay to prevent corruption" assumes that all people are corrupted and are paid highly so that they are less motivated to do so.
    It is a somewhat sad way to think of things, but that is reality isn't it? Humans are inherently weak and easy to succumb to temptation.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    What the heck is this? Is this really a direct impact caused by the healtcare and polyclinics? Where is the link? Meaning to say the Healthcare policies and Polyclinics have more responsibilities to the elderly transportations than their own CHILDREN and FAMILY members????

    Suddenly I had noticed the mark on the top right of the video, what had once been a respectable opposition had done to stoop so low as to try to pull supporters with such a ridiculous title to this video? This only work on fools who go by branding, that is, as long as they are the opposition, they are the one! Come on, if anyone want to win, they need to put their bet on some one who is/are more matured, smarter, dedicated worker and real warrior, .... definitely much more than people with such childish mentality (like those pushing this video, not referring to TS ). Getting such group into the political arena is a joke, as well as meat for the tigers! ...simply just waste of time, ... I may rather vote for some hawkers instead...
    Last edited by MacroMarlin; 20th July 2012 at 09:31 AM.
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  18. #18

    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    What I saw in this video is TRUE LOVE.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by cks2k2

    It is a somewhat sad way to think of things, but that is reality isn't it? Humans are inherently weak and easy to succumb to temptation.
    The negative part of me agrees, and feels kinda sad coz it supports my earlier statement that money is no guarantee for integrity. The optimist part of me believes the duality of man, that we are capable of both bad and good.

  20. #20
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Elderly Singaporean couple forced to walk home after paying doctor's fees (polycl

    Quote Originally Posted by pscion12 View Post
    Again I say, we have to do better because we will all get old someday, and if we don't do something about it now, we're all in deep doodoo. We cannot just hope to get hand-outs from random strangers that may or may not come.
    I really don't foresee hordes of elderly walking home from clinics, actually. Just saying.

    Nope, I'm saying that if a person if corruptible, he will be corrupted no matter what you pay him or her, it is greed, simple as that.

    Which of course brings to my next question. Would you have someone that is motivated by money(among other things)? or by someone who is genuinely concern for his country?
    then of course we also have to question the competency of the person. Do we want someone who is good at his job but motivated by money or bad at his job but sincere?
    That first statement's rather absolute, isn't it? There are many more factors than just "corruptible or not". Even corruptibility has different degrees. I would go so far as to say that everyone possibly has his price, and it may not be in terms of money - but having a high pay probably does play a role (not clear how significant though) in dissuading corruption in the form of bribery. Putting it into a rather simplistic framework - the choice a highly paid person faces when say, he is offered a bribe is going to be rather different from a person receiving less pay:

    Highly paid person faces the choice of (A) Taking the bribe and risking losing his high pay if discovered; or (B) Rejecting the bribe and being sure of continuing his high pay. When you substitute a high pay for something less, then the choice becomes blurrer, doesn't it - and if you push it to the extreme and pay him nothing at all (claiming that he will get an extremely pleasant warm fuzzy feeling in his heart by doing public service) then you can see why B becomes a rather more attractive choice.

    This probably also answers your next question somewhat. I think the underlying idea of high pay in Singapore isn't "let's attract the money-minded". It tends more towards the "let's get the people who want to serve, and make sure that they aren't tempted to err". It's of course debateable (which is why ministerial pay is so often debated publicly and privately) how much you should pay to lower the chances of temptation but I think it is a little warped to say that waving high ministerial pay only results in money-motivated individuals coming forward. That's certainly not true as a Minister's job doesn't involve just stepping forward to collect pay, it also involves a lot of other things like being thrust into severe and critical public scrutiny, some amount of commitment in terms of time and responsibility.

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