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Thread: Understanding Aperture priority

  1. #21

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by thoongeng View Post
    And remember your eyes are much more powerful than camera sensors! I never appreciated how much brighter the sunlight is compared to indoor lighting until I learnt about exposure
    if only we had a camera with a sensor of the power of our eye, most of us can safely say screw ND filters, GND filters and HDR

  2. #22

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Who knows, in future there'll be cameras that can be connected to our brain waves via some patches wired to our forehead

  3. #23

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Press your nose to snap, pull your ear to share on Facebook

  4. #24
    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    as many said, the camera is an idiot in Aperature mode when it's low light. best to use manual in this situation. If the subject isn't moving much you can even shoot at 1/15 1/30 (if you've steady hands) iso 400 indoors with aperature of 2.8-5.6 have tried it numerous times.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by dennisc
    as many said, the camera is an idiot in Aperature mode when it's low light. best to use manual in this situation. If the subject isn't moving much you can even shoot at 1/15 1/30 (if you've steady hands) iso 400 indoors with aperature of 2.8-5.6 have tried it numerous times.
    No. Best to use shutter priority as he needs a fast shutter speed.

    He is obviously a newbie, no need to overwhelm him with manual mode where he still needs to get the metering right.
    Alpha

  6. #26

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    max out the iso and to heckle with the noise grains. aperture mode will work pretty ok then

  7. #27
    Member MechaEd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Actually, why not set auto ISO then P mode and see if you can get decent shots out of it? See what works then switch to A to adjust.

  8. #28

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by MechaEd View Post
    Actually, why not set auto ISO then P mode and see if you can get decent shots out of it? See what works then switch to A to adjust.
    hell no. the camera's AI fail in low light situation. they are programmed to know how to obtain the right exposure only, and they attempt to use the best combination. Using Auto ISO + Av mode in low light situation is almost a guaranteed fail, because AI will try to use the lowest ISO and lowest shutter speed combination. Instead of a 1/200s ISO 3200 combination, it may just give you a 1/25s ISO 400 combination. It's even worse if you go full auto because you allow AI to decide everything for yourself.

    Like bro Rashkae mentioned, under low light situation but you need a certain shutter speed to prevent handshake/freeze motion, then use Tv. For TS who is a newbie, he can use Tv with Auto ISO.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    end of the day know the exposure triangle and your camera

    my camera on auto-ISO only chooses up to 1600, in situations that are darker and using kit lens, if choose Shutter priority mode at 1/100s the Aperture number will flash and picture will only turn out underexposed

  10. #30
    Senior Member dennisc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by liteon View Post
    So you think HK Sea Lion is sick and not moving fast?
    I said if the subject isn't moving, for outdoors strong lighting there shouldn't be too much prob if he can set it correctly. If it's really dark like outdoors (like the pic) without flash, you can still shoot say 5.6 1/125 @ 70-300mm kit (iso 800) like these fast moving chicks, gave a 1-2sec smooch http://i46.tinypic.com/1iyxw.jpg. Can show you my card, 99% are clear. Hard to explain, still a lot for me to learn also.
    Rashkae and the rest is right, shutter and flash should be best for him.
    Last edited by dennisc; 19th June 2012 at 11:20 PM.

  11. #31
    Member skinnywitch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    you still don't get it,

    Aperture priority, means you gave priority to Aperture, YOU let camera decide the shutter speed for you.

    what is SS mode in manual mode? Super Star mode in manual mode?

    anyway, when in low light, that is not enough light for making decent exposure. if you want to have faster shutter speed, you need to compensate with using bigger aperture or higher ISO.

    for the example you shots in indoor. the shutter speed is 1/25s, to increase your shutter speed to 1/400s, you need to increase your ISO from ISO 640 to around ISO 5600

    i'm a newbie too. after reading what was mentioned above, i would like to confirm one thingy. if i want to take a night scene with water and in order to get long exposure, i have to get my shutter speed eg. 30 sec and set my ISO to the lowest like 100? how about the setting for aperture?
    i realised that when i shoot with f/11 with shutter 30 sec, iso100, the lighting from the buildings or street lights looks kinda blur and somehow overexposed too. but i do have have nice lighting reflection with color on the water. however, i used the same shutter and iso but up my aperture from f/11 to f/22, the lighting from the buildings and street lights are sharper with star effect. as compared to f/11, it does not produce a nice lighting reflection on the water, not as colorful as the previous aperture. is there any way to have both qualities?

  12. #32

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Graduated ND filter or take two photos and combine together.
    Canon 5D MkIII|70-200 f/2.8L IS II USM|24-70 f2.8 L II USM|Σ 50 f1.4 EX DG HSM

  13. #33
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by skinnywitch View Post
    i'm a newbie too. after reading what was mentioned above, i would like to confirm one thingy. if i want to take a night scene with water and in order to get long exposure, i have to get my shutter speed eg. 30 sec and set my ISO to the lowest like 100? how about the setting for aperture?
    i realised that when i shoot with f/11 with shutter 30 sec, iso100, the lighting from the buildings or street lights looks kinda blur and somehow overexposed too. but i do have have nice lighting reflection with color on the water. however, i used the same shutter and iso but up my aperture from f/11 to f/22, the lighting from the buildings and street lights are sharper with star effect. as compared to f/11, it does not produce a nice lighting reflection on the water, not as colorful as the previous aperture. is there any way to have both qualities?
    a very simple way which myself uses... dun rem any formulae, go for the trial and error.

    switch your cam to bulb mode, set to f11 or any aperture u want, iso 100, start from 30 secs or even longer then 30 secs if u got a cable release attached to your cam, if the image dun works well, change the shutter speed to 25 secs and so forth. u will definitely get a final image with the correct exposure. though time consuming, but u will learn fast next time roughly how to gauge.

  14. #34

    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by skinnywitch View Post
    i'm a newbie too. after reading what was mentioned above, i would like to confirm one thingy. if i want to take a night scene with water and in order to get long exposure, i have to get my shutter speed eg. 30 sec and set my ISO to the lowest like 100? how about the setting for aperture?
    i realised that when i shoot with f/11 with shutter 30 sec, iso100, the lighting from the buildings or street lights looks kinda blur and somehow overexposed too. but i do have have nice lighting reflection with color on the water. however, i used the same shutter and iso but up my aperture from f/11 to f/22, the lighting from the buildings and street lights are sharper with star effect. as compared to f/11, it does not produce a nice lighting reflection on the water, not as colorful as the previous aperture. is there any way to have both qualities?
    I think it's hard to say which technique or setting, it all depends on the the lighting conditions at that time. It all depends on the number of light source and it's intensity. Need to do some trial and error

    There was once I was shooting a night scene of a dimly building, I wanted to blur the people walking past, but there was one single lamp post on the extreme right side of my frame. I tried many times, but while the building are Nicely lit and the people are blur, the lamp post light was over exposed

    In the end I used a black card to block the slight part of the lens( where the lamp was) to reduce overexposure from that part

  15. #35
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    a very simple way which myself uses... dun rem any formulae, go for the trial and error.

    switch your cam to bulb mode, set to f11 or any aperture u want, iso 100, start from 30 secs or even longer then 30 secs if u got a cable release attached to your cam, if the image dun works well, change the shutter speed to 25 secs and so forth. u will definitely get a final image with the correct exposure. though time consuming, but u will learn fast next time roughly how to gauge.
    sounds a bit too much like "tikam-tikam" though.
    I feel that it's better to learn how to understand how to read the camera's light meter, and what kind of effect shutter speed and aperture has on the final image.
    Exploring! :)

  16. #36
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    sounds a bit too much like "tikam-tikam" though.
    I feel that it's better to learn how to understand how to read the camera's light meter, and what kind of effect shutter speed and aperture has on the final image.
    hmm shooting in bulb mode ... i dun recall i see the light meter (i may be wrong cos i am still using this tikam method). i usually only use bulb mode for long exposure shots (even if i am shooting below 30 secs).

  17. #37
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    hmm shooting in bulb mode ... i dun recall i see the light meter (i may be wrong cos i am still using this tikam method). i usually only use bulb mode for long exposure shots (even if i am shooting below 30 secs).
    Ah yes. No meter in bulb mode, coz the camera has no idea how long you wanna depress the shutter release
    There is no real problem with using your method, if you still get the desired result in the end. But it could be quite time consuming, unless the "built-in light meter" in your brain is fairly accurate
    Exploring! :)

  18. #38
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    Ah yes. No meter in bulb mode, coz the camera has no idea how long you wanna depress the shutter release
    There is no real problem with using your method, if you still get the desired result in the end. But it could be quite time consuming, unless the "built-in light meter" in your brain is fairly accurate
    yup... dats why i can stuck in the same spot for 1-2 hours or even 3 hours! lol... and sometimes i may lose good light.

    but well... i am lazy to rem those forumulaes haha... but after shooting a while already... it just takes me 2-3 tikam attempts to get it right

  19. #39
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    a very simple way which myself uses... dun rem any formulae, go for the trial and error.

    switch your cam to bulb mode, set to f11 or any aperture u want, iso 100, start from 30 secs or even longer then 30 secs if u got a cable release attached to your cam, if the image dun works well, change the shutter speed to 25 secs and so forth. u will definitely get a final image with the correct exposure. though time consuming, but u will learn fast next time roughly how to gauge.
    This is not very efficient though. If you are intending to do a long exposure during the sunset timing you are going to miss the best light if you are still messing around with that. Either that or end up with a noisy image because it is underexposed, or worse, a blown image which you can't keep.

    The fastest way is to learn how to read your light meter, learn exactly how your ND filters work (they don't always do what they claim to be, e.g. my ND106 seems closer to 6 1/2 stops) and if you want to be sure, take a quick test shot at high ISO, wide open and leave some room for slight overexposure (to cater for changing light conditions, if necessary). If you shoot in RAW you can save some amount of highlights.There is no issue for reciprocity failure in digital so you hardly have a problem by using this method.
    Last edited by edutilos-; 22nd June 2012 at 10:30 AM.

  20. #40
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Understanding Aperture priority

    Quote Originally Posted by edutilos- View Post
    This is not very efficient though. If you are intending to do a long exposure during the sunset timing you are going to miss the best light if you are still messing around with that. Either or end up with a noisy image because it is underexposed, or worse, a blown image which you can't keep.

    The fastest way is to learn how to read your light meter, learn exactly how your ND filters work (they don't always do what they claim to be, e.g. my ND106 seems closer to 6 1/2 stops) and if you want to be sure, take a quick test shot at high ISO, wide open and leave some room for slight overexposure (to cater for changing light conditions, if necessary). If you shoot in RAW you can save some amount of highlights.There is no issue for reciprocity failure in digital so you hardly have a problem by using this method.

    yup... i agree its not efficient... but after using this tikam method for a while, i roughly have a few setup in mind, so just took me 2-3 attempts to get it right.

    and you are right about the ND filters... they aren't exactly want they claim to be haha... but so far after switching to LEE Big Stopper, its quite fairly accurate.

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