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Thread: Camera Settings

  1. #1
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    Default Camera Settings

    Hi All,

    As I am pretty new to photography, I would like to seek some advice on common settings for shutter and ISO when taking photos.

    TIA!

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    Quote Originally Posted by frostyIntrepid
    Hi All,

    As I am pretty new to photography, I would like to seek some advice on common settings for shutter and ISO when taking photos.

    TIA!
    Hi frostyIntrepid,

    Photography fall into many area like portrait, studio, sport, wedding etc .... so which area are you interested in ?
    寒冰不能斷流水 枯木亦會再逢春

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    hmm, well maybe nature or sport??

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    Quote Originally Posted by frostyIntrepid
    hmm, well maybe nature or sport??
    To start off, use as high a shutter speed you can acheive... From what I have learnt, you'll need at the very least 1/125 sec shutter speed. Open up your aperture and try to get as fast a shutter speed as you can with the lowest ISO you can use, if you cannot acheive at least 1/125 sec shutter speed or faster, then no choice and switch to a higher ISO, which may degrade image quality but it depends on 101+ other factors too...

    Hope that helps!
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

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    hi frostyintrepid, what camera are you using?

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    Quote Originally Posted by frostyIntrepid
    hmm, well maybe nature or sport??
    Hope this could help

    http://www.acdsystems.com/English/Co...oTips/archives

    寒冰不能斷流水 枯木亦會再逢春

  7. #7

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    if u are using digicam then generally dont go beyond ISO 200 because it will be very noisy beyond that

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    Using 300D!

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    i'm posting my reply here, because it is too long for PM!

    well, to begin with, you must understand what exactly IS shutter speed & ISO ratings all about.

    in SLR cameras (like your 300D), the shutter actually refers to the mechanism behind the mirror. this mechanism will open and close when you trigger the shoot button. how long or short this mechanism stays open is called 'shutter speed'.

    shutter speed, aperture and ISO all work together hand in hand to CONTROL exposure in your camera. i use the word 'control' is because that's what exactly it is. you are the one determining which factor to play around with (shutter,aperture,ISO).

    'slower' shutter speed will let in more light (good when you are shooting in dim areas), 'faster' shutter speed will only expose the film/sensor for a split second. how much light you think you require to expose will determine the shutter speed you set.

    do remember, when you are using a slow shutter speed, anything that moves quickly will be captured as a motion-blur. this is because the subject is continously being exposed as he moves across the film/sensor plane while the shutter is open. also, if you are shooting hand-held with a slow shutter speed, if your hand moves, the movement will be captured as well, resulting in blur pictures. you might want to consider using a tripod in this case.

    as such, if you prefer to shoot fast moving subjects like sports or birds, you might want to use a fast shutter speed to 'freeze' the subject. therefore, to ensure the correct amount of exposure, you need to compensate either with a bigger aperture, or higher ISO. (remember i said they all work hand in hand? you cannot change 1 without changing another, if you want to ensure the same amount of exposure).

    however, if you are shooting with flashes, there is a limit to how fast you can set your shutter speed to. this is called the 'flash sync' speed. please refer to your manual. anything faster than this speed might result in incorrect flash exposure. please refer to this article

    talking about ISO, it actually refers to an international standard for rating film sensitivity. for common terms, it refers to how sensitive the film/sensor is to light. the higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. (which means you can use either a faster shutter speed or smaller aperture, but still capture the same amount of exposure). the drawback is, when you use a higher ISO, more 'grain' or 'noise' will be introduced into the picture. that is why people always recommend to use as low an ISO if possible.

    hope it helps
    Last edited by Stereobox; 19th January 2005 at 08:33 AM.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stereobox
    i'm posting my reply here, because it is too long for PM!

    well, to begin with, you must understand what exactly IS shutter speed & ISO ratings all about.

    in SLR cameras (like your 300D), the shutter actually refers to the mechanism behind the mirror. this mechanism will open and close when you trigger the shoot button. how long or short this mechanism stays open is called 'shutter speed'.

    shutter speed, aperture and ISO all work together hand in hand to CONTROL exposure in your camera. i use the word 'control' is because that's what exactly it is. you are the one determining which factor to play around with (shutter,aperture,ISO).

    'slower' shutter speed will let in more light (good when you are shooting in dim areas), 'faster' shutter speed will only expose the film/sensor for a split second. how much light you think you require to expose will determine the shutter speed you set.

    do remember, when you are using a slow shutter speed, anything that moves quickly will be captured as a motion-blur. this is because the subject is continously being exposed as he moves across the film/sensor plane while the shutter is open. also, if you are shooting hand-held with a slow shutter speed, if your hand moves, the movement will be captured as well, resulting in blur pictures. you might want to consider using a tripod in this case.

    as such, if you prefer to shoot fast moving subjects like sports or birds, you might want to use a fast shutter speed to 'freeze' the subject. therefore, to ensure the correct amount of exposure, you need to compensate either with a bigger aperture, or higher ISO. (remember i said they all work hand in hand? you cannot change 1 without changing another, if you want to ensure the same amount of exposure).

    however, if you are shooting with flashes, there is a limit to how fast you can set your shutter speed to. this is called the 'flash sync' speed. please refer to your manual. anything faster than this speed might result in incorrect flash exposure. please refer to this article

    talking about ISO, it actually refers to an international standard for rating film sensitivity. for common terms, it refers to how sensitive the film/sensor is to light. the higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. (which means you can use either a faster shutter speed or smaller aperture, but still capture the same amount of exposure). the drawback is, when you use a higher ISO, more 'grain' or 'noise' will be introduced into the picture. that is why people always recommend to use as low an ISO if possible.

    hope it helps
    Hi,
    I'm a newbie to photography also....and I find your reply very helpful.
    Could you elaborate on the exposure settings for flash photography?
    If say I'm in shooting indoors, in a room lit by florescent lights, what sort of exposure settings do you suggest if I use flash?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by magic
    Hi,
    I'm a newbie to photography also....and I find your reply very helpful.
    Could you elaborate on the exposure settings for flash photography?
    If say I'm in shooting indoors, in a room lit by florescent lights, what sort of exposure settings do you suggest if I use flash?
    hmm..it gets a bit more tricky here

    in this case, you are dealing with two or more potential light sources. 1) the fluorescents 2) your flash 3) daylight, if its near an open window.

    all the light sources operate at different color temperatures (meaning they will appear to give different color from each other on film/digital. typically fluorescents are more green, while sunlight & flash is more white/blue). you'll have to decide which you want to be the dominant light source, and set your white balance accordingly.

    if you decide to let the fluorescents be the dominant light source (not recommended), you might have to use color temperature correcting gels to alter the color temperature of the flash n sunlight to match the fluorescents. plus those lights are definitely less powerful than flash or sunlight, resulting in usage of higher ISO and/or slower shutter speeds combi.

    i assume you are talking about using the flash mounted on the hotshoe of your camera?

    flash exposure is determined by the aperture set on your lens. ambient light exposure (in this case, fluorescents and sunlight) is determined by shutter speed. ISO will directly result in the overall brightness.

    i'm assuming again - you are shooting, say, your friend in a room lit by fluorescents, and you want to use the flash on your camera? f/5.6 will give a comfortable working distance (if your flash is set to auto, and you are using ISO 400...you can stand anywhere roughly from 1.5 metre - 11metres away) the shutter speed will determine how much ambient light will be captured. 1/60s would be a good balance. 1/30s or lower will 'soak' in more ambient light (beward of handshake motion). if the room is very very bright, you might even set the shutter speed higher (but don't exceed flash sync speed of your camera).

    hope this helps again! it sounds even more confusing than my first reply.
    Last edited by Stereobox; 19th January 2005 at 01:56 PM.

  12. #12

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    wow, thanks for the tips!
    Yes, I'm referring to a flash unit mounted on my camera.

    abt the ISO bit....you mean on the flash unit I should set my ISO to 400? Shld the ISO setting for the camera be the same as well?
    I normally use the TTL mode.

    So for the apecture values, correct me if I'm wrong.....if in a dimly lit room and assuming I'm abt 1 meter from the subject, I should open my apecture more?

  13. #13
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    first of all...shooting at a distance of 1metre, pointing a flash at your subject can be a very scary experience!

    to understand what aperture you should set to, you should first understand the relation between the power of your flash (measured in Guide numbers/GN), aperture and working distance.

    GN = f/stop x Flash-to-subject distance

    GNs are usually given for either feet or meters, and at ISO 100. lets say, i'm using a Nikon Speedlight SB-80DX which has a given GN of 125 (ISO 100/feet)..
    which means at full power, my speedlight can expose a subject correctly standing 125 feet away, using an f-stop of 1.0, using ISO 100.

    to convert GN in feet to meters, use this formula

    GN(m) = GN(ft) x 0.3

    therefore, my SB-80DX has a given GN of 37.5 (ISO 100/meter). at full power, i will approximately need to set an f/stop of ... 37.5??

    in your case, you are using ISO 400. there's another formula for calculating GNs when you use ISO. when you double the film speed, the GN changes by a factor of 1.4 times. therefore, my GN is now 73.5 (ISO 400/meter)

    at this point of time, you might be already thinking, my lens don't even exceed f/32. you are right. therefore a good flash will allow you to cut the full power in terms of stops (1/1 , 1/2, 1/4 and so on)

    well...you'll find the above useful IF you ever decide to shoot using manual flash most of the time, it's a good idea to set it on TTL. the flash will cut off itself when the flash system decides that, hey, we are getting correct exposure. on my SB-80DX, on TTL mode ...if i'm using ISO 400, and f/8 ... the flash will automatically expose correctly for subjects between the range of 0.8m - 9.5m. this range of working distance is actually displayed at the back of the LCD screen of the flash.

    hope it helps?

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    anyway, to simply answer your question, the answer is No, you don't open up your aperture when your subject is closer. remember? flash exposure is determined by aperture. the bigger you open, the more the exposure. if you open up, guaranteed the subject will be burnt out.

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